A funny student story about glue

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Lee Gordon wrote:

Dave in Fairfax
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Good stuff, there. For my wife, the absolute horror when it comes to things I'd *kill* to eat is sushi- especially the raw flying fish roe, and spider rolls made with an entire crab. She just doesn't know good food when it's looking right at her... The look on her face when I take a bite of the end of a spider roll is just priceless (for those of you who don't get into sushi, the ends of that particular roll have the crab legs, complete with tiny pinchers, sticking out of them. Not the most appealing thing to stare at, but ohhhhhh are they good.)
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I used to work for a software company that had its main office here in Indianapolis, and a couple other offices in other parts of the US. A couple of us from the Indy office were at a computer conference in California with a guy from our Los Angeles office. He was telling us all about different kinds of sushi, how good they taste, and so on. Told him "back in Indiana, we call that stuff by a different name.... BAIT!"
-- Regards, Doug Miller (alphageek at milmac dot com)
Nobody ever left footprints in the sands of time by sitting on his butt. And who wants to leave buttprints in the sands of time?
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On Mon, 02 May 2005 01:45:20 GMT, snipped-for-privacy@milmac.com (Doug Miller) wrote:

Yeah, that's what they call it in Wisconsin, too. But one of the local Chinese joints got converted to a Sushi bar by one of the sons who inherited the place, so now I get to have it again, despite the seemingly universal loathing midwesterners have for the very idea of it. I can't be the only one, the place takes reservations and is always packed.
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On Mon, 02 May 2005 05:58:01 -0500, Prometheus wrote:

I like sushi, but I don't like the idea of eating raw seafood in Wisconsin--It has to travel for too long. Whitefish sushi? A local market has cello-wrapped sushi to go. No way.
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vladimir a t mad scientist com
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Fresh sucker sushi - mmmmmmm.....
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On Tue, 03 May 2005 10:15:50 -0500, Australopithecus scobis

I don't know what the shipping arrangements are, but they have most of the shellfish in live tanks right at the bar. Most of the other stuff is cooked. There are only a couple of raw things as far as I can tell, mainly roe and tuna.
The wrapped sushi is always imitation crabmeat around here. It'll do in a pinch, but it's not very good ice-cold and they don't make the rice correctly (I suspect they're using minute rice or something equally unsuitable.) At any rate, I give them points for trying- and it's a fine way to introduce it to an area where some people consider ketchup to be "too spicy" :)
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<snip>

As a coastal dweller for most of my life, I have learned, through sad experience, that some foods don't travel all that well. I never order seafood more than an hour or so from the coast.
On the other hand, ordering the local specialties has usually been pretty satisfactory. Most cultures adapt pretty well to their surroundings. I will admit that I have never traveled to Asia. However, we have a large and diverse Asian community here in the Bay Area, and their restaraunts are generally pretty saavy about what they serve to a large man of Scandinavian origins. (Usually, the squid is cooked.)
Patriarch
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I'd agree with you years ago but things have changed. I've seen lobsters in tanks in Maine being held for a couple of weeks before shipping them both down the street and across country. The big guy can store a million pounds. I've also seen fish process right off the boat in New Bedford and in Las Vegas restaurants the next day.
(we make truckloads of insulating shipping containers for the seafood industry every day)
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wrote in message

Aye. Recent object lesson:
My missus has always said she didn't like salmon. She'll eat virtually any other kinda fish, but not the pink-fleshed beauty. I just figured it was because she was born & raised in Nebraska, and her fish-eating experience growing up was pretty limited.
Well, a while back I bought some portioned frozen salmon steaks, and finally needled her into trying one; I had had one myself beforehand and they were outstanding. She was equally impressed, both w/ the fish and how much she liked it.
Come to find out that her aversion was due to salmon loaf she was fed as a kid - canned salmon. Bleah. I won't touch the stuff unless it's fried up as salmon cakes, or put in chowder or something. I said, "It never occurred to you that fresh-frozen salmon steak might taste just a *wee* bit different than canned? Sheesh."
Jason
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"Jason Quick" wrote in message

