A good (and long) article about rust

I have seen a lot of this, but not in one place and not so well-written?
http://www.metalwebnews.com/howto/rust/rust.html
woodstuff
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From the link: "You can discourage rust a number of ways. For my woodworking tools, like my table saw and jointer tops, I use Automobile Paste Wax. I put it on fairly heavily and often. It seems to work well. There are also cream waxes, but these contain some water, so I stick with paste. "
Automobile paste wax frequently - Real Frequently - contains silicones. Silicones are not conducive to decent finishes on wood. As wood passes over a waxed surface containing silicones it picks up some of those silicones and renders it difficult to finish.
Use Boeshield or Johnson red stripe paste wax.
This was a jump off the page issue. After seeing this, I did not bother reading the rest of it.
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wrote:

Many "automotive polishes" do. Automotive "paste wax" is much like Johnson paste wax - usually high in Carnaubu, along with mixtures of paraffin , beaswax, and what have you - but NOT silicone.None of Turtles "paste waxes" including super hard shell, super hard shell carnaubu,extreme paste wax or liquid paste wax contain silicones. Nor does the original formula Simoniz, which is still available.
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snipped-for-privacy@snyder.on.ca wrote: ...

How do you know that...I can't find any info that says one way or another what the wax product ingredients are. Their FAQ on silicones/polymers simply says silicones are polishing agent additives but doesn't say there's not some included in any of the waxes.
I certainly had been led to believe the lore; would be pleased to know certain whether is/isn't...
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On 7/5/2010 9:30 PM, snipped-for-privacy@snyder.on.ca wrote:

You've personally analyzed every such product on the market? You have a source that has done so?

Per <http://www.turtlewax.com/res/msds/T411R.pdf , Turtle Wax PLATINUM SERIES ULTRA GLOSS PASTE WAX contains 7-10 percent Volatile Silicone D-5. Oops.

From where?
Sorry, but Johnson and Butcher's have a track record, car waxes do not. If you can provide a list of car waxes that are silicone-free and can back that list up with test results you'll be doing a useful service, but your blanket statement is just plain wrong.
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Beware of Mr. Rust Some people have a reputation for rusting everything that they hold. These people have unique body oil. I don't know if it contains metal salts, high moisture content, or low pH. If you have guests in your shop, be careful about letting them handle good steel or tools. You might be the first to discover that Uncle Bert is one of those guys with a corrosive touch.
If you have this unique body oil, consider wearing cotton gloves oiled with something like Breakfree CLP to keep your body oils off of tools. Breakfree CLP is a multipurpose teflon oil designed to clean, lubricate, and protect metal. Another approach is to wash your hands and give them a light rub with mineral oil before handling metal.
Really??? I have never heard of that one.
Tim w
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Mate of mine (a smoker) does this. Another friend's lathe has fingerprints etched into the chrome on the handwheels from him.
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On 7/5/2010 5:58 AM, Andy Dingley wrote:

Don't we exude some amount of salt when we sweat? Perhaps some of us more than others? Seems to me that could be a factor in this equation...
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Our body oils are of acidic pH balance and they can etch certain finishes.
wrote:

--
See Nad. See Nad go. Go Nad!
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ago, and when I returned to the shop the next day, the owner showed me his hand prints. Also, in my own shop, I move my stuff around alot (I started putting casters on my machines 20-something years ago), and I sometime grab the top to pull or push it. It is clear that I cause rust in those areas.. Maybe I am Mr. Rust!! LOL
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On 7/5/2010 3:47 AM, Tim W wrote:

It's why I cringe whenever someone "sits in" with the band on a song and asks to use my bass ... some people will rust steel instrument strings between songs. :(
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Dear goodness no! The chemistry is rubbish, the workshop advice worse.
Besides which, where do you buy affordable lanolin these days? I've been trying to buy a litre or two for the last couple of years. You can't even buy it on Bradford any more.
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"Andy Dingley" wrote:

A dairy supply house.
On this side of the pond, they sell it under the "Udder Balm" label.
It will also be lower cost than you expect.
Prevents galling on S/S sailboat rigging.
No self respecting sailor leaves port without it.<G>
Lew
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I've not seen "Udder Balm", but our local equivalents in the farm shops have too much in the way of additives.
At present, the closest to pure lanolin I've found is for treating horse tack. This is creamed and has solvents added, but as I wanted to make leather dressings from it anyway, they seem to be compatible with the rest of my recipe. Trouble is that the price of anything horse- related gets steep.
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Andy Dingley wrote:

May not be available readily over there; the old timey favorite used as a kid for its intended purpose amongst others was "The Original" Bag Balm (since 1899)...
Lwww.bagbalm.com>
--
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On Mon, 5 Jul 2010 04:00:46 -0700 (PDT), Andy Dingley

eBay, Andy. Hmm, interesting. It's not for sale in the UK. You might be able to talk a seller into shipping it to you, though. http://fwd4.me/Vk0 http://fwd4.me/Vk3 http://www.soapgoods.com/Lanolin-Wax-p-683.html
-- It's also helpful to realize that this very body that we have, that's sitting right here right now, with its aches and its pleasures, is exactly what we need to be fully human, fully awake, fully alive. -- Pema Chodron
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"Good article"? "well-written"?
Hardly.
The writer understands *nothing* about the chemistry of rusting, as shown by this statement in the second paragraph: "When iron combines with oxygen, it forms iron oxide, or rust. "
That's just not true.
Rust and iron oxide are *not* the same. Rust is *hydrated* iron oxide; that is, iron oxide that has combined with water. Steel and iron oxidize readily, but *cannot* rust unless they get wet.
Another false statement: "Rust is really Fe2O3, a reddish form of iron oxide." No, it's not. Rust is hydrated iron oxide, Fe2O3 * nH2O.
And the advice to use automotive paste wax on woodworking tools is waaaaay off base. Most automotive wax products contain silicone, which interferes greatly with many wood finishes. (Google "silicone fisheye" for more information.) Depending on your ambient humidity, *non*-automotive paste wax such as Johnson's, Minwax, or Butchers may be adequate to protect your woodworking tools from rust. It works for me in Indianapolis, with my shop in the basement and protected by dehumidifiers. It doesn't work for Leon in Houston.
IMHO, this article is best ignored. The author is demonstrably ignorant of the cause and mechanism of the formation of rust, and gives clearly bad advice about the use of products to prevent its formation.
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wrote:

Hey Doug, I agree with your post. I remember some of my organic chemistry from decades ago, but not much. I know what ferrous oxide is, but I never was good at keeping it away.
I use a scotchbrite pad under a random orbital sander, and then coat with Johnson's paste wax. I had been looking for a good and more permanent coating for my tops when I came across this article.
I have a hard-headed friend who has used Turtle Wax for decades and he won't be swayed. We both run larger volumes of stock through our machines that whatever is put on there doesn't stay long. Most stuff ends up going through a sanding process and any wax residue goes into the dust collector. I do agree with you 100% about the problems of silicone.
I didn't answer all of your post, but time is limited.
Have a good day, woodstuff
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