A few newbie woodworking questions.

-> How are biscut joint slots cut? -> For joining two pieces of MDF at 90 degrees should biscut joints ordowel pins be used?
-> How are rabbet joints cut? (I assume a router table is required) Thanks.
--adam
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Can be done on a router talbe with a special bit, or wiht a plate joiner tool. (about $150)

I'd use biscuits.

There are rabbeting bits for routers. Table would be easier, IMO, but not a requirement.
Can be done an a table saw also, using a dado blade. . Ed
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With a Plate Joiner. Some get away with a slot cutter bit on a router although this dill not work every where that a Plate Joiner will.

I would go with Biscuits. Dowels are harder to align properly and the thickness of the material between the surface of the MDF and the hole for the dowel is thinner than if a slot is cut for a biscuit. The material would probably be weaker as a result.

With a router and rabbet bit or a table saw with a dado blade. You do not necessarily need a router table to cut the rabbit with a router. It would probably be easier holding the router.

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On 3 Jul 2004 22:07:15 -0700, snipped-for-privacy@gmail.com (Adam) calmly ranted:

Usually with a biscuit joiner. (Note the correct spelling.)

Biscuits.
With routers, table saws (dado head), chisels, rabbet planes, fillister planes, etc.
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Adam wrote:

With a biscuit joiner, sometimes sold as a "plate joiner".

Since you had ask about how the slots are cut, it's reasonable to assume that you don't have a biscuit joiner. If you're doing this once then go with the dowels (you might want to get a set of "dowel points", which help in aligning the holes), if you're going to be doing a lot of it or are looking for an excuse to buy a tool then spring for the biscuit joiner.

There are numerous options--router in table, hand-held router with rabbeting bit, table saw, radial arm saw, jointer, rabbet plane, even chisel if you're patient and careful.

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With a plate joiner - a handheld tool that cuts slots for biscuits. You can also buy a router bit to do the job.

Either one. Doweling jigs are generally cheaper to buy, or easy to make.

In terms of power tools, a table saw, a router, or a jointer will do the job.

You're welcome.
Brian.

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On 3 Jul 2004 22:07:15 -0700, snipped-for-privacy@gmail.com (Adam) wrote:

plunges into the wood. Fast and easy. The slot could be cut with a router, but this is more difficult.

Dowel pins are good, and biscuits are better for MDF. Barefaced housing joints work just as well as dowel pins for MDF, and easier to make.

A rabbet joint can be cut using a table saw, a router, or (sometimes) a jointer. I prefer the table saw with a dado blade, although a dado blade is not absolutely necessary.
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