A TIP that may save you a lot of grief

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I didn't discover this stuff - Michael Fortune did - and share this tip in one of his woodworking show classes.
If you've spent hours cleaning up Glue Squeeze Out,
If you've dinged a piece scraping off Glue Squeeze Out,
If you discovered that you hadn't gotten rid of ALL the Gkue Squeeze Out - unitl you began applying your finish -and then had it pop out like a sore thumb,
Here's a tip that will make all that GO AWAY - honest.
http://web.hypersurf.com/~charlie2/EntryHall/Waxilit.html
Your very welcome.
charlie b
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charlieb wrote:

Might be better, but I've been using Trewax for the same purpose for many years. Since I don't use water based finish, any remaining wax is not a problem, and the normal wipedown with mineral spirits to detect glue spots will remove the wax anyway.
--
It's turtles, all the way down

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What I do is put the first coat of finish on the pieces after they visible surfaces have been cut but before the jointing surfaces (mortices, tenons, etc) are cut. Of course, my "finish" is usually plain poly, so I don't have to worry about stain.
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Met him a few months back at a Lee Valley seminar he was holding on bending wood. Very knowledgeable guy and a very accomplished teacher.
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I presume you have used the product. Does it dry and or is it easy to see when dry?
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Leon wrote:

Yes I have.
Yes it dries - starts out the consistency of vasoline - but white.
It's white when it dries - almost chalk white. Shows up on just about any wood I can think of - including english walnut which has to be one of the whitest, blandest woods around.
charlie b
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Great, I'll have to try some out. Lot's cheaper that the last thing you bought that I also bought. ;~)
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wrote:

Since when was walnut white?
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Andy Dingley wrote:

You're thinking "black" or Claro walnut. English walnut out here in Nor Cal was grafted on black walnut mainly - the root system of the latter apparently is much hardier than english but has smaller nuts with thicker shells.
Have posted a pick of three cups I turned from what I know is English Walnut - in a.b.p.w. subject line: English Walnut Examples for Andy D
charlie b
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So "English" in this context means anything but "from England" ? Walnut in England is dark-brown or red.
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No, I'm thinking of English walnut, from England -- which is Juglans regia not J. nigra, and a warm slightly-reddish brown rather than white.
There's a lot of colour variation in the world's walnuts and I've never personally been a fan of the "stripey" nature of much US walnut (judging it from photos of finished items). I've never seen any though that I'd even describe as "pale", let alone "white".

Thanks, when I get back to a computer that can access the binaries groups, I'll take a look.
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Andy Dingley wrote:

Butternut is often described as "white walnut" - maybe that's what the OP was talking about.
--
It's turtles, all the way down

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I had looked at purchasing Waxilit from LV last year but they only sell it during certain times of the year IIRC (something to do with temperatures). I typically do all my finishing before assembly so it probably wouldn't buy me much until now. I've pretty much put yellow glue at the back of the shelf and am using plastic resin glue almost 100% now and although it does come off of finish, it can still stick pretty good. So, thanks for the affirmation Charlie. I'll order some! Cheers, cc
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A good tip, save even more and use Johnson's or Minwax paste wax @ $5-6 for a pound can.
--
There is always an easy solution to every human problem -- neat,
plausible, and wrong." (H L Mencken)
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But those dry clear and are hard to see. I would prefer something that is obvious if you have not removed all of it.
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Charlie, and any one else that may be interested in a larger quantity at a considerable discount in price per ounce, take a look here.
http://www.asapwoodworking.com/index.cfm?reftID &refID4&tnm=weinig%20lubricants%20and%20cleansers
1.6 gallons for $38.00 or a whole lot more for triple the 7 oz. price.
I ordered the 7 oz can from LV for starters to see how good it is. Apparently it is great for lubricating surfaces also.
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############## Here are some ideas on glue choices http://tinyurl.com/29gsxr
Smitty ####################################

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Leon wrote:

http://www.asapwoodworking.com/index.cfm?reftID &refID4&tnm=weinig%20lubricants%20and%20cleansers
If you're going to use it for making glue squeeze out clean up easier a 7 0z can is going to last a LONG time. Michael Fortune had a toothpaste tube size of the stuff he'd been working on for years. Doesn't take much to wok.
As I pointed out in my original post about Waxilit - it was developed to lubricate - and project - cast iron tables for the wood processing industry.
charlie b
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Yeah, I thought I'd try it out to see if it is better than TopCote as I am almost out of TopCote. I recall you indicating that it was for machined surfaces also. I found from visiting various sites and comments from customers that the stuff is "great" for lubing surfaces. I got a lot more positive feed back than the usual "works for me" answer concerning most waxes that are used for that purpose.
I was also thinking that if the stuff is as good on machined surfaces as indicated that 1.6 gallons would be a load to buy and maybe some one local may want to share the purchase. Hint, Hint. ;~) Although the room that 1.6 gallons takes up is more of a deterrent than the actual price.
Thanks again for sharing this little jewel.
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I understand that Waxilit has no silicone in it which would affect wood finishing. However, even a wax product can effect the finishing of wood if it's not removed properly. What do you use to remove any of it that manages to find itself on an unfinished wood surface ~ some type of alcohol based product?
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