7" blade on 10" saw?

Page 1 of 2  

I recently bought a 10" table saw. A friend says the first thing I should do is put a good 7" blade on it because the 10 incher that comes with it bogs down the motor, and will burn it up faster. Is there anything to this, and what do you guys do?
Steve
Add pictures here
<% if( /^image/.test(type) ){ %>
<% } %>
<%-name%>
Add image file
Upload
Yes, and while you're at it, put smaller wheels on your car, reduces wear on the engine. Where do people come up with this stuff?

this,
Add pictures here
<% if( /^image/.test(type) ){ %>
<% } %>
<%-name%>
Add image file
Upload
Steve B wrote:

Haven't heard that one. Just about any motor will burn out if you push the stock through too quickly. Adding a smaller blade just adds to the problem because for any given motor speed it would require a slower feed rate. (The smaller the diameter of the blade, the slower the speed at which the teeth spin) Possibly the problem is the blade that comes with the saw isn't that great. If you invest in a good 10" blade, keep it sharp, slow down the feed rate you should be fine.
Good luck!
Add pictures here
<% if( /^image/.test(type) ){ %>
<% } %>
<%-name%>
Add image file
Upload
"Steve B" wrote in message

this,
Go to a 4" blade and the motor will last much longer ... guaranteed.
--
www.e-woodshop.net
Last update: 6/21/06
  Click to see the full signature.
Add pictures here
<% if( /^image/.test(type) ){ %>
<% } %>
<%-name%>
Add image file
Upload

Not as long as it will with no blade... Mac
https://home.comcast.net/~mac.davis https://home.comcast.net/~mac.davis/wood_stuff.htm
Add pictures here
<% if( /^image/.test(type) ){ %>
<% } %>
<%-name%>
Add image file
Upload
wrote:

Don't turn it on, and it will last even longer...
Puckdropper
--
Wise is the man who attempts to answer his question before asking it.

To email me directly, send a message to puckdropper (at) fastmail.fm
  Click to see the full signature.
Add pictures here
<% if( /^image/.test(type) ){ %>
<% } %>
<%-name%>
Add image file
Upload

Your friend is clueless. You would be reducing you cutting capacity to about 1-5/8" to 2" vs. 3-1/8 to 3-1/2" when making 90 degree cuts and when making 45 degree cuts down to about 1-1/4".
Buy a good quality 10" blade and you will be saving more than motor life.
Add pictures here
<% if( /^image/.test(type) ){ %>
<% } %>
<%-name%>
Add image file
Upload
Leon wrote:

Leon, by 7" I think the OP means 7-1/4", your standard CS blade (he rounded off I suspect). If that blade can only cut 2" at 90 or 1-1/4 at 45, then how do framers manage to cut dimensional lumber using CSs and 7-1/4" blades? On the other hand, maybe you're thinking that some TSs can't bring their arbors up that far, and with some brands that may be true, but my cheapo Ryobi BT3K can cut deeper than my Milwaukee CS, using the same blade, so I'm prone to thinking that the the cutting capacity would be fine as long as you are cutting wood as thick or thinner than dimensional lumber.
Actually (and to address everyone now, not just Leon), I'm a bit taken aback by the overwhelming unanimity of responses condemning the OP's friend's advice. I don't think the friend's reasoning is particularly compelling, but the advice is really good advice in some circumstances, so the eagerness of so many respondents to jump on the bandwagon with clever put-downs comes as a surprise. No one else does this?
In an ideal situation with most any TS, you'd get a decent 10" Forrest or Freud blade [that's traditional wisdom, although a recent WWer's Journal article rated most of the 10" blades and recommended the--gasp!--DeWalt and Rigid blades. Whatever. A good blade makes a world of difference.] and you'd have few regrets if any.
But it is a healthy bit you'll spend for that blade ($50-$120 or so). Freud 7-1/4" blades run about $10. Step up to a Freud 8" and pay $15-20 for a fine blade.
Many respondents also recommended going to a thin-kerf blade. Sometimes with under-power issues that's helpful. But a few years back, when the Wreck was inhabited by far more knowledgeable woodworkers (that's just my impression), the relative merits of thin-kerf blades were debated and condemned because of wobble and flex. Sure, you could put stabilizers on, but then what have you gained over using an 8" thin-kerf except paying more?
Smaller diameter blades are really handy when you want a decent cut but are working with reclaimed lumber--it's easy to be less nervous about ruining a $10 blade than a $100 blade.
On my 12" cabinet saw I keep a high-end 12" blade; on my Ryobi BT3K I pimp a Freud 8" (sometimes a 7-1/4") thin-kerf. Both get a lot of use, but the Ryobi cuts just as well with the 8" as with a good-quality Freud 10". Since it's less than 1/7th the price and I rarely cut anything over 8/4 anyway (and if I need to I have the other saw), the 8" seems like a better choice to me.
Am I missing something? You've all pretty much trashed the idea, but no one has addressed some of the benefits. It might be in the OPs best interest to give it a try.
Regards H
Add pictures here
<% if( /^image/.test(type) ){ %>
<% } %>
<%-name%>
Add image file
Upload
"hylourgos" wrote in message

