A new tool!

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I delivered my headboard job yesterday morning and I begin my entertainment center job for the next customer. It is made up of 4 more of my front and back face frame style cabinets. IIRC this will make 33 cabinets built this way in the last 32 months. As we all know cabinets typically have lots and lots of shelves and that many times over for the shelf pin holes. One job alone had in excess of 650 shelf pin holes. So I am sick and tired of the monotony of drilling those damn holes.
Many years ago I bought a jig for drilling these holes long before Rockler called itself Rockler,,,,, from Rockler. This jig was a clear plastic plate with spaced indexing holes for a Vix style drill bit. This thing worked great for many many years. With age the plastic began to crack and I was fearful that it would disintegrate in the middle of a job. Additionally with it's spring loaded bit each plunge to drill a hole required a bit more effort than simply drilling the hole. I wanted to go to a jig that simply used a standard non spring loaded bit.
My next jig was the Kreg shelf pin hole jig. I have drilled countless holes with this tool too but it really is not built for production. The jig allows you to drill about 6 holes and then you have re-index and drill 5 more, repeat, repeat, repeat..... I spent as much time repositioning the jig as drilling the holes. I did however like the standard non spring loaded drill bit. FWIW you can gang the Kreg jigs together for a longer run of holes however that arrangement is not ready for prime time. The attachment pieces that join the jigs cause the jigs to not sit flat on the panel so you absolutely have to clamp the jig flat to the surface for proper spacing perpendicular to the surface, adding more time.
A couple of days ago I contacted Precision Casewerk to get some particulars on their True Position Drill Guide. I might add here that the line boring feature for the shelf pins was not why I was looking at this jig. With cabinets come a ton of drawers and doors. I let my customer pick their pulls and these things come in a wide variety of sizes. There are simple jigs for drilling these attachment holes but again I am tired of making them and making them work. My last kitchen cabinet job with, customer supplied, pulls almost turned into a disaster. I quickly measured the pulls as 4" and they were actually 96mm. I used the 4" holes on my cheapo jig and the holes were wrong....;~) Fortunately the handles had large enough bases to allow me to enlarge the holes enough to work. I decided at that moment I was going to get a better jig.
The True Position Drill guide is pretty much infinitely adjustable for most any sized two screw pull. The jig allows you to repeatedly index these holes with great accuracy. You can actually attach the pulls to the jig and then lock the drill guides to the location you want, remove the pull and begin drilling. Any way this jig uses standard 5mm drill bits. And yes the shelf pin holes will be the increasingly common 5mm variety too. Talking directly with the manufacturer I was assured 5mm shelf pins would be plenty strong unless you were to set an anvil on the pin. They are basically 3/64" smaller than 1/4". The bonus feature to the jig is that you can attach two line boring plates and drill 24 holes 32mm apart with out having to move the jig, that is about 30".
Any way in true Leon fashion the jig is priced similar to Festool. The main jig generally sells for $169 and up. Adding the line boring plates normally adds about $110 to that figure so I was looking at $270 plus shipping. A big chunk of change, but hopefully it will be worth it's cost in time savings and certainly in lowering the frustration level.
Fortunately I thought to check my local cabinet hardware store, Cornerstone Hardware in Houston. Their price for the above mentioned jig and add on line boring plates was $239. I ended up with the TP-1935 kit.
http://www.precisioncasewerk.com/products.html
I'll post a review as I proceed with this job.
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On Sat, 30 Aug 2014 17:06:52 -0500, Leon wrote:

I just did 784 holes for some bookcases using the Kreg. Agreed, the repositioning is a pain, but I was happy that none of the 28 shelves rocked at all. Maybe disbelief is a better word than happy :-).
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On 8/30/2014 6:43 PM, Larry Blanchard wrote:

LOL. And even with perfect hole placement, you have to also factor in the possibility of the shelf not being perfectly flat and or the shelf pins not being perfectly square. I can't tell you how many times replacing a shelf pin solved a rocking shelf. ;~)
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On Sat, 30 Aug 2014 17:06:52 -0500, Leon wrote:

