Additional query for pocket/flipper doors and TV sizes for ent ctr

All -
While I am making scratch marks on my graph paper, I got to thinking about HDTV/Flat screen vs. Analog/CRT TV sets.
My friend currently has a standard TV; but my question is, aren't the ratio (HxW) different for HD setups? If so, I want to design the entertainment center so that when/if she does go to a HD setup that the cabinet will accommodate the presumably wider TV set.
I realize that this is a bit of an open ended question, a.k.a., "how much is wood?" Regardless, I would appreciate your input.
Thanks also to Robert for getting me on the right page for pocket vs. flipper door. It's flippers!
TIA
John Moorhead
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HD = 16:9 and CRT is 4:3 ratio
Bob S.

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Close, but not quite accurate. HD is 16:9 but it is available with a CRT. Mine is 36 1/4" wide outside for a 34" screen This is the largest size you can get with a CRT. Anything larger is either plasma or projection type. The same size screen in plasma is about $3500 or so. Ed snipped-for-privacy@snet.net http://pages.cthome.net/edhome
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Ed,
Not inaccurate. The "aspect ratio" is what he asked for and they are as stated, 16:9 and 4:3 - look it up. The physical size you can purchase and the aspect ratio it can display are two different measurements.
Bob S.

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Here's the nitty-gritty, but it isn't going to help you much --
A standard TV image is 4 units wide for 3 units high.
HDTV supports that, _and_ a 'wide screen' format, that is 16 wide, for 9 high.
HDTV _displays_ come in both 'form factors'. Either one can display the 'other' format by either (a) leaving black bands on 2 sides of the image, and/or (b) 'clipping' image to match the display dimensions. method 'a' is the most common.

about the best thing you can do is *ask* him "what's the biggest screen you'd ever consider putting in here?" and _design_ to accommodate that.
With a smaller TV in use, initially, build a simple "surround" to fill up the otherwise 'dead' space -- sort-of like 'matting' an art-print to make it occupy a bigger frame. In fact, art-supply-store "foam board" is not bad stuff to use for the surround. it's lightweight, easy to work, and _cheap_ to replace if/when needed.

Heh. Some days I do a purty good job of mind-reading over the 'net. :)
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There was a good article about building entertainment centers in general in FWW a year or so back. IIRC the author talked about planning for future TVs and other consideration not normally found in a woodworking project.. I'm sure you could find the exact issue at the mag's website.
HTH

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Wide screen HDTV's are 9x16 ratio. A typical 34" CRT set would require a cabinet about 42-45"w x 24"h x 24"d just for the TV and flipper doors. add more height for components as required. Plazma screens are totally different. Best to check specs on line and design to fit.
mike
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Mike wrote:

Forgot to mention - - - weight. I recently bought a 34" HD and got it home, unpacked, ready to go onto the old stand (I'm going to build a new one). My wife and I could not lift it. I had to get my neighbor to come over as I weighs 186 pounds. Build it sturdy.
--
Ed
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Good point. Yes, very heavy. Before I install the TV into the cabinet I first build a temporary platform the same height as the cabinet and then the TV will slide in without damage to the woodwork. Also make sure the wires are correctly attached and accessible. Best to do a trial run with the TV on the temporary stand before the final install. You are not going to want to do it again. I leave the stand with the customer for future use if needed. Needless to say swivels are not recommended.
Mike
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