8/4 Cost Per Boardfoot Versus 4/4 Cost?

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Would someone explain to me why 8/4 cost per boardfoot is almost twice the cost of 4/4 per boardfoot? I don't under stand how 4/4 oak is around $3.30 a boardfoot and an 8/4 is close to $7.00 a boardfoot. Rough cut in both cases too.
Again, the measurements are in boardfoot so the thickness shouldn't cost more on a boardfoot basis,
Otoe
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Otoe wrote:

2x per board foot seems a bit steep.
Steve Wall <www.walllumber.com> lists red oak 10" or more 4/4 at $3.20/BF and 8/4 at $3.85/BF. Doesn't say if the 8/4 is the 10" or more, if not, 4/4 select is $2.70, so 8/4 is $1.15/BF more or $3.30/LF more than 4/4. $3.85 vs. $2.70 is 42% higher. Maybe it's the supplier you are using
--
If you're going to be dumb, you better be tough

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Tue, Dec 11, 2007, 10:14pm (EST-2) snipped-for-privacy@hadenough.com (Mark & Juanita) doth sayeth: <snip> Maybe it's the supplier you are using
Depends partly on what part of the country one is in too.
JOAT I do things I don't know how to do, so that I might learn how to do them. - Picasso
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Think of it this way, is a 4 carat diamond only double the price of a 2 carat diamond? The bigger it is, the more it costs and the increase in price is a curve, not linear.
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But that's assuming larger sizes are rarer. In the case of lumber, shouldn't thicker boards require FEWER cuts, and therefore be cheaper per bf? To a certain extent, of course - I understand that super wide stuff is rare. I also understand that lumber prices vary a great deal by location, but I don't know how that would affect 8/4 vs. 4/4 pricing. Really I don't know much about lumber pricing and wood product economics, just tossing out my ideas.
For something a little more concrete than ideas, I'll toss out the link to my favorite lumber dealer, where bf prices for 8/4 are generally $1 more than the 4/4 prices. http://www.lakeshorehardwoods.com/LumberPricing.html Oak, Peruvian walnut, and mahogany are the only species with a bigger price disparity between 8/4 and 4/4, so maybe it's harder to find (or to sell) 8/4 oak for some reason.
Andy
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Nor do I, but time is money. And it takes (a lot) more time to grow thicker trees. If you cut thick lumber from smaller trees, you're going to get more instability in the resulting lumber.
jc
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No! Diamonds do not have to be cut to be weighed in carats.
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The price is on a curve because a tree only gives up so many boards. The wider, or thicker, the board, the fewer it gives up. Sure, there's a tad less waste with thicker lumber, but there are also fewer 2x6s in a log than there are 1x6s. The law of supply and demand for a tree simply states that when you get fewer of an item out of a particular basic material, you have to charge more per unit for that item.
That said, a few years ago, I lucked onto some 12/4 and 16/4 8" wide cherry that has lasted me until recently...at a price that was giveaway. Fortunately for me, the tree's owner didn't want the thick boards, so the mill sold them to me for $75 (basically, a full-sized pick-up load, with board ends almost dragging the ground all the way home (3 miles). I never figured the board feet, but the shortest board was 10' and the longest 13'. A guess gives me roughly 250 bf. The best part: a LOT of flame cherry in that mess (also a LOT of scrap).
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Well, yeah, but *that*much* more?
Interesting thing, though -- at the lumber supplier just up the road from me http://www.northwestlumberco.com/domestic.php the price premiums for 8/4 vs. 4/4 are 14% for ash, 25% for cherry, 20% for cypress, 25% for poplar, 50% for walnut -- all about what I'd expected -- and 68% for red oak and 78% for white oak!
Why would the premium be so much more for oak than for cherry?
And why is it only 4% on hard maple?
--
Regards,
Doug Miller (alphageek at milmac dot com)
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On Dec 12, 10:50 am, snipped-for-privacy@milmac.com (Doug Miller) wrote:

I can't even begin to guess: I wouldn't pay a cent premium for any thickness of white or red oak, but around here, red oak is a near dominant species (tulip poplar beats it, as does SYP), and white oak is plentiful. In fact, so is cherry and walnut and ash and...I've always been willing to buy green and rough and wait a couple, three years, which is a fine way to save a LOT of money on wood, if you have a planer and jointer on hand.
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(Doug Miller) wrote: I've

AND, the room to store the wood while it dries. If you have to build storage, the premium price for wood may look a little more attractive.
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"Otoe" wrote:

It's called the law of supply and demand.
Lew
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That could be it but there is also an inventory business model that supports charging more for slower moving expensive products. To justify the time the slower moving product sits on the shelf the seller marks up the price to justify the time and space being taken up.
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"Leon" wrote:

supports
time the

price to

SFWIW, years ago had a tennant who was in the hardwood lumber business.
He told me his cost/board ft was the same for either 4/4 or 8/4 lumber; however, the 8/4 retail price/bdft was more than the 4/4 price/bdft.
Lew
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That would sound right. Call it a "benefit of variety" mark up if you will. If the larger slower moving board has a turn over rate of 2 per year and the turn over rate on the smaller board is 6 times a year it would make more sense to not stock the slower moving larger board and stock more of the faster turning boards or mark the larger boards up so that the total sales profit is the same for either board in any given year. Every square foot in a warehouse and or retail floor space is an expense that has to be considered when deciding on how much of what to stock so that the net profit remains in the black.
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wrote:

It takes longer to dry 8/4 lumber. Time is money.
--
Regards,
Doug Miller (alphageek at milmac dot com)
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On Wed, 12 Dec 2007 13:09:48 GMT, snipped-for-privacy@milmac.com (Doug Miller) wrote:

absolutely! i think you found the brass ring doug. also the cost of fuel to run the kiln comes into play and we all know how that is! It takes more than twice as long to dry 8/4. I buy green and air dry it to save some money but that takes some planning ahead and sometimes ya just dont have the time!
skeez
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4ax.com:

Good question. Apparently, one of the mysteries of this life...
I'm hoping the Allah guy can help with this.
--
Posted via a free Usenet account from http://www.teranews.com


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Otoe wrote:

A longer drying time and stock more prone to warp/check are probably two reasons.
--
Jack Novak
Buffalo, NY - USA
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I would FIRST ask your supplier.
Then, shop around and compare suppliers.
If your primary supplier is out of line, try another. If not, suck it up - whatareyougonnado!
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