4/4 lumber is now less that 3/4" thick. Grrr

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Well, yes, but since when has 4/4 been only *eleven* sixteenths thick??
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yea, I kinda skimmed that part, and that's cheatin' a bit more, but just by a 1/16th
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On 7/15/12 9:20 PM, ChairMan wrote:

It's cheating by an eighth. A very important eighth.
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No, it's not. It's off by 1/8.
"4/4" implies hardwood (if it were softwood, it would be called one-by instead), and that means it's supposed to be surfaced to 13/16.
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Edward A. Falk wrote:

Buy rough. I just surfaced roughly 100 board feet of 4/4. The boards are now 15/16, some a bit under but more than 7/8, .
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dadiOH
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On Sun, 15 Jul 2012 17:39:30 +0000 (UTC), snipped-for-privacy@rahul.net (Edward A. Falk) wrote:

In reality depending on where you are this creates some oportunities. I'm in Washinton state so there is a fair amount available. It's convenient to pick up kiln dried lumber, but a tree guy I do stuff for had 5-6' diameter logs that he had resawn and kiln dried for flooring. So this could create oportunites for smaller vendors to come in and provide product.
Mike M
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Okay, in your case, Mike, you have to watch your Ps & Qs _and_ Gs. ;)
R
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On Mon, 16 Jul 2012 05:02:55 -0700 (PDT), RicodJour

I took typing from Leon
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On 7/16/2012 8:27 PM, Mike M wrote:

;~) +1
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On 7/15/2012 12:39 PM, Edward A. Falk wrote:

Your local yard if F'ed up. And or are you sure you did not buy 3/4? 11/16" is not the new 3/4 like plywood is.
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On Sunday, July 15, 2012 12:39:30 PM UTC-5, Edward A. Falk wrote:

Find another yard or a hardwood dealer. Even 5/4 is barely 15/16 from a lot of sources now. I have a couple of sources that provide 5/4 that is actually in the 1" to 1-1/8" range and they will cut and plane to any thickness I want as long as I buy 100bf or more. Get away from the commercial stores and find the guys who want to sell and serve.
But I do share your pain. I tried to buy some redwood a few weeks ago for patio furniture. In Kansas it is hard to even find redwood and I ended up with some of the 11/16 stock (mainly for decking). Not the best deal but that is what you are stick with on redwood in KS. Hardwoods are a very different story.
RonB
RonB
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On Sunday, July 15, 2012 1:49:33 PM UTC-5, RonB wrote:

I should have noted - most local mills will provide rough sawn hardwood that is at or even thicker than the nominal dimension. It has to be planed but I pick my own thickness. I bought a 17" x 45" chunk of "8/4" walnut from a guy a few months ago that is actually 2-3/8" thick. Gonna make a fat little rocking horse.
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On 7/15/2012 12:39 PM, Edward A. Falk wrote:

Hardwood lumber (and sheet goods) is simply one of those materials that you always need to verify dimensions before you buy.
It's always been that way, and it's best to assume that it always will be.
And, if you don't plan on dimensioning it yourself, you better buy enough to finish that project, plus 20%.
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