Actual Woodworking

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I have started a job for a customer, 2 walnut curio cabinets.
What they should look like,
http://www.flickr.com/photos/lcb11211/11863453395/
One of 4 lower side panels
http://www.flickr.com/photos/lcb11211/11864320296/
The panel glue up for the raised panel doors
http://www.flickr.com/photos/lcb11211/11863780993/
The raised panel door dry fit
http://www.flickr.com/photos/lcb11211/11863922504/
The fit inside the dry fit lower cabinet
http://www.flickr.com/photos/lcb11211/11863787413/
And the outside of the dry fit lower cabinet
http://www.flickr.com/photos/lcb11211/11863790753/
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Leon wrote:

You take Most-Excellent pictures, Leon! : )

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"Mike Marlow" wrote:

------------------------------------- Probably at the Ye Old Clamp Store.
Lew
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Really nice grain on those panels. Will be very nice looking units.
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On 1/10/2014 12:28 AM, snipped-for-privacy@none.com wrote:

I hope so. ;`)
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On Thursday, January 9, 2014 8:16:30 PM UTC-6, Leon wrote:

Looking good!
Asking everyone.... Is there a preference, these days, for the type of glass, plate or tempered, to be used in such cabinets? I know there are code requirements in/for home construction, but recently I've wondered about considerations or preferences for such cabinets.
I have some small bathroom corner cabinets in the works and I was thinking to use tempered glass, though it isn't required (to my knowledge).
Somewhat related: I'm aware there are cabinet glass doors (no wooden frame) that are tempered. Is this a requirement or a practical preference? *Understanding differnet locales having different requirements.
Sonny
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Depends on what you're building and/or where the glass is going to be used. For cabinet work such as entertainment centers, I have a preference for 3/8" acrylic, usually a darkened colour. It's much lighter than glass and easier to work.
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On 1/10/2014 5:28 AM, Sonny wrote:

Thank you
The glass except for the mirror on the back side will be tempered, about $20 more per piece of glass in this situation. IIRC the 1/4" thick glass shelves will not be.
Basically it is a good choice if there will be any chance of kids or pets coming in contact withe the glass.
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Great pictures of a nice piece.
appreciate the accuracy, the sharp lines, oh, and the clean shop..... wow. john
"Leon" wrote in message
I have started a job for a customer, 2 walnut curio cabinets.
What they should look like,
http://www.flickr.com/photos/lcb11211/11863453395/
One of 4 lower side panels
http://www.flickr.com/photos/lcb11211/11864320296/
The panel glue up for the raised panel doors
http://www.flickr.com/photos/lcb11211/11863780993/
The raised panel door dry fit
http://www.flickr.com/photos/lcb11211/11863922504/
The fit inside the dry fit lower cabinet
http://www.flickr.com/photos/lcb11211/11863787413/
And the outside of the dry fit lower cabinet
http://www.flickr.com/photos/lcb11211/11863790753/
Add pictures here
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On 1/10/2014 9:52 AM, jloomis wrote:

Well, Thank you, and thank you, John!
I religiously use my dust collector and sweep up at the end of each day.
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Leon wrote:

Leon, It appears that you will rabbet the base pieces (or that you "effectively" rabbeted them by attaching "ledges" that run their length, and I'm sure you used corner bracing. I was thinking if you used ledges, then it would be easier to reinforce--with say "+"-shaped bracing with an overlapping joint in the middle, or maybe even better, a "X"-shaped bracing with an overlapping joint in the middle. Am I close, or would it be better for me to wait for the picture (providing you are willing to share that information)?
Bill

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On 1/10/2014 2:52 PM, Bill wrote:

Ok, yes, the front/back face frames and side panels will be joined by a rabbet joint running along the length of the front and back face frames sides.
The square assembled unit will be held square and reinforced by the dadoed in 3/4" thick plywood bottom. Each side has a dado in the bottom rails to accept the bottom panel.
Often a picture is worth a thousand words.
This shot shows the dados at the bottom of the front/back face frames and the rabbet on the side edges. Clocked 90 degrees in the picture.
http://www.flickr.com/photos/lcb11211/11889144346/in/photostream/
The first, back face frame, in the picture shows the inside side of the back face frame. The next face frame, in line, is the outside side of the back face frame. Notice that I used lap joints to form a recess for the back panel to fit into. these joints are reinforced with 5mm Dominoes.
The next two face frames are the front face frames. Nothing special with the joinery on those except that they are butt joints reinforced by Dominoes.
The backs of the side panels, dry fit before inserting the panels and glue up.
Now if you noticed that none of the face frames and or side panels bottom rail dado's go through the side stiles, I later completed the dado's on both ends on all face frames and side panels. I cooked up a unique way to cut those out accurately, cleanly, and quite quickly. I could have cut the dado's in the stiles before assembly but alignment would have had to be perfect. Cutting them after glue up insures perfect alignment.
Here is a shot of the completed dado's that the bottom will fit into. I have also applied the first coat of varnish to the inside sides before assembly. This really makes varnishing the inside of the cabinet easier.
http://www.flickr.com/photos/lcb11211/11888682455/
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Oops!

http://www.flickr.com/photos/lcb11211/11888311895/in/photostream/
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Leon wrote:

Probably SOP to you, quite "clever" to me!

Nice (and efficient) way to help get structural integrity.

Thank you very much for providing a lesson! I don't think Michael Fortune could do any better. I'm always impressed when I see wonderful techniques, and maybe I shouldn't be so surprised when they are revealed, but that keeps me coming back for more!
Bill

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On 1/9/2014 8:16 PM, Leon wrote:
The glue up and a few clamps. If i had roome I would have used more clamps. ;~) 22 clamps counting the spring clamps to hold the cauls in place.
http://www.flickr.com/photos/lcb11211/11891594166/in/photostream/
http://www.flickr.com/photos/lcb11211/11890758245/in/photostream/
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http://www.flickr.com/photos/lcb11211/11896092103/
http://www.flickr.com/photos/lcb11211/11895780955/
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"Leon" wrote in message
http://www.flickr.com/photos/lcb11211/11896092103/
http://www.flickr.com/photos/lcb11211/11895780955/
Leon... Looked at all the photos. What do you do in your spare time??? WW
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On 1/11/2014 6:01 PM, WW wrote:

Honey do's
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On 1/11/2014 6:34 PM, Leon wrote:

Nice as always.
--
Jeff

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On 1/11/2014 7:00 PM, woodchucker wrote:

Thank you
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