I am about the same way with salmon. Keep trying to cook it myself and it comes out dry as a bone. Thought I was overcooking, try again various different ways, same story.
Then had some "grilled salmon" at a gig the other night and damned it wasn't the best fish I've ever eaten, moist and tasty as hell.
Just how did they do that?
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Swingman wrote:

If you want to discuss this off-line, give me a yell. Baking salmon is dicey and frequently comes out dry, so you probably aren't to blame for that. If you have a grill or are willing to use the broiler, 10 min per inch is MORE than enough. I'd be tempted to go way less than that, much like tuna. Foil wrapping and butter inside with lemon also help.
Dave in Fairfax
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Cook salmon on a board: Buy a cedar fence board. (Non-treated would be a good idea) ;-) Plane or sand one side (Possible new tool) Cut to length to fit on your BBQ (Possible other new tool) ;-) Soak board in water for about an hour Spray board with PAM or rub with oil Lay salmon or other fish on board, brush with butter and sprinkle with Old Bay seasoning. Cook covered on BBQ Yummy
Bob Meyer
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Bob Meyer wrote:

I'd replace the Old Bay with lemon zest and fresh cracked black pepper, but otherwise it sounds good.
Dave in Fairfax
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Makes me think of the old recipe for "planked carp". Follow directions to "Yummy", but at that point throw the fish away & eat the board.
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Nahmie
The greatest headaches are those we cause ourselves.
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I used to work with a "good-ole-boy" type, real outdoorsman. I asked him once if carp were really any good to eat. He said, yep, if you fix 'em right. OK, Russ, how do you fix carp? He said, cut the heads off and toss 'em in the garden. Grows the best damn tomatoes you ever ate!
-- Regards, Doug Miller (alphageek at milmac dot com)
Nobody ever left footprints in the sands of time by sitting on his butt. And who wants to leave buttprints in the sands of time?
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wrote:

Please notice I am NOT starting this message with "Once upon a time" or "You ain't gonna believe this sh*t".
Early 60's, pre-SWMBO, her father was out of work, they lived right on Chautauqua(Sh-uh-taw-qua) Lake. During carp spawn, they come up & roll in weed beds. Her brother would go out in a john-boat with a bowfishing rig, 100lb. line. I helped him a few times, rowing & helping pull 5' plus carp up off the bottom, where they headed when he hit them. We'd take off a row of scales along the spine, skin them, then her dad would filet them, making sure to get mud streak out. He's marinate them in salt brine overnight, then put them in a smoker he made from a junkyard refrigerator. Hot smoke at first to bake the fat out, then Apple & corncob to slow smoke. Weigh it up on a scale, he was selling the stuff for $1.00/lb in bars to fishermen who wouldn't eat carp on a bet!(He wouldn't tell them what it was, just take out a nice chunk and pass it around for samples, then tell what it was after they started buying). Helped keep their family going that summer.
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"Norman D. Crow" wrote in message

When I was in college in the early 60's a German family who owned a small restaurant in a little town about 30 miles from the college town made, believe it or not, sausage from carp.
I remember once helping the old man unload (they had a good-looking daughter who accounted from my presence) a pickup, full to the top of the truck bed, with buffalo carp ... and there were only four carp. The sausage was spicy and good, the carp were caught in gill nets (illegal) on the Brazos river, and today the family has a thriving, and ostensibly, pork, beef and venison sausage business that is well known over this part of the country and even sold in Sam's.
I often wonder if there is any gill netted (legal or not) carp in it ... but the sausage is so good I would neither care, nor tell.
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And your thinking was? That once you smelled of man-sweat, river mud and dead fish you'd be so attractive she couldn't help herself? How'd that work out for ya?
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Owen Lowe
The Fly-by-Night Copper Company
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"Fly-by-Night CC"wrote in

LOL Never thought of it that way ... if the old man had known what we were up to he would have oiled up the shotgun ... so maybe it was a guilt trip?
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