Accuracy of Compound Mitre Saws

Page 2 of 2  
Wes wrote:

tooth crosscut blade and the chipout problem was solved.
Glen
Add pictures here
<% if( /^image/.test(type) ){ %>
<% } %>
<%-name%>
Add image file
Upload
Wes wrote:

Add pictures here
<% if( /^image/.test(type) ){ %>
<% } %>
<%-name%>
Add image file
Upload
Wes wrote:

I have the same saw, but I added a zero clearance insert and a Freud 80 tooth blade and I no longer have the chipout problem.
Glen
Add pictures here
<% if( /^image/.test(type) ){ %>
<% } %>
<%-name%>
Add image file
Upload
Wes wrote:

I have the same saw, but I added a zero clearance insert and a Freud 80 tooth blade and I no longer have the chipout problem.
Glen
Add pictures here
<% if( /^image/.test(type) ){ %>
<% } %>
<%-name%>
Add image file
Upload

I've got the 705. Spent $50 on the DeWalt 80T blade, and it got much better. Kept the old blade for the tubafors, etc.
Anything for really fine work gets done on the tablesaw, but the CMS gets used for almost every shop session and project. Money well spent.
Patriarch
Add pictures here
<% if( /^image/.test(type) ){ %>
<% } %>
<%-name%>
Add image file
Upload
"patriarch

I had my original blade re-sharpened by Ridge Carbide Tool. Cuts better now than when it was new. I also planed on upgrading, but the sharpening was enough for me. Ed
Add pictures here
<% if( /^image/.test(type) ){ %>
<% } %>
<%-name%>
Add image file
Upload

most of the week ripping up the old subfloor (pet problems), and (the most dangerous words a homeowner can speak) 'while we're at it', stiffening the floor joist systems in the living and family rooms. The table saw blade I used needs sharpening, and the CMS blades could almost certainly use a tune up. I'm thinking that the framing saw blade is disposable.
All this work, and only one new tool - a reciprocating saw. But today, my wife said the magic words: "all those tools certainly came in handy. I hate to think what we would have had to pay a contractor to do all of that." Friends, there may be a new jointer in my near future...
Patriarch
Add pictures here
<% if( /^image/.test(type) ){ %>
<% } %>
<%-name%>
Add image file
Upload
| Friends, there may be a new jointer in my near future...
We live in hope.
Add pictures here
<% if( /^image/.test(type) ){ %>
<% } %>
<%-name%>
Add image file
Upload
You didn't specify an accuracy level so the answer has to be yes, no, maybe.

Add pictures here
<% if( /^image/.test(type) ){ %>
<% } %>
<%-name%>
Add image file
Upload
Sun, Jul 4, 2004, 5:07pm (EDT+4) snipped-for-privacy@ntlworld.com (GaryDean) claims: I am very tempted to buy myself a compound mitre saw <snip>
You didn't mean "sliding", and just left that out, did you?
is it possible to achieve absolute accuracy with a mitre saw
Yes. "Probable" now, is a different mater.
and if so and where, on the scale of cheap-and-cheerful to money-no-object-of-the-range can one expect to achieve the accuracy I am looking for?
Depends. You can get a high price one that is off, or an el cheapo that is right on.
Any recommendations will be gratefully received.
Pick one you like, and can afford, and check it out. Make a saw sled, or several. Their setting shouldn't change.
I've got an older Craftsman manual mitre saw, plenty accurate. Ran me around $20, shipping included, on eBay. Used to have a neighbor, who had a lovely cast iron base manual mitre saw, brand unknown, dead accurate. If I could find one of those for sale, I'd pick it up in a heartbeat.
JOAT Just because it's not nice doesn't mean it's not miraculous. - Interesting Times
Add pictures here
<% if( /^image/.test(type) ){ %>
<% } %>
<%-name%>
Add image file
Upload
Gary Dean wrote:

the Dewalt compound or double compound (not sure that's the correct nomenclature) model. I have the compound one it will hold any setting you throw at it. Set the saw, do a test cut, and if ok, the Dewalt will hold the setting indefinitely. Reading the scale is iffy but with practice you'll be able to tell what it's set at.
dave
Add pictures here
<% if( /^image/.test(type) ){ %>
<% } %>
<%-name%>
Add image file
Upload

If absolute accuracy is required, stay away from the Makita 10" sliding compound miter saw. Unless they have changed their design very recently, the pivot pin that goes into the base through the table is a steel pin in the aluminum casting, and it wears the casting hole to an oblong shape. Once that happens, there's no way to fix it (not enough room to put in a bushing, even) and Makita's only suggestion is to keep replacing bases if you care about cut accuracy.
To be fair to the saw, I did build my house using it for all of the hip rafters (2x10 Douglass Fir), so it has some miles on it, but: A) It's only built _one_ house, and B) a design which has such an obvious wear point with no provision for repair, is to be avoided.
Dave Hinz
Add pictures here
<% if( /^image/.test(type) ){ %>
<% } %>
<%-name%>
Add image file
Upload
Yes. I have a 12" DeWalt compound miter saw and it is very accurate. The compound cut is not as accurate as the miter cut. A sliding miter saw is nice to have and more expensive, but I suspect a plain miter saw is less likely to get "out of tune." Stick with the well-known brands (DeWalt, Delta, Porter Cable, Milwaukee, Makita, etc).
wrote:

Add pictures here
<% if( /^image/.test(type) ){ %>
<% } %>
<%-name%>
Add image file
Upload

essential.
Then you need a good used DeWalt RAS!
--
Rumpty

Radial Arm Saw Forum: http://forums.delphiforums.com/woodbutcher/start
  Click to see the full signature.
Add pictures here
<% if( /^image/.test(type) ){ %>
<% } %>
<%-name%>
Add image file
Upload
My 2 cents:
A CMS is great when you want to crosscut long stock that would be too awkward to cut on the TS (like baseboard trim)
For stock < 4' I think a good sled (preferably a couple special-purpose ones) can work just as well and can be built for next to nothing. I would start there.
-Steve

Add pictures here
<% if( /^image/.test(type) ){ %>
<% } %>
<%-name%>
Add image file
Upload
As I just bought one, was curious to read through the thread and see if anybody said more than good/bad. If so, I missed it. I'm also not sure where your cabinet work needs _that_ much accuracy. Further, you've got three different angles to check, and you typically don't need the same accuracy in each. You do, of course, need repeatability, and sometimes that's more important.
Checking my new one, it came in off 6mils/inch from square to the base, and adjusted +/-2mils/inch (inc. blade flatness). You won't get much better than that, and the real question there is repeatability after much use.
As for the bevel angle when tilting, forget accuracy as you can't even read the little marks well enough, and angle blocks are the way to go.
Watch especially instead for comments like Dave's (thanks, DaveHinz) on the Makita slider and the pivot wear. Repeatability and wear are the real issues.
Finally, if you insist on accuracy, get a TsAligner or dial indicator, precision angle blocks and squares. But that's rarely needed unless you're doing wooden machinery.
GerryG

Add pictures here
<% if( /^image/.test(type) ){ %>
<% } %>
<%-name%>
Add image file
Upload

Related Threads

    HomeOwnersHub.com is a website for homeowners and building and maintenance pros. It is not affiliated with any of the manufacturers or service providers discussed here. All logos and trade names are the property of their respective owners.