A walk-along circular saw plywood ripper.

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A walk-along circular saw plywood ripper. I put a 4 foot handle on a circular saw. It was attached to a plywood plate and a right angle edge, that positions the blade exactly 10" from a ripping guide.
I can rip plywood sitting on 2x4's on the floor by just walking along guiding the circular saw against the guide. Just like using a lawn edger.
Very accurate, safe, and convenient.
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Holy Cow! Where would one even start with this comment? I'm no safety nazi, but even I wouldn't be doing this.
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-Mike-
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I thought about it for a bit, and I think I visually understand what the OP was describing. It doesn't seem unsafe, or more unsafe than using the saw normally.
The jig the OP described was a piece of wood that his circular saw sits on, with a handle from the wood piece up. With the saw on the 2x4s just above the floor, he can walk next to it controlling it from the handle.
Something like this: _/
If the saw was to hit a hard object and kick back, the saw itself would probably be flying. Chances are, if it hits you it'd hit your legs. (So wear shin guards. Doesn't everyone keep a pair next to their tools?) Negative marks if the OP didn't connect a switch to the handle so he can shut the saw off there. Another risk would be the saw hits something and the handle jerks suddenly. You could injure your wrist in this case. However, when was the last time you saw a saw jump and twist like a drill that got stuck?
Thus far, it doesn't really seem like the jig is that unsafe. Opinions either way?
Puckdropper
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I thought about it too, before I posted. Putting a circular saw on the end of a 3 or 4 foot stick is just plain stupid. No other way around it. What kind of control do you really think you can exert over that saw with this kind of extension? You've never had a circular saw jump, or attempt to jump in your hand? If not, all I can say is you have not used a circular saw very much.
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Mr. Marlow:
Please clarify your comments. I was unable to understand your somewhat clouded point of view on this subject.
I would like to read your "clarifications" when I pick myself up off the floor where I fell off my chair from laughing so hard.
Come on, Mike. What were you >>really<< thinking?
"Eschew obfuscation" is a phrase you could have written!
Robert
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I'm often accused of being too timid to express my real feelings on a matter....
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Mike Marlow wrote:

Sounds to me like someone is preparing for a run at the Darwin Awards.
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"Doug Winterburn wrote:

Touche.
Lew
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Exactly.
You start with a clear floor.
Place 4 2x4's flat on the floor..
1 on each of the long sides to support the width of the 4x8 sheet.
Place the other 2 on either side of the line to be cut.
The middle 2 support the cut boards and prevent pinching the blade when the cut is almost complete.
Use a plate about 50% longer than the circular saw plate
Plug the circular saw into your extension handle that has its own on/ off switch.
The spring-loaded saw safety remain fully functional.
Set the depth of cut beyond the new plate less than 1-1/2" to avoid hitting the floor.
I use a clamped on Stanley rip cutting jig.
Works like a charm!
Thanks for your comment.
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What stops the 2x4's from binding?
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Robatoy wrote:

Why would they bind? They aren't being cut, just supporting the panel.
If I'm using a power hand saw to cut a panel I do it exactly the same way...support the panel at/near the edges and on both sides of where I want to cut. Doesn't everyone?
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dadiOH
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Exactly!
Some just don't get it.
Besides, would you rather lose a toe or a finger?
Clarification: The extended handle is at an angle.
I am walking about 2 feet behind the blade.
The trigger is held by my finger.
(A secondary safety in series pressure switch could be installed should the saw plate rise from the board)
[not a bad idea for all saws]
Assuming that the saw kicks back or rises, the guard would be in place before the saw would reach me.
Thanks for your inputs.
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What I don't get is, instead of building a long handle thingee with a trigger on it so you can bend over and set your plywood on two by fours, why not build this table instead? http://thewoodshop.20m.com/panel_cutting_table.htm
When you've built the long handle with a trigger on it, you've built a gadget that has one use only. I'm not sure from the description but it sounds like putting it on and taking it off is fairly complicated task.
The panel cutting table gets the panel up where it's easy to work, handles a full sheet of ply very well, has many other uses, is really cheap and quick to build, and it stores easily.
There's lots of ways to do it and I'm not saying you shouldn't do it your way but I have to admit it makes me a little nervous, even with the trigger on it.
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The point is not to have to lift heavy plywood sheets.
I have the sheets standing agaist a wall.
I just let one fall over onto the 2x4's. Cut them where they fall.
It takes 2 screws and nuts to mount the plywood plate using 2 holes already in the saw plate.
(Countersunk from below. Also chamfer the front edge for ease of sliding)
No table to build, store, or setup. Just store 4-2x4's.
What advantage is there cutting at 3 feet higher than the floor?
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You could buy one sheet of 1 or 2" thick polystyrene or Styrofoam and eliminate the 2x4s. Nice idea.
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Well, there's your back. And you have to carry the plywood to wherever you store it, so whatever method you use, carrying plywood is part of the process. And you have to bend down and set up the guide. And you have to bend down and set up the saw. And then you have to pick up the pieces. And then you have to pick up the 2x4's. Bend over, bend over, bend over, bend over.
You can tilt the table on its side (as they show in the article you didn't read), lean the plywood against it, and then just tilt it back up. It's easy ans it's simple to set up the guide exactly where I need it.
The advantage to cutting three feet higher than the floor is that you have more control. That's where your eyes and hands, which you use to control the tool, are. That's where it feels most comfortable. Your method sounds much less comfortable.
As I said, you can do it your way. I think it's a single use gadget where the table is multi use, doesn't require modifying the saw, doesn't require unmodifying the saw after I'm done and is safer but if you're happy with it, by all means have fun.
You'll let us know if there's any accidents, right? :-)
As an aside, if either of us got hurt for any reason while we were cutting our plywood, which one of us would have to lie to collect the insurance?
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Neither, but I am willing to bet that keeping feet and hands further away from from the blade is safer than up close.
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I would like to see pictures of this extension device.
Once, when cutting Hardi Board Siding ( a lot ) I discovered that wet boards (thanks to some inclement weather) cut smoother, quieter and with little or no dust (the dust cutting dry boards with a Skill Saw is phenomenal). So the wife and I formed a cutting team, she spritzing the board in front of the blade from a spray bottle filled with water - popi cutting with the saw.
Then, with lots more boards to go, I bought some 1/4" polyethylene tubing, a bit of 1/4" copper, a valve to fit between and join the two and a fitting to join the 1/4" poly to the garden hose.
At one end of the copper tubing, i place a small brad nail, then hammered the tubing flat over it before removeing eh nail - forming a nozzle, if you will. Then, I formed the copper alng the fixed blade guard of my older skill saw so that the nozzle end of the tubing could be set to squirt just before the cut and fastened the whole thing to the guard with pop rivets and some wire restraining bits I had laying about,
Now, to cut, I turned on the hose a bit, the opened the little valve and cut.
No dust at all. Smooth, easy cutting with significantly less noise - no more than cutting PT 2 by stock.
Later I heard about mounting the blade backwards and much later saw the four tooth blades sold for this purpose. Bet they'd work better with water added.
Just thought the safety-conscious guys on the list would love this water, power tool, electricity and sharp object combination. Yous, somewhere - I have pictures.
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wrote:

You're probably right on that aspect.
My worry would be more towards the lack of mechanical advantage if a bind were encountered. The spinning blade could jump out of the kerf and go skidding around, ruining an expensive sheet of stock.
It doesn't take much to destroy the .000000001" thick veneer on current cabinet grade ply.
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Actually there is more of a mechanical advantage due to leverage plus the weight of the operator standing over the extended saw handle.
My plywood is not cabinet grade, it is more like dog-house grade.
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