3" thick table top

I would like to make a 3" thick table top---36 X 36. I will be using kiln dried 3/4" pine. After gluing up 4 panels , what is the best way to glue the panels on top of each other? If I should use glue and screws I dont want any screws to show, or is just glue eneough? What kind of clamping procedure should I use? Thanks for any help on my project. Byron
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"Byron" wrote in message

Long grain to long grain glue joints should last longer than most Democrats or Republicans alive today.
You do need an even layer of glue on the surfaces and you need to apply clamping pressure across the entire piece at each stage, generally with clamps and cauls, the latter to give you even pressure across the surface.
Alternately, you can screw the various layers to each other from the underneath until the last layer, then just clamp it to your previously layers; or you can screw the last one to the other, previously glued layers, from the bottom where it doesn't show. You could also fill in those holes on the bottom with wood putty or plugs.
That should get you headed in the right direction.
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If using pipe clamps, alternate clamps top & bottom side. Most bar clamps will reach mid plane.
Swingman wrote:

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Most pine being flat sawn and wood movment being across the grain, if I were doing the job I would, as I do on my work benches, laminated 2" X 4" stock on it's side giving me a 3 1/2" top with no further gluing and plenty of stock left for wiggle room when cleaning up the squeeze out and flattening. Also, the most wood movement would be top to bottom not across the width of the top.
Properly glued screws shouldn't be needed for what you want to do but god knows what the thing will do when it starts to move.
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On Tue, 4 May 2004 11:00:32 -0400, "Mike G"

Musing on what you just said: It might take a bit longer, but why not glue and screw one at a time, after the first few? That is; glue and clamp a few to get started, then apply glue, apply strip, clamp, apply screws.
Wait .................................................
Undo clamps, remove screws, apply glue, apply strip, clamp, apply screws.
Wait ................................................
and so on, not screwing on the last piece, just clamping.
End result, no hidden screws, and the screws acted as clamps while the glue was setting. [Original clamps to hold tight while driving screws.]
Or, the last [and first] could have decorative brass screws.
Dan.
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"Danny Boy" wrote in message

If the OP does what Mike is talking about, there is absolutely no need to use screws. Mike's solution also has the additional benefit of taking wood movement out of the equation for the table top.
However, it sounded to me that the OP already had his wood picked out, and that is why I suggested what I did. In addition, the OP's design, as presented, will generally show a much more pleasing grain pattern, but unless this is old growth pine, it may not be a factor.
If that is not the case, then let me add the following to Mike's suggestion:
Do the glue-up in sections ... no wider than will readily run through your planer, then glue those sections together to make up your desired width. This will cut down on the number of glue joints that need to be cleaned and leveled. Again, no screws are needed at all.
Also, be sure to exceed the finished dimensions for the rough glue-up in both length and width. That way excess can be cut off to final dimension, leaving a much nicer edge.
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That takes care of Danny's question and the further refinements are excellent suggestions.
One thought though. While laminating will most probably result in a rather bland grain pattern on the surface of the top I'd have to opine that I hope if the original poster is using off the shelf Home Depot/Lowes construction pine rather then cabinet grade he spends considerable time matching grain for the top layer. I'd consider bland preferable to cathedral grain going every which way and having a panel made of X number of boards look like it was made from X number of boards. But, then again, it is a personal taste thing.
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what a stupid idea. just when the guy had a perfectly good excuse to go buy a bunch of bar clamps....
<G>
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LOL, there is that.
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snipped-for-privacy@aol.com (Byron) wrote in message

Get some good fir 2*4s and glue them together (with the 4 inch side up) and then plan 1/4 inch off of the top and bottom. You can do the same with 3/4 inch pine, it will just take twice as much work. This is much less work then the way you want to do it though. Scott
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On 4 May 2004 06:53:51 -0700, snipped-for-privacy@aol.com (Byron) wrote:

If i were going to do this, I think I would glue up individual boards to get the 3" thick pieces then joint and glue them together. If you have 36x36 panel they could be difficult to get good flat panels to glue to each other. In addition, gluing up and flattening 4 panels is more difficult than gluing up a stack of boards to 3 inch thick then making your panel
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Does it have to be solid, or will a torsion box @1.5" and your 3/4" pine top and bottom work?
Cheers,
aw
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