A weird project - End grain cutting board

Page 1 of 2  
http://www.frontiernet.net/~toller/Cuttingboard.jpg
I glued up two cutting boards out of radom scraps. Then I cut them into 1" pieces, mixed them up, and turned them so that all the end grain was up, and glued them up. About a pint of BLO later...
It looks and feels like smooth formica, except the detail is way beyond what you could get in formica.
I am not sure I like it, but it is interesting.
Add pictures here
<% if( /^image/.test(type) ){ %>
<% } %>
<%-name%>
Add image file
Upload

It does look interesting, but end grain? Won't is suck up anything liquid on it?
Add pictures here
<% if( /^image/.test(type) ){ %>
<% } %>
<%-name%>
Add image file
Upload

No, it is completely saturated with BLO. And I mean competely. If you apply it to the top, some wicks out the bottom. Let it dry a while, apply more, etc. It weights significantly more than the raw wood.
Add pictures here
<% if( /^image/.test(type) ){ %>
<% } %>
<%-name%>
Add image file
Upload

into
liquid
Large butcher cutting "blocks" are built this way
Add pictures here
<% if( /^image/.test(type) ){ %>
<% } %>
<%-name%>
Add image file
Upload
Typically "Chopping" blocks are made this way with the end grain up. For true cutting boards, I've typically seen edge grain showing. Either way, I'm sure it'll work just fine! Cheers, cc

Add pictures here
<% if( /^image/.test(type) ){ %>
<% } %>
<%-name%>
Add image file
Upload

Yes, the endgrain does not dull the blade as quickly as a "cross grain" cutting board. The grain separates a little at the knife edge, kind of like the way a horsehair (or whatever material that is) dartboard does.
dwhite
Add pictures here
<% if( /^image/.test(type) ){ %>
<% } %>
<%-name%>
Add image file
Upload
Dan White wrote:

I believe that would be "boar bristles".
Add pictures here
<% if( /^image/.test(type) ){ %>
<% } %>
<%-name%>
Add image file
Upload

*** No, dartboards are purely vegetable (i.e. sisal fiber), e.g. http://www.dartboards.com/cart/shopper.cfm/action=view/key=ESC003
Add pictures here
<% if( /^image/.test(type) ){ %>
<% } %>
<%-name%>
Add image file
Upload
<snip>

Red oak, and other ring porous woods? Think a bundle of drinking straws...
Patriarch
Add pictures here
<% if( /^image/.test(type) ){ %>
<% } %>
<%-name%>
Add image file
Upload
REAL butcher block has always been endgrain, for wear resistance. Some Japanese blocks are actually a section of hard maple, maybe 4-8" thick and a foot in diameter, just cut straight from the tree and then iron banded like a hot tub to prevent splitting. I have two 2" thick endgrain hard maple boards about 12x18, they do drink oil, but they last forever.
Add pictures here
<% if( /^image/.test(type) ){ %>
<% } %>
<%-name%>
Add image file
Upload
I think it's butt ugly!! But it looks cool in an ugly sort of way and things like that are fun to build...even if you're really not sure if you should give it away (I should know...I have a cupboard full of things that look just like that!)
<g!>
Rob
--


http://www.robswoodworking.com

"toller" < snipped-for-privacy@yahoo.com> wrote in message
  Click to see the full signature.
Add pictures here
<% if( /^image/.test(type) ){ %>
<% } %>
<%-name%>
Add image file
Upload

1"
and
what
I guess there's no accounting for taste, but I kinda like it.
--

-Mike-
snipped-for-privacy@alltel.net
  Click to see the full signature.
Add pictures here
<% if( /^image/.test(type) ){ %>
<% } %>
<%-name%>
Add image file
Upload

http://www.kaswell.com/woodblock/oakplank.htm
tjwatson1ATcomcastDOTnet (real email) http://home.comcast.net/~tjwatson1 (webpage)
Add pictures here
<% if( /^image/.test(type) ){ %>
<% } %>
<%-name%>
Add image file
Upload
<snip>

Not in my house, thank you.
Patriarch
Add pictures here
<% if( /^image/.test(type) ){ %>
<% } %>
<%-name%>
Add image file
Upload
Tom Watson wrote: http://www.kaswell.com/woodblock/oakplank.htm
At the first architectural woodworking shop (Loughman/St. Louis) I worked in the floor in the shop was made from 4 X 6's cut 4"(ish) long and laid on the concrete. It was one of the best surfaces to work on.
UA100
Add pictures here
<% if( /^image/.test(type) ){ %>
<% } %>
<%-name%>
Add image file
Upload

The train museum in Pine Bluff, Arkansas has the same sort of floor. They used that because the end grain is so much tougher than side grain.
Michael
Add pictures here
<% if( /^image/.test(type) ){ %>
<% } %>
<%-name%>
Add image file
Upload
Herman Family wrote:

I think a lot of 19th century factories had end-grain floors.
--RC
Add pictures here
<% if( /^image/.test(type) ){ %>
<% } %>
<%-name%>
Add image file
Upload

yabut, end-grain *plywood*? There's just something wrong about that.
+--------------------------------------------------------------------------------+ The absence of accidents does not mean the presence of safety Army General Richard Cody +--------------------------------------------------------------------------------+
Add pictures here
<% if( /^image/.test(type) ){ %>
<% } %>
<%-name%>
Add image file
Upload
Well.now you have me thinking :)
a 3/4" sheet of plywood ripped into 3/4" pieces and stacked on a floor end grain up will price out to a little over a buck a square foot....and it would be unique :)
Hmm......
Rob
--


http://www.robswoodworking.com

"Mark & Juanita" < snipped-for-privacy@hadenough.com> wrote in message
  Click to see the full signature.
Add pictures here
<% if( /^image/.test(type) ){ %>
<% } %>
<%-name%>
Add image file
Upload
Tom Watson wrote:

So that's why I'm only getting MDF and jummywood dunnage now. Them folks is takin' my 6x6 oak timbers and turnin' 'em into some decidedly not terribly attractive flooring.
--
Michael McIntyre ---- Silvan < snipped-for-privacy@users.sourceforge.net>
Linux fanatic, and certified Geek; registered Linux user #243621
  Click to see the full signature.
Add pictures here
<% if( /^image/.test(type) ){ %>
<% } %>
<%-name%>
Add image file
Upload

Site Timeline

Related Threads

    HomeOwnersHub.com is a website for homeowners and building and maintenance pros. It is not affiliated with any of the manufacturers or service providers discussed here. All logos and trade names are the property of their respective owners.