8000 grit stone and Glazing, what to do

I do my final plane iron sharpening on the 8000grit stone and when I am lapping the back it gets really sticky and a black "glaze" appears. I soaked the stone and spray a bit of water on it as I work. The iron is really flat just like the stone and once the glazing starts it is really tough to move the iron on the stone.
What am I doing wrong and how do I correct this? Joe
Add pictures here
<% if( /^image/.test(type) ){ %>
<% } %>
<%-name%>
Add image file
Upload
Joe R. wrote:

1) Keep the stone submerged in distilled water when not in use.
2) Dress the waterstone with a diamond hone before each use. This will keep it nice and flat. You can also give it a good scrub with pumice and a scouring pad.
3) During use, keep the stone wet. The black glaze you see is tiny metal filings that bonded to the stone because it's not wet enough. Dressing the stone will deglaze it.
-- -linux_lad To verify that this post isn't forged, click here: http://www.spoofproof.org/verify.php?sig 7f7cd8ec1a04c092e309348a710942
Add pictures here
<% if( /^image/.test(type) ){ %>
<% } %>
<%-name%>
Add image file
Upload

????????????????????
Add pictures here
<% if( /^image/.test(type) ){ %>
<% } %>
<%-name%>
Add image file
Upload
CW wrote:

Waterstones, like hot women, perform best when wet. If you keep it submerged, you won't have to spend twenty or thirty minutes waiting for water to penetrate a dry waterstone. If you soak it in fresh, distilled water, you won't get any mold growth. If you do a lot of work with chisels, you'll come to appreciate having a stone ready for use all the time. If you're in a real hurry, a quick touch-up on the buffer with a dab of jewler's rouge will also do the job.
(apologies to the ladies) -- -linux_lad To verify that this post isn't forged, click here: http://www.spoofproof.org/verify.php?sig 1ea0d774cbbae0041e6428889eebc5
Add pictures here
<% if( /^image/.test(type) ){ %>
<% } %>
<%-name%>
Add image file
Upload
wrote:

My ex- was certainly fond of long soakings in the bathtub (where I keep my waterstones, now that I'm single) but she just never did get used to being rubbed down with that nagura stone to work up a slurry.
Add pictures here
<% if( /^image/.test(type) ){ %>
<% } %>
<%-name%>
Add image file
Upload
They do that at spas. Called "exfoliation," I believe. Guess it wasn't the same unless administered by some Latin or Mediterranean type....

Add pictures here
<% if( /^image/.test(type) ){ %>
<% } %>
<%-name%>
Add image file
Upload
Nice, chlorinated tap water is far less hospitable to mould, if you worry about that.

Add pictures here
<% if( /^image/.test(type) ){ %>
<% } %>
<%-name%>
Add image file
Upload
Joe, You need to use a Nagura Stone http://japanwoodworker.com/page.asp?content_id (17
Above is a line that will help explain the use and process.
Dave

Add pictures here
<% if( /^image/.test(type) ){ %>
<% } %>
<%-name%>
Add image file
Upload
John,
you have reached the point where the stone and iron are 'sucking' together. Personally, I wouldn't take it any further. The iron needs to be flat and smooth at the back leading edge only - not the entire back - so you may wish to concentrate on the first 1" or so only.
The 'glaze' you describe is a mixture of metal filings, water and stone slurry, a natural result of the sharpening process.
If you are really keen to have the entire back at a mirror shine, try only flattening 1/2 at a time. Another technique is to make a holder for the iron to give yourself more to grip.
--
Greg


"Joe R." < snipped-for-privacy@yahoo.com> wrote in message
  Click to see the full signature.
Add pictures here
<% if( /^image/.test(type) ){ %>
<% } %>
<%-name%>
Add image file
Upload
Thank you for the messages. I was going from a 1500 DMT diamond to a 8000 water stone and I just ordered a 3000 grit water stone to use after the 1500 DMT, as well as a magnifying glass to see my progress as I go through the different grits. When I get the new stone I will be sure to build up the slurry and work off of that. Joe Does anybody have a sharpness test other than shaving my arms or my wife's legs?
Add pictures here
<% if( /^image/.test(type) ){ %>
<% } %>
<%-name%>
Add image file
Upload
Apply the tool to the job at hand and see how it does.

Add pictures here
<% if( /^image/.test(type) ){ %>
<% } %>
<%-name%>
Add image file
Upload
Yes, use the tool. That is the point, isn't it? It often makes me laugh reading on here about people that, obviously, their whole purpose in life is to get the shiniest blade and will spend mass dollars and time achieving it. Now watch, the relentless rock rubbers will flame me.
test other than shaving my arms or my

Add pictures here
<% if( /^image/.test(type) ){ %>
<% } %>
<%-name%>
Add image file
Upload
snipped-for-privacy@yahoo.com says...

If you want to test the edge try shaving off oak end grain. If it comes off cleanly and leaves a smooth surface you have arrived.
I suggest you only attempt the test after using all your new stones and magnifying glass. That way you won't be kicking yourself in the ass for having spent so much money for so little return.
--
MikeG
Heirloom Woods
  Click to see the full signature.
Add pictures here
<% if( /^image/.test(type) ){ %>
<% } %>
<%-name%>
Add image file
Upload
wrote:

He could always get some of those 15000 and 30000 Shapton stones and enter sharpening contests. <G>
Barry
Add pictures here
<% if( /^image/.test(type) ){ %>
<% } %>
<%-name%>
Add image file
Upload

Related Threads

    HomeOwnersHub.com is a website for homeowners and building and maintenance pros. It is not affiliated with any of the manufacturers or service providers discussed here. All logos and trade names are the property of their respective owners.