A funny student story about glue

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Edwin Pawlowski wrote:

It's my understanding that sheep's eyes are a delicacy in the Middle East. I'm sure that there is a lesson there somewhere, but dang if I know what.
--
--John
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Edwin Pawlowski wrote:

rim
Some

Hi Ed, I do know that and understand. I personally just can't imagine it. To kind of twist what you're talking about...people here don't always know what they're eating.... Factory farm raised meat, bologna, pepperoni, chicken nuggets, etc....I'm very fortunate to have enough connections to buy all farm raised meat that's organic and raised on pasture. I get fish (since my parents sold out years ago) from my brother that comes out of Northern MN, and vegetables from the Amish since our pet pig gets our garden once it's ready every year.
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Back in college, I used to work with another college kid, a girl who came from Vietnam with her parents in about '73. She would always bring her lunch from home instead of going out to Pizza Hut or whatever with the rest of us. One day... (me) <sniff, sniff> Hey, Tran, that smells pretty good, what is it? (she) <something-or-other Vietnamese name>, want to try some? (me) Sure. <munch, munch> Hmm.. pretty good. What is that? (she) Oh, that is the stomach of the pig!
If she had told me what it was first - in English - I never would have eaten it. But it was good.
-- Regards, Doug Miller (alphageek at milmac dot com)
Nobody ever left footprints in the sands of time by sitting on his butt. And who wants to leave buttprints in the sands of time?
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On Sun, 01 May 2005 01:23:03 GMT, snipped-for-privacy@milmac.com (Doug Miller) wrote:

I know what you mean. I used to frequent a little Vietnamese restaurant in Seattle many years back. I have no idea what I ate there, but it was cheap and good, which was all I cared about.
-- "We need to make a sacrifice to the gods, find me a young virgin... oh, and bring something to kill"
Tim Douglass
http://www.DouglassClan.com
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(Doug Miller)

You guys are making me hungry: http://www.funnypart.com/funny_flash/peking_moon.shtml
--
"New Wave" Dave In Houston



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wrote:

Wierd Al; I love that one. Actually, I like most of his parodies better than the original artist's songs.
+--------------------------------------------------------------------------------+ If you're gonna be dumb, you better be tough +--------------------------------------------------------------------------------+
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snipped-for-privacy@milmac.com (Doug Miller) wrote:

When I lived in central Pennsylvania decades ago my ex's farm family would make "hogmaw" sort of a corned beef hash looking conglomeration cooked in a pig stomach - always reminded me of a giant lima bean and quite tasty. They also ate "souse," "scrapple," "head cheese," and "blood sausage" - very little of the animal was discarded.
Check out the background pic: <http://www.trygve.com/headcheese.html
--
Owen Lowe
The Fly-by-Night Copper Company
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<snippage>

Yum, yum! Then there's the "cracklin's", the leftover fat tissue after it's been cooked and the lard pressed out. Grandma always keep a big dishpan of it right next to the back door for us to snack out of when she was making lard.
Then of course there's "tripe", which is cow stomach, and can occasionally be found in the markets here. Not to mention beef heart & tongue. Let us not forget "Haggis", which I've never had, but I believe is stuff cooked in a sheep's stomach(UK brethren correct me here, please).
--
Name
The greatest headaches are those we cause ourselves.
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wrote:

The stomach is the cooking vessel. I don't think you actually eat the stomach.
The actual "ingredients" are mutton trimmings, oats, and potatoes, which, while not exactly haute cuisine, aren't terribly different from sausage.
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: The stomach is the cooking vessel. I don't think you actually eat the : stomach.
: The actual "ingredients" are mutton trimmings, oats, and potatoes, : which, while not exactly haute cuisine, aren't terribly different from : sausage.
Real haggis includes ground sheep heart, lungs, and liver.
Bleeeachhh!
    -- Andy Barss
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wrote:

