Accurate Router Guide opinion wanted.

I've been thinking of getting it and was wondering what your opinions of it was. Thanks
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Should work just fine but two pieces of wood and a pattern bit is simpler and cheaper. Also, as you don't have to account for the fence to router bit offset, less prone to error.

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I mostly use CW's method and but sometimes use the edge guide that came with my router. For the ultimate indulgence try a microfence (http://www.microfence.com /). Pat Warner (www.patwarner.com) also has a nice one (much cheaper than the microfence). Click on one of the Edge Guide links on the left side of his web page.
Of course there are the tracks that are used for panels - they have attachments for routers or circular saws. I think a representative one is made by Tru-Grip (www.trugrip.com). I use a straight piece of wood, manually keep the tool next to the edge, and then cleanup any mistakes later. Might even cut a little large and then trim with table saw.
Will wrote:

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Never Enough Money wrote:

I have used those TruGrip fences for years. They're great. You just need to be careful on thinner material as they can buckle the panel quite easily, as they are very powerful clamps. On straight work, I use a square router base. Much better than a round one when following a fence.
Pattern bits are the # 1 choice if you're going to go around curves etc. I make (assemble) my own pattern bits.
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RE: Subject
It's a cute toy; however, it's tough to be a good straight edge and a pattern bit.
SFWIW, have the fancy handy dandy Porter Cable edge guide that came as part of a package.
It has been collecting dust for about 10 years.
Lew
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On Sun, 31 Dec 2006 06:56:16 GMT, Lew Hodgett

Add a wood rail stop or second edge guide to the other side of the edge guide's "sticks" and you own a simple, fantastic mortising tool. <G>
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I'm not shy about dropping the coin on good tools, but...
My edge guides are simply strips of tempered hardboard glued and brad nailed to a jointed board. The exposed hardboard needs to be at least as wide as the distance from edge of the router base to the bit. The first cut trims the hardboard to the exact width, and after that, you always know where the cut will be. The edge of hardboard is simply aligned with the cut mark as the guide is clamped to the work. With a Sharpie, write the bit, router, and base you used on the jig for next time. Optionally, you can rub some wax or spray some Top Cote where the router rides.
I use these jigs for routers, circular saws, and jig saws. They're cheap, easy, and fast to make up on the spot, and work fantastic for crosscutting table tops or anything else that won't ride a saw.
When routing dados, I like two boards, as CW mentioned, with the distance set with an actual piece of stock. Put board #1 on the line & clamp, squeeze the sample stock against board #2 and clamp, remove the sample stock, rout with a pattern bit.
Once you own a good pattern bit (or 5, as you'll need assorted diameters and lengths... <G>), you can whip out identical parts, radius or square corners, etc... with ease using hardboard or MDF patterns.
Double sided carpet tape is fantastic for attaching guides and patterns to the work when clamps can't be used.
With the money you save not buying the guide, buy GOOD pattern bits, like Whiteside, CMT, etc... They tend to get used a bunch once you own them and plywood glue can be tough on edges.
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Will wrote:

If it's straight line stuff - the Micro-Fence. REAL handy if you're doing straight inlays. The inlay material is seldom the width specified - what with it being wood. The router bit is seldom EXACTLY its nomional size. Being able to start with an undersized bit and widening things to match the inlay width either EXACTLY or with a thousandth or two extra for glue - THAT'S NICE!
If the radius of the curves aren't too tight - again the Micro-Fence.
Want to make longer radius curved parts that fit together perfectly? Micro-Fence.
And if you want the same level of precision in your depth of cut - get the Micro Fence trim router plunge base - same control over precision.
Miciro-Fence also has an adapter that will let you use a longer edge guide - Clamp 'N Guide specifically.
charlie b
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