a relatively dumb question i'm sure...

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wrote:

An example would be to drill holes in several pieces, quickly and accurately..
I use a simple jig for my biscuit jointer when I do things like drawer sides, etc.. Just makes it easier and faster than measuring, marking and lining up each slot..
"Jig" one of those words like "love", that mean different things to different folks.. Some consider a temporary fence on a band saw a jig, some don't..
I consider the pocket hole guides to be jigs, so I guess being built in your shop isn't required to qualify for the title jig?
If all else fails, it's a dance you do in a Irish pub after several adult beverages..
mac
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In article <a1f7b9e6-8a27-4b32-9ad6-
snipped-for-privacy@gmail.com says...

Well, that's been covered a lot by others.
Jigs are also used for very large items. Laying out the pieces for roof trusses: So they all come out identical, and nobody needs to check the angles: you cut all the bits to length, put them on the jig where they are held in place by delimiters and whack your nailplates on. That's one production line example; in fact I've built jigs like that on a couple of building sites myself.
And to make runs of items: Chair making. You usually don't make one chair. You might want to make a set of 6. So you make one jig for a certain piece or joint, then use that to make [bits for] 6 identical chairs with a lot more accuracy and considerable time savings, because you don't have to mark and measure each individual piece (twice at least- remember: measure twice, cut once). So ...
-P.
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*snip*

Does it matter which order you do the measuring and cutting in? I like to measure, cut, and measure again... That's how to do it, right?
Puckdropper
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On 03 Jul 2008 09:44:42 GMT, Puckdropper <puckdropper(at)yahoo(dot)com> wrote:

I think the proper order is: measure measure again cut measure/fit cuss on the way to the lumber yard..
mac
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snipped-for-privacy@davisbajasplinters.com says...

Even just all the way to the lumber rack is bad enough.
Heh. -P.
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http://groups.google.com/group/rec.woodworking/browse_frm/thread/4b54ee7701457688/edaf582676413cc9?lnk=st&q=#edaf582676413cc9
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There are three fairly closely related terms involved and I'm going to give you my understanding of what they mean. This in no way attempts to define each of the items - this is simply how I use the terms.
A TEMPLATE is made of an item whose shape needs to be transferred to another place for cutting. Think of a sink TEMPLATE. It is usually a one off.
A JIG is a short term FIXTURE that allows you to repeat things like cuts and drilling points. A JIG is not made as well as a FIXTURE because it is specific to the current job, rather than being something that is relevant to many different jobs.
A FIXTURE is a JIG that can be used over multiple jobs. An example of a FIXTURE would be one that gave you a PATTERN for how to drill cabinet doors a certain distance from the top and the bottom, and a certain distance in from the edge. In my usage of the term it would also clamp you in so that your drilling would be more accurate.
All FIXTURES are JIGS but not all JIGS are FIXTURES.
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wrote:

And some fixtures turn water on and off... Turn the wrong one in the shower, and you dance a jig..
Sorry Tom, couldn't help it.. lol
mac
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Can one make a fixture with a JIGsaw?
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The dictionary definition is that a jig controls the motion or location of a tool; a fixture controls the location of a workpiece.
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For one hole, no jig necessary. for 100 holes, a jig makes sense.
scott
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On Thu, 03 Jul 2008 01:03:03 GMT, snipped-for-privacy@slp53.sl.home (Scott Lurndal) wrote:

I built a TS jig last week to cut slots in the end of four 3/4" dowels..
I figured that it was more efficient to drill 4 holes in a 2x4 scrap than risk cutting fingers off.. One pass through the saw and the dowels were nicely cut and the 2x4 was in the firewood pile..
mac
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To muddy the waters a bit, and maybe anticipate your next question, try this page
http://www.woodworkinghistory.com/glossary_J_jig.htm
You can go up to the "Glossary" area of this page and read about "patterns", "fixtures", "templates" and so on.
charlie b
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