A 'puter in your shop?

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I'm wondering about having a computer in my shop. I've got a older machine that is sitting around doing nothing - and its long paid for, and of no value to anyone. So I'm thinking of putting in the shop at some point - for email, surfing, etc.
I'd like to know what you've done to "protect" yours if you've got one out there - ie - seperate room, dust covers etc?
Also - what kind of connection to the net do you have - if any? Am toying with a wireless ethernet card to talk to the router in the house, once our high speed access is installed. The alternative is to dig more trench.....
Thanks
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I've been lurking here for a few months and after making my first post only a few min. ago I feel kind of strange about posting this but this seems a fairly flame free group. I ran a rj45 cable when the shop was built.but wireless could be a problem due to elec. interference and large metal equip between the computer and ant. as far as the computer is concerned you should put a air filter at the inlet probably at the front and blow it out weekly. I also bought a keyless keyboard off e-bay for about $15 no problems so far.
Keith

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"keyless keyboard"..........saves on typing I suppose eh Keith<grin>
Dave

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Would a keyless keyboard work well with the 512Meg write only memory (WOM) chip set that Santa left?
DexAZ

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wrote:

Yup! Very handy for Googling for a technique or ideas, and for streaming archived radio shows into the shop.

A simple cloth cover, I don't leave it running all the time, so the cover will keep most dust out of it. I'm not all that concerned, no data is stored on it and it's a cheapie, so if it croaks, so be it. I have a DC and air filtration system, so my shop is relatively clean in the first place. The computer is also located at the farthest point possible from the major dust producers.

A wired connection back to my DSL router on the second floor of my home. The shop machine can print to the office, and all data is stored on our main machine and accessed remotely from the rest of the network. The DSL router has a built-in hardware firewall, and all machines run full versions of Zone Alarm and anti-virus software. I have 5 machines networked up, and it's awesome.
A side benefit to the network is that you can backup critical data to other machines, and share printers, scanners, camera connections, etc...
Wireless is very simple and requires less manual labor to install, while wires are generally faster, cheaper and more secure by default. If you go wireless, spend the time to properly secure the network, some are less than secure right out of the box.
Barry
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My server is right outside the door to my shop, but like most tinkerers, you gotta have the toys, so I wanted a pc in the shop. Ran a cat5 cable out to the shop off the router, dropped an old Pentium with wireless mouse and keyboard, shared all the resources. Being an old techie I was able to "borrow" an acoustic cabinet with three fans on the back, but I still only power it up when I need to look something up.
Dave
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"Jim Laumann" wrote in message

My life became increasingly computer based starting in 1983, so I'm normally trying to get away from the damn things, and thus far I've been able to resist putting a computer in the shop. I do take frequent breaks and go to the house to check e-mail and, of course, the wRECK ... which can be a big mistake.
--
www.e-woodshop.net
Last update: 1/02/04
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tell meabout it.......
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I have a PC in my shop (MP3 player). It has survived 4 years of heat, humidity, sawdust and a fire. The monitor is actually outside in the tiki bar.
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So you can see it while soaking in the hot tub, right?
DexAZ
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Soaking in the hot tub you just listen to the songs ;-)
The monitor is only for looking at play lists. Left alone it will just random play through the library. I have a Seeburg 3W1 wallbox out there that selects songs. That is the keyboard input. This is DOS/MPXPLAY software with a dual boot W/95 drive for maintenance with long file names. There are similar machines in our cars (no monitor and num pads). These routinely crank up in a 140 degree ambient temp car and work just fine. Anyone who thinks computers are delicate are mistaken.
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Greg wrote:

Older machines were a lot less sensitive to heat. My 1 GHz Athlon just barely stays cool enough to function with the standard CPU fan, in a controlled environment that doesn't get warmer than 80 F. If I run seti@home or other such that keep it running at 100% capacity around the clock, it overheats and locks up eventually.
In contrast, the power supply fan on my old P166 went out, leaving the CPU fan as the only source of cooling. That thing got hot enough to fry an egg on, but it kept working.
--
Michael McIntyre ---- Silvan < snipped-for-privacy@users.sourceforge.net>
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Silvan writes:

I think it's more or less the other way around. Those old CPUs didn't generate enough heat to create the kind of problems you get out of new machines. My old 166 and a later AMD around 300 ran without fans half the time. I wouldn't wonder if my old 25SX didn't freeze in winter. The first time I assembled a 1 gig machine, I put a power test on without a CPU fan and the CPU burned out in about 3 seconds, all from its own heat.
I'd hate to think what the inside of this 3 gig is like on a summer day!
Charlie Self "Brevity is the soul of lingerie." Dorothy Parker http://hometown.aol.com/charliediy/myhomepage/business.html
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On Thu, 08 Jan 2004 01:01:37 +0000, Charlie Self wrote:

Must not have been an Intel. A former Intel employee expalined to me that my Cyrix chip fried itself but I wouldn't have had that problem as Intel chips shut down on overheat detection in the chip. Have no idea if he was BS'ing me or not.
-Doug
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Doug Winterburn said:

He was accurate.
Greg G.
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On Wed, 07 Jan 2004 20:34:46 -0500, wrote:

...and AMD?
-Doug
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Up until recently, the AMDs did NOT shutdown when they overheated, they just died a fiery death. Especially if you didn't have a heatsink/fan attached, they would self destruct in something like 7 seconds. Lots of folks killed bunch of AMD CPUs by turning on the power "just to be suire the machine boots" before putting on the heatsink/fan
John
On Thu, 08 Jan 2004 01:54:40 GMT, Doug Winterburn

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Doug Winterburn responds:

He was. Mine was an Intel, straight from Intel's PR department for an article I was doing. It was an early one, and the replacement chip is still down in my kitchen running my wife's machine, but it has been downrated to 800 mHz to reduce its tendency to have fits.
Charlie Self "Brevity is the soul of lingerie." Dorothy Parker http://hometown.aol.com/charliediy/myhomepage/business.html
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Older chips (AMD and Pentium) had no thermal protection. Intel was the first to add thermal protection, and it took a while before AMD added it (and they caught hell for it, even though chances of a heatsink falling off the CPU are slim to none). When AMD finally added thermal protection, it took the motherboard manufacturers a while to implement it (AMD doesn't have the clout to strong-arm the mobo makers like Intel does). All modern CPUs (within the last year) have thermal protection IF your motherboard supports it.
Now, AMD has surpassed Intel regarding CPU management. If the motherboard manufacturers will support it, your AMD CPU can automatically run anywhere from, say, 800Mhz to 2200Mhz depending on your needs - this keeps the whole system much cooler and quieter, since most people don't need more than 800Mhz over 90% of the time. This is pretty new technology though, only 1 or 2 mobo makers support it so far....
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I just got a P4 3.2 HT system. The heatsink on the CPU is unbelievable. First you have the huge airflow shround with 2 80 mm case fans pulling heat out from the CPU. Under that are a set of metal fins - nothing unusual about that, except the density of the fins and the overall size. They are probably 5x the area of the actual chip die. The most interesting thing is there are some really think heat channeling wires that run across the diagonals of the heatsink. They seem to come directly from the processor itself, but I didn't screw with it and take the heatsink off to find out.
The case itself has 2 more 80 mm fans pulling air from the 450 W power supply. There are 2 80 mm fans blowing air in from the front of the case. This system has two 7200 rpm 250 Gb hard drives, as well as 2 optical drives, and a very fast video card, so heat is obviously an issue.
The neat thing is that the fans respond to the environmental conditions - they speed up when it is too hot and slow down when it isn't.
Mike
or other such that keep it running at 100% capacity around the

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