Adding a post for door jambs in an existing opening


Hello, This isn't exactly what I'd call a woodworking question but it's close enough probably not to offend. I have a reach-in closet with an 8 foot opening that previously housed huge bypass doors. Three of them.... it was a very odd and unfunctional arrangement.
What I am considering is adding a post in the center of the opening and using two sets of double doors. I would lose a bit of closet space from the post but I think it would look great from the room and I can deal with the space loss.
I suspect that you can't just toenail a couple 2x4's in the center to the floor and header and work from there. Can anyone tell me the proper installation of such a post? I'd rather have the openings free of any kind of bracing blocks etc on the floor.
thanks very much ml
Add pictures here
<% if( /^image/.test(type) ){ %>
<% } %>
<%-name%>
Add image file
Upload
snipped-for-privacy@yahoo.com wrote:

...Don't be too sure... :) Actually, it would be far more appropriate in alt.home.repair or some such...
...snip description of 8' foot closet door....

Don't see why not although you'll probably need more like 6" or so to make the trim out look "not too skinny" visually.
A little more work but more solid than the toenailing would be to make a pocket for the support to sit in. To do both ends would require being able to either cheat just a little on the header by adding a thin piece on the surface on either side to create the pocket or boring clear on through to be able to insert both ends or making a built-up piece in place. You could also pocket the floor end and inset a couple angle brackets at the top if you have no extra clearance or ...there are almost an infinite number of variations on how to skin this particular cat.
Add pictures here
<% if( /^image/.test(type) ){ %>
<% } %>
<%-name%>
Add image file
Upload

Right - the load of what's above the opening is already taken into account with whatever's under the sheetrock. Pull the old door track, "X" the carpet and pad and put in your new post.
--
Owen Lowe
The Fly-by-Night Copper Company
  Click to see the full signature.
Add pictures here
<% if( /^image/.test(type) ){ %>
<% } %>
<%-name%>
Add image file
Upload
Fly-by-Night CC wrote:

...
The load to be concerned about isn't vertical, it's the side load of what could <possibly> be a fairly heavy door...
I should note that OP shouldn't cut through the whole bottom of the header if he does decide on the inset pocket route...
Add pictures here
<% if( /^image/.test(type) ){ %>
<% } %>
<%-name%>
Add image file
Upload

ahh it becomes clear to me now. with 6" it's easy enough to just build a tiny wall and nail the plates firmly to the floor and header. perhaps overbuilt but it's cheap enough not to care. That will certainly support the weight of the doors hung on jambs attached to the outer (in this case only) studs of the "wall". A couple of firestop kinda pieces and it will be solid as a rock.
thanks for the help!
cheers ml
Add pictures here
<% if( /^image/.test(type) ){ %>
<% } %>
<%-name%>
Add image file
Upload
snipped-for-privacy@yahoo.com wrote:

...
Sketch it out the way you envision it to see how it looks before commit to sawing...but, as you note, there's still another way for the cat...
Remember to double up the two outer jamb studs for sufficient stiffness or block in between sufficiently so it won't bow over time....
Add pictures here
<% if( /^image/.test(type) ){ %>
<% } %>
<%-name%>
Add image file
Upload

If you'll be covering the post with sheetrock and/or wood trim, you could probably use a couple of metal post brackets to strongly fasten each end of the post. Check out the metal brackets at any home center where the joist hangers are located. You'll surely find something you can use.
Anthony
Add pictures here
<% if( /^image/.test(type) ){ %>
<% } %>
<%-name%>
Add image file
Upload

HomeOwnersHub.com is a website for homeowners and building and maintenance pros. It is not affiliated with any of the manufacturers or service providers discussed here. All logos and trade names are the property of their respective owners.