6" jointer but 8-1/2" wide wood ???

I need to flatten some 8-1/2" wide 5/4 oak on a Jet 6" jointer. Thought about jointing one face then rotating the wood and jointing the remaining 2-1/2" (same face), Will this work??
I have a 12-1/2" Dewalt planer so once one face is flat, I can plane the other face.
Any tips or suggestion?
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How about sweat and a #6?
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Nope. That won't work, because the jointer will, by design, taper the wood. A jointer is used to get one absolutely flat surface. Then you run it through the planer to get the surfaces parallel.
Your best bet is to rip the board, joint it, then glue it back together. Done correctly, it's hard to tell.
Bob

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yes you can do it. plane at LEAST half the board by 1/16 and place a piece of laminate on the rabbetting table. flip the board around and guide the wood over the laminate. Voila! You can use double face carpet tape and take that thickness into account when you make the first cut. you could also do 2 1/32" cuts if you'd rather not cut a 1/16" all at once...
dave
JunkCan wrote:

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ok...i've heard it all now...

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you must lead a sheltered life... and you aren't too resourceful either!
Myxylplyk wrote:

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Method One: Nail or glue a 5/4 x 1 furring strip to each side then feed it through the planer. Take care to get the even alignment of the strips. I wouldn't suggest double sided tape as it may make a mess of the blades or pull out. CAUTION: If you nail, make sure they are NOT in the cutters path.
Method Two: As Bob said, cut, joint, thickness, rejoin.
Method Three: Build a sled for the thicknesser and sit the board on it. Use spacers to get it level.
Disclaimer: I have used 1 & 2, not 3; I've heard others have had success but would only do it for a large run of timber.
Greg

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.> Method Two:

You forgot Method Four Take it to a shop that has a 12" jointer and a$k them do it for you. Ed snipped-for-privacy@snet.net http://pages.cthome.net/edhome
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ah yes, money, the greatest leveller of them all .... :-)
"Ed said ...

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wrote:

Method five.
Take it to your local woodworking school, flip the owner the negotiated greenback, and do it yourself.
Barry
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Well, most, save Bob have given good answers. Bob has no concept of how a jointer works.
I don't think you need to get hung up on the idea of a _surfaced_ board to feed your planer. What you need is a board which will sit flat over its length. That's what the planer sled folks are doing. Most of the time this is possible by removing the high spots with a scrub or jack plane, though simply removing opposite corners on the jointer can take care of a lot of twist. Even in this, close is good enough, and alternate planing of imperfect sides can make it right.
The method of running 5" width to flat and end-for ending can produce boards flat enough for thicknessing as well, though I've always referenced the second cut to my first new surface rather than some elevated rabbeting ledge. If you're running only an additional 2", it references fairly easily to the additional four. One of the cuts, odds on, will be against the grain, and thus messy.

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Uhh, Joint 6 1/2" on the jointer and finish with a hand plane, or just do it with a handplane. :-)

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This is far and away the simplest and most effective solution.
Given that one has a planer, it is possible to get a good result by rotating the board on the jointer. You can joint 6" flat, then rotate & set the fence for the remaining 2.5", and joint that slightly lower than the first 6". The first 6" then serves as a flat reference for the planer to flatten the opposite side, which, once flat, serves as a reference to completely flatten the first side across the combined 6" and 2.5" width. This is very tedious, tho - the handplane will acheive the same result with far less effort.
John
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I admit it...I'm a plane moron. Exactly how flat can you get a board with a plane considering the plane is only a few inches wide and (unless you use an unusually long plane) about a foot of flat iron long.
I thought the purpose of having a long flat jointer is to use the length to work out any bow, the longer the jointer the better to remove bow. The extra length would also seem to help with twist since it is easier to get an "average" to start a flat part on the board to joint out the twist.
I know people have and do use hand planes to accomplish this, but it isn't obvious to me HOW this would work.
Jim
[snip]

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The jointer does all its work in the vicinity of the cutterhead, the rest is just support. Gravity aside, a jointer table could be one foot long and still maintain the piece firmly against the infeed table, cutter, and referenced to the outfeed. As a matter of fact, that's pretty much what a surface planer is! Upside down, of course.
Jeff Gorman's pages are a great source of information on the web, though any basic woodworking text covers the essentials. Hit the library.
http://www.amgron.clara.net /

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Well, you can get it as flat as you want it. Admittedly, if all you're going to use is a hand plane, it does take some skill.
However, for the question at hand the idea was to use the power jointer to flatten as wide a section as possible (6" in this case), and then use the plane to flatten the remaining width. Since the jointer produces a nice flat surface as a reference, all that's needed is a little care not to tilt the plane and the remaining portion can easily be flattened.

That's because on a jointer you work the whole board at once (in fact, it's difficult not to work the entire board). With a hand plane, you'd identify the high spots and work them down individually, gradually expanding the area covered until the entire surface (or edge) is flat. The skill comes in in being able to visually keep two or more high areas close enough to the same plane as you work them, that when your expanding areas meet they're close enough it only takes a few strokes to merge them. In the power jointer the long bed mechanically provides the reference that the hand planer does visually.
John
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But, if you're smart, you still take the high spots on your jointer first, same as hand planing, and end up with a board which is wider overall.

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I bought myself an old bailey #5, Garret Hack's book on hand planes, and started playing. The first thing I had to learn is what sharp really is. I just thought I knew before. Sharpen the plane, take a light cut (paper thin translucent shavings) and your on your way. I normally buy old planes on E-bay and for the most part I've had good luck.

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AHA! I suspected it took skill! Actually this makes a lot of sense. My Grandfather has a wood sole plane that is about 3 feet long and I could understand how this would work, but I never understood until now how the shorter planes could be effective.
Thanks a lot for taking the time to explain it. Jim

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Part 4 of "Get Straight with Crooked Wood" by Shane Shaunesy addresses this very topic. Woodcraft publishes a reprint of the article at <http://www.woodcraft.com/Woodcraft/assets/html/Jointer.asp .
Cheers,
Lowell
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