9.6, 12 or 14.4

The batteries for my 9.6V DeWalt cordless screwdriver/drill have just about had it.
Should I buy two new batteries for the 9.6 with the free drill and charger for $100?
Or, step up to a 12 or 14.4V? I'm kind of leaning toward the 14.4 DeWalt, $200 is a lot though for a screwdriver/drill. They also seem a little heavy for drilling pilot holes and driving screws. It would of course have to make the occasional trip to MIL to hang curtains and what ever else.
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It is an easy decision. If you were happy with the 9.6v before, get another. It is always nice to have two drill; save changing bits. If you felt it was underpowered, and need something heavy and awkward, go for a more powerful drill.
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9.6 is plenty for pilot holes and driving #10 and smaller screws into pilot holes. New batteries will seem stronger also. It is not a bad idea to guy the whole kit if you are going to buy 2 or more new batteries.
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You can always go to 15.6. I bought a Panasonic because it has a nice feel to it and is smaller than some drills of less power. It did, however, cost twice what you are talking about.
My guess is that if the 9.6 worked for you it will continue to. I used a 3.6V for screws and while a little slower than my drill, it worked and only cost $25. Unless you have other need for more power, stick with the lighter drill.
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You guys are probably right. The 9.6 never left me looking for more. If I really need it I can pull out the electric or the hammer drill. That way I can save up for a drill press. I've recently had to use my plunge router to 'drill' straight holes.
face=Arial size=2>...</FONT></DIV><FONT face=Arial size=2>&gt; <BR>&gt; You can always go to 15.6.&nbsp; I bought a Panasonic because it has a nice feel <BR>&gt; to it and is smaller than some drills of less power.&nbsp; It = did, however, cost <BR>&gt; twice what you are talking about.<BR>&gt; <BR>&gt; My guess is that if the 9.6 worked for you it will continue to.&nbsp; I used a <BR>&gt; 3.6V for screws and while a little slower than my drill, it worked and only <BR>&gt; cost $25.&nbsp; Unless you have other need for more power, stick with the lighter <BR>&gt; drill. <BR>&gt; <BR>&gt;</FONT></BODY></HTML>
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Take a look at the Panasonic EY6105YQW 12-Volt Drill/Driver. I recently bought one of these from Amazon when they had it on sale for $49. The price has gone up to $90, but I think it's still a good buy. The drill has good power, but it's lightweight and easy to handle.
--
-- Steve

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calmly ranted:

There are several of those sets on Ebay for $25 or so (a penny for the drill kit plus $22 to ship and $3 mandatory insurance.)
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Hi Ray,
I was about to replace my 12 V. PC drill because one of the ni-cads was worthless and the other was showing signs of going. I considered replacing the batteries, but that would be almost as expensive as buying a new one. It is about 12 years old.
Then I got to thinking that the batteries might still have something left in them and that it might be worth trying to rejuvinate them.
I went on a 2 week charge/discharge cycle with both batteries. I would charge one, put it in the drill, then clamp the trigger on. When it ran down, I replaced it with the other battery and did the same. After a few weeks, I noticed a huge improvement in battery charge life - so much so, that I am satisfied to keep my old drill for now.
Just a thought.
Lou

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The place I buy batteries from has a Cadex charging/conditioning unit. Every nicad pack they sell is run through the process and the battery condition is printed on the battery pack. I can send batteries there for testing and conditioning before replacement. The articles I have read from Cadex suggest that construction batteries are usually in better shape because they are run until they are dead (1volt per cell which is no power to do anything) and then charged. Half discharging batteries and recharging causes the memory problems people hate. I need to try Loutent's home discharge conditioning test before I get my Dewalt 9.6 battery packs rebuilt. The batteries are only 9 or 10 years old. Shouldn't they still work a long time before needing a charge? ;-)

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