aback by the overwhelming unanimity of responses condemning the OP's friend's advice. I don't think the friend's reasoning is particularly compelling, but the advice is really good advice in some circumstances, so the eagerness of so many respondents to jump on the bandwagon with clever put-downs comes as a surprise.<
Except that there are questions where a bit of time spent THINKING before asking would have produced an answer without utterance.
--
www.e-woodshop.net
Last update: 7/30/06
  Click to see the full signature.
Add pictures here
<% if( /^image/.test(type) ){ %>
<% } %>
<%-name%>
Add image file
Upload

yeah, but ya know that you can lead a horticulture but not make her think, right?
Mac
https://home.comcast.net/~mac.davis https://home.comcast.net/~mac.davis/wood_stuff.htm
Add pictures here
<% if( /^image/.test(type) ){ %>
<% } %>
<%-name%>
Add image file
Upload

I fear that this is not very good advice.
From my web site - Circular Sawbench Safety - Blades, I've extracted the following:
Using undersized blades increases the risk of accident because of the inefficient cutting which results from the low peripheral speed of such a blade. Such blades are more inclined to flutter, create a poor finish and/or deflect to one side. It is contrary to the UK factory regulations to use a blade of a diameter less than 60% of the of the sawbench's design size. (The drive of a saw bench is normally designed to give a speed of 3,000 metres/minute (10,000ft/min) with the intended blade).
so I suppose that 7" is within the 60% limit, but much of the above will apply.
Jeff G
--
Jeff Gorman, West Yorkshire, UK
email : Username is amgron
  Click to see the full signature.
Add pictures here
<% if( /^image/.test(type) ){ %>
<% } %>
<%-name%>
Add image file
Upload
Steve B wrote:

unless the saw you bought is *ridiculously* underpowered your friend is full of hot air. I have never seen a saw come from factory this underpowered.
what is the make and model of the saw? there are quite a few light duty saws out there with *marginally* underpowered motors. to compensate for this, there are also a lot of thin kerf blades on the market. if you are having horsepower issues, compensate with a thinner blade, not a smaller diameter one.
Add pictures here
<% if( /^image/.test(type) ){ %>
<% } %>
<%-name%>
Add image file
Upload
snipped-for-privacy@yahoo.com wrote:

My old Rockwell had a 3/4HP motor on it. It was designed for a 9" blade, and running smaller blades was that much easier on the motor.
Chris
Add pictures here
<% if( /^image/.test(type) ){ %>
<% } %>
<%-name%>
Add image file
Upload

Nope, not at all. Your friend should stick to offering advice in areas where he is knowledgeable -- if there are any.

I use a 10" blade on a 10" saw, and a 7" blade on a 7" saw.
--
Regards,
Doug Miller (alphageek at milmac dot com)
  Click to see the full signature.
Add pictures here
<% if( /^image/.test(type) ){ %>
<% } %>
<%-name%>
Add image file
Upload
This is silly advice and greatly reduces the utility of your saw. However, I would pass along one piece of advice I received from a tool demonstrator at the Springfield Grizzly store. This only applies to cabinet or other fine work involving 4/4 or similar stock.
If you shop around you will notice that 8" blades are often significantly cheaper than their 10" counterparts. They also have thinner kerfs. Mounting a GOOD 8" cabinet blade on your table saw, especially with blade stabilizers, will allow you to make a very clean, thin cut. And it's a litttle cheaper to buy and sharpen those blades.
Do I do this all of the time? No. I usually reserve the practice when I am working on smaller projects such as a jewelry box.
RonB

Add pictures here
<% if( /^image/.test(type) ){ %>
<% } %>
<%-name%>
Add image file
Upload
Get a reasonablt good brand of thin kerf blade. Should cost about $40-60. Wilson

Add pictures here
<% if( /^image/.test(type) ){ %>
<% } %>
<%-name%>
Add image file
Upload
Wrap the whole saw in Plastic Wrap and it will last 100 years.

Add pictures here
<% if( /^image/.test(type) ){ %>
<% } %>
<%-name%>
Add image file
Upload
"Steve B" writes:
>I recently bought a 10" table saw. A friend says the first thing I should >do is put a good 7" blade on it because the 10 incher that comes with it >bogs down the motor, and will burn it up faster. Is there anything to >this, and what do you guys do?
By all means, keep 10" blade, burn up cheap motor, then spend $300 to buy a 2HP, TEFC, 3,400RPM replacement unit.
Lew
Add pictures here
<% if( /^image/.test(type) ){ %>
<% } %>
<%-name%>
Add image file
Upload

And don't consult your friend on matters of tools.
--
Owen Lowe
The Fly-by-Night Copper Company
  Click to see the full signature.
Add pictures here
<% if( /^image/.test(type) ){ %>
<% } %>
<%-name%>
Add image file
Upload
Steve the saw came with the proper size blade. I think the factory knows best I hope you enjoy your saw and the things you will create using it.
Al

Add pictures here
<% if( /^image/.test(type) ){ %>
<% } %>
<%-name%>
Add image file
Upload

Related Threads

    HomeOwnersHub.com is a website for homeowners and building and maintenance pros. It is not affiliated with any of the manufacturers or service providers discussed here. All logos and trade names are the property of their respective owners.