Adhesive for "less than snug" dowel?

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I can't imagine why. The sawdust makes it a "reinforced resin", much like those Kreg jigs everyone raves about. ;)
nb
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Lew is/was a huge beleiver in microballoons. Which are great, especially if you care about the weight of the completed project, but not everyone keeps a 50lb box of microballoons on hand, or has a West Marine store handy to buy some.
Pretty much every woodworker has sawdust.
John
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Reading these posts, it reminds me of why I don't use GG. Anything that is fussy, takes extra steps, can be hit or miss in its application, or puts any doubt <<at all>> of failure never makes it to the job.
Robert
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Funny, the same things could be said for why I don't like Olive Garden.
Puckdropper
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On 06 Apr 2016 21:13:23 GMT, Puckdropper <puckdropper(at)yahoo(dot)com> wrote:

Works for me, too.
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On Wed, 6 Apr 2016 13:01:54 -0700 (PDT), " snipped-for-privacy@aol.com"

I will add another to the list, the bottle I bought was not moisture tight enough it would have made a good mallet if it had a handle.
Mark
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snipped-for-privacy@ix.netcom.com says...

But the institution known as a "hobby shop" is available in most localities in the US.

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On Wed, 6 Apr 2016 18:47:06 -0000 (UTC), John McCoy

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On Tuesday, April 5, 2016 at 2:56:07 PM UTC-4, John McCoy wrote:

I recently had a number of pieces appraised at my house, pieces that came from SWMBO's grandmother.
My sister recently had a number of pieces appraised at her house, pieces that came from our grandparents and great-grandparents.
My brother stopped by an antiques dealer/consignment shop recently to get some general information about selling older furniture/antiques.
3 different people talking to 3 different appraisers in 3 different states, all getting basically the same answer:
Determining what a piece is "worth" is one thing. Finding a buyer at that price is getting more and more difficult these days. The older folks who once cherished finely built furniture, hand crafted china, etc. are dying off or have all that they need. The younger generations don't care about the old stuff because nobody furnishes their houses that way anymore.
The guy that came to my house basically told us that we had some really nice pieces (both furniture and china) but not to expect to get anywhere near the prices he quoted if we tried to sell it. He said to use his numbers for insurance purposes, but don't expect even half that if we tried to sell it.
When I mentioned the prices for pieces of china at sites like replacements.com, he said that those prices are their retail prices, not what they would buy the pieces from us for.
It's a shame that a lot of really nice isn't worth much anymore.

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On Tue, 5 Apr 2016 13:10:13 -0700 (PDT), DerbyDad03

Just wait till you want to buy a piece, skies the limit. These guys tell you that song and dance because some of it sits in stock for a long time. But they will never give the stuff away at a lower price.
Antique flea markets are good for pieces that show wear, for the primo stuff it depends on where you are at.

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On Wednesday, April 6, 2016 at 11:12:51 AM UTC-4, OFWW wrote:

In my case, it wasn't a song and dance, because I paid the guy a fee to do an appraisal. There was no expectation of an exchange of money or goods. This guy is often the "guest appraiser" at antique events/flea markets, etc. in our area. When we made the appointment he told me "I charge by the hour. Do yourself a favor: Number every item that you want me to appraise and have a notebook ready. That way I can give you a brief explanation of the item along with an insurance and possible retail price. You write it down and we move on. That's much quicker and much cheaper for you."
He never offered to take anything off our hands "as a favor to us" or even "If you want, I can try and sell it for you to what we'll get."
In my brother's case, the guy walked him around the shop, pointing out pieces that were attractively priced, but not moving. He said that he had agreements with many of the consignors that allowed him to lower the prices to get things sold. He said that more and more lately, the buyers weren't looking for a good price on quality furniture, they were looking for the cheapest price, period. There is so much of the older stuff on the market, no one is going to pay decent money for any of it. He said that the consignors were often very disappointed at what the piece eventually brought.

