Abrasive wheel on miter saw

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vaguely proposed a theory ......and in reply I say!:
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vaguely proposed a theory ......and in reply I say!:
remove ns from my header address to reply via email
Yep! Read some (most) of the other posts. Warned ya!
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wrote:

There's are third and fourth issues as well, to wit: Your (I am assuming) wood-oriented miter saw will be full of shavings and metal swarf, which tends to be difficult to get out, and will almost certainly ruin a project eventually. And the other problem is that most abrasive wheels that I have seen are not flat. The arbor hole is sometimes as much as a 1/2" offset from the cutting surface, which may be enough to grind the inside of your guard into smithereens, and will almost certainly cut a wider (or doubled) groove in the base. Most tools are engineered to do only what they were designed for, and cutting metal out of that base plate could very likely cause the entire piece to fail- and if it does, it will almost certainly be when you least want it to.
If you're just going to use it for metal, then give it a try. If you're going to switch it back to wood, I'd be a little concerned about it.

It should work fine. If you have a bench grinder or belt sander, you can always touch it up a bit after you cut. I can't imagine that it would be too tough to make a material-specific miter box out of some scrap if you're not very good at freehanding it.
You could also just overlap the metal. I don't know what you're making, but if it's just shop stands, it works fine.

Go buy a chop saw! :) You know, there are a few other options for doing this job that are a little more appropriate, and you may or may not already have the tools- if you don't, then at least they are a bit cheaper than a dedicated chop saw. The first is a good ol' hacksaw and a vise or miter box. You specified 1" x 1/8" angle iron, and it's actually pretty easy to cut that by hand. If you're set on using a power tool, then why not use an angle grinder? Right now, they're all on sale, and it's a handy tool to have for all sorts of things. I'm assuming that you need mitered corners because you are going to weld the angle iron, and it's nice to have one to clean up the welds before painting anyhow. And if you have a biscut cutter, you've already got one. If you don't, you can buy an attachment to use the angle grinder as a biscut cutter later.
I make all of the stands for my shop tools myself, and they are usually 1018 (weldable) steel angle iron or square tubing. I'll admit, I usually use one of my bandsaws at work for cutting the material, but there have been several times when I wanted to change the design a little and ended up cutting steel in my shop. In those cases, the hacksaw is usually my tool of choice (though I just got a reciprocating saw from my dad for X-mas, so that may change) and it does a fine job- no really, it does. There's a little more elbow grease involved, but it usually takes only a couple of minutes. Heck, I cut up a few 5/8" steel rods for spare tool rests on my lathe last week while my van was warming up before work. It did a fine job, and was much easier than you might think! The other option I could think of is using the course wheel on a bench grinder to chop the angle out. You'll have to dress the wheel afterwards, but it works ok.

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