a grab bag of questions

Hello ng,
I just put the gate together that I brought up a couple weeks ago. The fortran calculations I made were right on the nuts:
$ gfortran -Wall -Wextra judy3.f90 -o out.exe $ ./out.exe rough opening is 36.000000 encasing is 2.5000000 finished opening is 33.500000 left_gap is 0.50000000 right_gap is 0.50000000 spar is 32.500000 middle is 31.000000 gap is 3.5000000 calc is 4.8750000 height2 is 60.500000 height3 is 53.500000 $ cat judy3.f90 implicit none
integer, parameter :: sp = selected_real_kind(3,7)
real (kind=sp):: rough_opening, encasing, fin_opening real (kind=sp):: left_gap, right_gap, spar real (kind=sp):: top_hinge, bottom_hinge, middle real (kind=sp):: picket_width, gap real (kind=sp):: middle2, bot_reveal, height, calc, top_reveal real (kind=sp):: height2, height3 real (kind=sp) :: check, gap2 integer :: number
! values number = 4 rough_opening = 36 encasing = 2.5 left_gap = .5 right_gap = .5 top_hinge = 52 bottom_hinge = 10 picket_width = 5.5 top_reveal = 6.75 middle2 = 48.875 bot_reveal = 1.5 height = 62 height3 = 53.5
number = 4
! calculations fin_opening = rough_opening - encasing spar = fin_opening - left_gap - right_gap middle = (top_hinge + bottom_hinge) / 2.0_sp gap = (spar - (number*picket_width))/(number-1) gap2 = (spar - (picket_width*(number-1))-(gap*(number-2)))/2.0 check = (number-2)*gap + (number-1)*picket_width + 2.0 * gap2 calc = height - top_reveal - bot_reveal - middle2 height2 = top_reveal + middle2 + calc
! output print *, "rough opening is ", rough_opening print *, "encasing is ", encasing print *, "finished opening is ", fin_opening print *, "left_gap is ", left_gap print *, "right_gap is ", right_gap print *, "spar is ", spar print *, "middle is ", middle print *, "gap is ", gap print *, "calc is ", calc print *, "height2 is ", height2 print *, "height3 is ", height3 endprogram
! gfortran -Wall -Wextra judy3.f90 -o out.exe $
I've got a variety of questions, so I'll just begin shotgun style:
q1) I called the horizontal framing members "spars" like the framing elements that jut out normally from a mast. Is there a better word for that?
q2) The lumber I bought was cedar. It was wet and it *punished* me by bowing crazy. How should I have treated these materials so that I didn't get stung like that?
Is it the idea with cedar that they do less kilning and that's wehy it's so frickin cheap?
q3) The bottom hinge squeaks for about 20 degrees of rotation. Why, and what do I do about it?
Thanks for your comment, and cheers,
--
Uno

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In a panel door, the horizontals are 'rails' and the verticals are 'stiles'.

If you want something done right... you have to dry the cedar yourself. The extra expense of storing and drying fence boards that will face the weather is not usually borne by the board supplier. Framing lumber usually IS fully dry as bought.

Metal fastened to wood is infamous for squeaking; there's probably a hinge plate that twists as the door opens, and you're hearing the metal/wood interface rubbing. Something wasn't accurately aligned, and perhaps the hinges aren't on the same exact vertical axis?
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whit3rd wrote:

Ok.
Ok.
I took great pains to believe that everything was normal, but I've got a squeak. My method was as follows.
The cinder block to which I attached was plumb. The wood encasing that I attached to the cinder block was plumb, with respect to a plane 90 dg transformed.
I prefabed the gate door on a planar surface, with the rails drawn correctly below the wonky cedar.
I fought with the cedar for 2 weeks as I sealed it and needed to toss lumber that did not want to plane.
As the rails were *close* to parallel, I attached the hinges to the rails at their midsection.
The hinges that connect the rails to the encasing were lined up with the edge of the encasing that is plumb in 2 directions.
So, tja, any ideas?
--
Uno

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It sounds like the hinge pins are both vertical, but they also have to be collinear (same line) as well as parallel. After careful examination, you can remove a hinge and trim or shim under it to get a minor adjustment. The old trick is to heat the hinge red hot and clamp it in place, so it chars a socket for itself; the gate will bend before that hinge squeaks. Pintle-type hinges are self-adjusting, are commonly used for gates.
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On 6/8/2010 12:12 PM, whit3rd wrote:

Thanks for your comment. It went away before I could address it. I knew the install was good.
Wouldn't know what a pintle were.
Cheers,
--
Uno

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It's a gate. If it looks good from 10' away and all the hardware works and attaches itself with a mild swing in without wrestling it, you're good to go. Oil the hinge and walk away.
RP
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On 6/8/2010 3:20 PM, RP wrote:

Right.
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