This 2014 article is just one of many that discuss the shrinking market for antiques. The market gets even smaller for older pieces that show wear. With the trend towards quality pieces selling at lower prices, no one wants to buy great-grandma's armoire or dresser for anywhere near what the family - or even the appraiser - values it at.
http://www.nytimes.com/2014/10/06/arts/international/a-shift-in-the-antique-market.html

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On Wed, 6 Apr 2016 10:18:53 -0700 (PDT), DerbyDad03

Well you could knock me over with a feather, I wasn't even aware of this.
It would be a great time to restore a period house and furnish it, flip a resto, done properly I think it could restore that whole market and create a market at the same time.
But then come to think of it, I am appalled at what is happening to old homes, like on this olde house where they semi fix up the outside like a resto, then totally hack up the inside.

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On Wednesday, April 6, 2016 at 9:55:38 PM UTC-4, OFWW wrote:

On the other hand, there is something to be said for the look of a period house on the outside and the convenience of a modern home on the inside.
If you are going to live in a house, why not make it work in a way that fits your lifestyle? Would you want to live in a house with 4 small bedrooms and one shared bathroom or would it make more sense to combine 2 bedrooms to create a master with an en suite?
I helped a friend convert the small kitchen and wood storage room of a farmhouse into a huge modern kitchen. We took out a fireplace, dropped the chimney (that's a story undo itself!) removed a wall. Meanwhile, the outside of the house was restored to it's original beauty, including the replacement/repair of 3 brick stoops.
Neither of the interior remodels would match the period of the exterior, by why would you subject yourself to the "inconvenience" of a period interior just to say that you did a complete restoration?

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I'd agree. Times change, people have smaller families, there are appliances that didn't exist 100 years ago, we tend to have more stuff and at the same time don't like the "overfilled" rooms the Victorians were so fond of.
I would say that unless a house is "historic" (e.g. Washington slept there or something) it's better to put it to use than to try and preserve it unchanged.
John
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snipped-for-privacy@ix.netcom.com says...

Apparently we are also taller. Friend of mine had a house built in the 1700s. All the railings and banisters seemed to have been sized for midgets. I'm surprised nobody ever tripped over one and took a header down the stairwell.
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On Tuesday, April 5, 2016 at 7:12:58 AM UTC-7, Jon Danniken wrote:

The original glue was probably hide glue; I'd use that. Clean the hole, then make a new dowel to fit, and reassemble. If the cleanout isn't perfect, it doesn't matter; hide glue sticks to old glue.
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Throw away the old dowel and buy or make a new one, more fitting... you won't have to clean the old one.
As others have said, I vote to use epoxy. You don't have to clamp tight nor have to have a completely snug fit.
Sonny
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On 4/5/2016 9:12 AM, Jon Danniken wrote:

IME, a fit that is "not snug ... but doesn't wiggle" is not that big of an issue.
All you have to do is look at xray's of antiques to see how much "wiggle room" is in some of those still solid joints.
If you really want to do it right, and it is indeed an antique glued with hot hide glue, go with a real hide glue that will bond to itself/reactivate the old glue, or, in lieu thereof, a very specific modern incarnation _specifically_ "Old Brown" glue.
... but NOT one of the "liquid hide glues" on the market that don't have to be heated.
Rockler has it:
http://www.rockler.com/old-brown-glue
If you find yourself using the old fashioned hot hide glue, warming the parts with a dryer, and using the hot glue will most likely reactivate the old glue and likely last another 100 years.
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On Tuesday, April 5, 2016 at 9:12:58 AM UTC-5, Jon Danniken wrote:

If no one else has recommended this, why don't your ream the hole with a drill bit (going up by 1/64th increments until you get solid wood) and turn a new dowel? Then use a very good wood glue and put the piece back together.
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On Tue, 5 Apr 2016 07:12:52 -0700

hide glue mixed with some oak sawdust or cut a groove in the end and then use a wedge and hide glue if you plan on taking it to the antique roadshow talk to a restorer
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