Yes, but the hole you put the pin in man not be as strong. With the common 1/4" "cylinder with a flat on it" shelf pin, I've had a few pins tear out the plywood when I used the shelf to help me up from a kneeling position. Can't think I put more than a third of my weight on them.
Now I use the L-shaped ones. They spread the weight better and I haven't had a problem yet. See:
<http://www.woodcraft.com/product/2001080/10110/hafele-shelf-supports- bracket-style-brass-14-25-pack.aspx> Note that I'm a hobbyist, not a professional, so my record of use is relatively small. Someone who uses them every day in their job might have more info.
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On 8/30/2014 6:51 PM, Larry Blanchard wrote:

Yes those are the only type of shelf pins I use, they basically lock in place and can't fall out. I buy them in 100 packs.
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I considered buying Woodpecker's hole jig, but it's not nearly in the class of the Precision Casewerk hole tool.
http://www.woodpeck.com/shelfpintemplate.html
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On 8/31/2014 12:58 AM, snipped-for-privacy@none.com wrote:

I made my own, similar, out of tempered masonite. I use a plunge router.
Max
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I use the same shelf pins with one particular difference. They have the capability of really being locked in place with the addition of a screw.
http://www.outdoorcraftsmansupply.com/lshapeshelfsupports14nickel.aspx
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If you are still looking, the Rockler JIG IT® Shelving Jig w/Self-Centering Bit works really well. I just wanted something that would do more. As I mentioned I was originally looking for a jig for drilling holes accurately and quickly for drawer and door pulls. The line boring accessory was a nice plus...
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"Leon" wrote in message

If you are still looking, the Rockler JIG IT® Shelving Jig w/Self-Centering Bit works really well. I just wanted something that would do more. As I mentioned I was originally looking for a jig for drilling holes accurately and quickly for drawer and door pulls. The line boring accessory was a nice plus...
I had a project a few years ago that required almost 1000 shelf pins. I started using the Rockler Jig and self centering bit. After an hour of drilling holes with the self centering bit I switched to a plunge router. The 3/8" base plate bushing for a PC 690 fits perfectly into the jig holes. I ground the end of the bushing down so that it did not bottom out in the jig, installed a 1/4" bit and finished the job in a quarter of the time it would have taken me with the drill bit..
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On 8/31/14, 7:53 AM, Leon wrote:

For those warped shelves.... http://www.spiralsupports.com
I use these exclusively, now.
--

-MIKE-

"Playing is not something I do at night, it's my function in life"
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On 8/31/2014 11:23 AM, -MIKE- wrote:

Those look cool but I have had issues with 1/4" plastic supports in the past, I would imagine that might be more of a problem with the 5mm pins. I find that if I just bend the "L" shaped supports mentioned above you can cure a warped shelf problem.
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wrote:

Took three or four tries here.
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On 8/31/14, 12:13 PM, Leon wrote:

That's a great technique. I'll keep that in mind for people who don't like plastic.
--

-MIKE-

"Playing is not something I do at night, it's my function in life"
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Sure you can make your own, but I found a long time ago that it can be a great detriment to being able to make something for yourself. The time you can waste doing that can be immense. And, all it takes is one little screw up while making some jig to add to the time wasted.
You have to pick your battles (building stuff for yourself) very carefully.
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On 8/31/2014 5:47 PM, snipped-for-privacy@teksavvy.com wrote:

I would think that building the jig accurately would not be as much of a problem as lifting a router with each hole and pushing down against the spring in the router hundreds of times. Then there is the matter of adding holes to an already built cabinet.
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On 8/31/2014 4:47 PM, snipped-for-privacy@teksavvy.com wrote:

Although I do a project for profit from time to time my woodworking is mostly a hobby so I very seldom consider the construction of a jig as a waste of time. If I ran a business I would consider the purchase of a time saving device a wise investment.
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On 9/1/2014 7:03 PM, MaxD wrote:

much sense for others.
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I wasn't suggesting that building a jig was a waste of time, just that in some cases, for me anyway, building some jigs doesn't give me any enjoyment. If you're getting enjoyment from the project you're buiding *and* any jigs you build for that project then I'm all for that.
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I find that extremely hard to believe. I have seen most all woodworking shows use a plunge router for this purpose but they seldom continue to do so. I would think that lifting a tool that is twice as heavy would be slower. I really don't see any advantage that would make the router faster. Can you explain where the time savings comes in?
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