A Little OT : How to install Crown where the wall and ceiling meet at a 45??


Ok - Im finally getting around to finish my bonus room. Did all the window caseings and the base molding. I want to put crown between the wall and the ceiling. The problem Im having is that the wall meets the ceiling at 45 degrees.
There are 6 foot knee walls that then go up to hit the ceiling.
Think of what home plate looks like (but with the top cut off) thats what the room looks like.
Im thinking of just ripping a peice of 2x4 at a 45 - install it on the ceiling to give the crown a flat piece where I can mount it.
Im open to suggestions.....
Thanks -Rob
You can reply to me at r_b_v at v_e_r_z_e_r_a doht c_o_m (remove the _ to get the address)
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Wow. I can't see any way that you can do this. Crown moulding is designed to fit between perpendicular surfaces (90 degrees). You might be able to custom fabricate a special moulding yourself, if you have milling equipment. In the remote chance you get something that works, lot's of luck cutting miters. A math whiz might be able to figure out the bevel/ angle combinations.......
Steve
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Thats what I figured.
Im thinking about adding a 45 degree peice on the wall to make a 90' angle w/ the ceiling - not sure how that will look though.

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The Rob V entity posted thusly:

Normal crown uses two angles that add up to 45 degrees. I'd be tempted to try one of two things:
1. Use regular crown, and re-cut the 45 degree angles to 22.5 degrees using a router or saw.
2. Cut your own crown, making the angles 22.5 degrees instead of 45.
I am just a rank novice, and my idea may not even be workable.
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wrote:

33 degrees tilt and 35 degrees angle on my compound miter did it.
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Do a google group search of this group and you will find the subject discussed here a few times. Here's a site, that will probably be mentioned, that shows some examples. You might notice that the examples are painted and some angles (like where the top of the crown meets the sloped ceiling) are not exactly close-ups. http://www.compoundmiter.com/cathedral_ceiling.html
It can be done (several of us here have done it) although I've never been totally satisfied with the compromises that have to be made when running crown on a ceiling with much of a rake.
Mike O.
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That's what I did in my hall, with the crown about 6" from the ceiling. (ripped board on the wall open at the top) Then I dropped rope light in there on an occupancy sensor. Gives a great soft light for the hall when you are walking around at night. It's part of my "never be in the dark" system. The lights folow you around the house.
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I did this once...but it wasn't easy. (Of course you really mean 135 degrees between the wall and ceiling (90 + 45)).To make the moulding I measured the wall/ceiling angle very carefully (mine was 127) and then I set my table saw to rip the edge of a stock piece of crown moulding to get modify it and get the correct angle. Everything went pretty good until started the installation and I tried to miter cut a corner. Then I wasted a bunch of moulding trying to get the cut right (never did). I ended up doing a cope cut to make it work (still took several tries). I wish you luck. The next time that I run into this I'm going to tape the joint and cover it with dry wall compound.
--
Charley


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