C'mon now Andy, you never tried some of the more "imaginative" Indian or Tex/Mex cuisine? Someone mentioned earlier about very little going to waste . . most farmers who raise their own pork use "everything but the squeal". On the farm, after trimming everything off for "head cheese" Uncle would hang the skull from wire in the henhouse and let the chickens clean off what they wanted of it. Don't knock head cheese until you've tried it. Good home-made stuff is tasty. Not a thing in the world wrong with heart or liver either. Fresh pork liver was always on the menu for supper on hog-butchering day.
On butchering day, Granddad would bring a couple big washtubs, collect the entrails for some Italiano friends in town. They cleaned them out to use for natural sausage casing. Not my idea of *fun*, but the sausage was good.
Difficult to find it these days, but a nice beef heart and/or tongue is right up there on my list of tasty stuff. SWMBO hasn't done it for a long time, but makes a great dish of pickled heart and tongue. Usually hard to keep the lid on long enough for it to get pickled.
Doug Miller, you live in hog country, didja ever try scrambled eggs 'n' pork brains? MMMmmmmmmm!
Ah, the memories! People talk about eating venison, etc. Nothing wrong with woodchuck, young raccoon or squirrel, either.
--
Nahmie
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Nope, and have no intention of doing so, either.

Had squirrel for the first time a coupla years ago. That's good eating! But they sure are a PITA to skin.
-- Regards, Doug Miller (alphageek at milmac dot com)
Nobody ever left footprints in the sands of time by sitting on his butt. And who wants to leave buttprints in the sands of time?
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"Doug Miller" wrote in message

But
Not if you know "the trick" ... I bet I could still skin a squirrel in less than ten seconds, even though I haven't had any practice in 30 years. Starting at the age of nine, when I got my first .22, part of my job was to supply the household with squirrel meat.
--
www.e-woodshop.net
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wrote:

OK, give! What's "the trick"?
-- Regards, Doug Miller (alphageek at milmac dot com)
Nobody ever left footprints in the sands of time by sitting on his butt. And who wants to leave buttprints in the sands of time?
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"Doug Miller" wrote in message

Country boy method: Hold squirrel up by skin of back with one hand; with sharp knife, make one slice in skin down toward backbone; insert two fingers of each hand into incision in back skin and pull hands quickly apart; use to knife to cut off head and feet along with parted skin.
You can do it faster than it takes to read the above sentence.
.... skinning a squirrel this way is like taking off your girlfriends pantyhose. Caveat: rabbits can also be skinned this way, but rabbit skin will tear in patches instead of coming off in two pieces like it does with a squirrel, which makes for a mess.
--
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wrote:

Thanks, Swingman, I'll try that next time and see how it goes. Previously, I've tried to skin them the same way I would a rabbit, and it just hasn't worked too well.
-- Regards, Doug Miller (alphageek at milmac dot com)
Nobody ever left footprints in the sands of time by sitting on his butt. And who wants to leave buttprints in the sands of time?
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"Doug Miller" wrote in message

Be sure to pull with both hands at the same time, one toward the head, the other toward the tail.
One summer, as a youngster of 9 or 10, I imagined I was going to make enough money off of skins (coons, rabbits and squirrels) to buy myself a good shotgun. I spent the summer at my grandparents heavily wooded farm skinning the squirrels like you would a rabbit in an attempt to save the hides in one piece, only to find out that the pelt buyers wouldn't buy "summer" hides that year ... you're right, it is a PITA.
Gave that up and forever went back to the country boy, "meat" hunters squirrel skinning method mentioned.
--
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Or any other summer; winter is the time of year to collect fur.
--
"New Wave" Dave In Houston



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"D. J. MCBRIDE" wrote in message

Not always true. Local hide dealers had previously been buying year around to feed the 'coat collar' market/fashion craze after WWII ... in particular anything, like a squirrel hide, that could be doctored to resemble fox.
My nine year old aspirations caught the tail end of the fashion and, not for the first time, were dashed by market place reality.
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Especially when the rabbit is squirming so much eh?
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