3 phase table saw in a single phase shop

Just purchased a 3 phase 5hp Jet JTAS 10XL table saw and now am working on getting it working in my single phase shop. If anyone has an opinion on which is best, please let me know. The saw will be used for hobby and not business use. Bought it used for $600 which seemed like a deal, so I bought first and asked questions later.
1) Keep the 3 phase motor and buy a converter. American Rotary gave me an estimate for a 7.5HP digital converter setup for $750. Seemed a bit pricey to me. 2) Buy a replacement 3HP single phase motor. JET quoted me $550 for the motor and $150 for a new switch. Also seems pricey.
They gave me specs on the converter, but I don't have them handy right now. I wonder if their suggestion is overkill. I would also like to know if I can use an alternative single phase 3hp motor with equivilent specs for a cheaper price. So, if anyone else out there has gone through this, I'd like to hear about it. Perhaps it would be best to sell and start over. Thanks
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I would not suggest a digital converter, from my understanding you have loss when you use digital. You need a rotary converter.
I have a 3hp 3ph saw and use a rotary converter. Once I had it configured I never had another issue.
One advantage of going with a converter is you can use it to power several machines at once, just don't start them at the same time. This allows you to buy other 3ph machines, which on craogs list can be cheaper because most people can't handle 3ph and those who can (bigger shops) usually lease new equipment.
I ended up with two other pieces of 3ph equip.
Look on craigs list for a rotary converter. The run a 3ph motor and it must equal or greater the size of the motor you want to run. If you buy a converter at least the money might spread over a few machines if you get more 3ph. You can also get new ones, and kits to build your own on eBay.
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I use a rotary for my 400v 3 phase surface grinders.
It was more expensive than I wanted but I did it.
For a single motor - I'd consider a VFD something like these : http://www.anaconsystems.com/text/opti_e23.html
Might be able to find surplus or from Gunnerarch in the metalworking group.
A rotary is the best route as it takes single phase as a motor input and has a generator section that makes three phase - typically with a wild leg. 220v is the typical input.
I had two motors for each unit - a speed possible motor and a pump.
So I went with a 5 HP rotary. You can have another rotary motor sitting on the line - without a load - e.g. bolted to a board.
Spin up the rotary add the motor and then you have the power ability of the rotary and the boost of power for surges and peaking.
Many use a lower power rotary and the hot standby motor as a total of a larger unit. Still you have another motor to deal with, but three phase motors are cheap at a motor repair guy.
Martin
On 11/29/2010 5:47 PM, SonomaProducts.com wrote:

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wrote:

Thanks for the info. Can I run a 5hp converter for a 5hp motor running a table saw?
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Yes - it is edgy - but I would spin an unloaded one for impulse energy when you bind the blade or for starting. The energy in the core is available for the real motor. It is like a storage device.
Odds are you will never use the 5HP yourself unless you really saw large hardwood and over drive you might need some or all of it.
The spinning motor starts after the rotary and then you start the saw.
They make static units that fit on the wall - They generate phase shifts by inductors and capacitors. Effective, but not energy wise.
Martin
On 11/30/2010 9:37 AM, Bacharu wrote:

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Thanks for the info. The converter, to me, looks like another motor that produces the 3rd phase. So do you have to turn it on first and then turn on your saw? Then turn off 2 devices when finished?
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All correct. I assume you could make it all via one switch at the saw somehow but I just have the convertor in the corner and switch it on when I need the saw or sander or shaper. I leave it running while I am actively using the machines and it sometimes runs for 10 or 15 minutes by itself between setups, etc. But I just switch it off if it will be longer.
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This will help you out with out all the wild ass guessing that appears here from time to time:
http://wiki.owwm.com/VFD%20Frequent%20Questions.ashx
and this will cover the rotary phase version:
http://wiki.owwm.com/Three%20Phase%20Frequently%20Asked%20Questions.ashx#GC_-_Rotary_Conversion_1
On 11/29/2010 6:28 PM, Bacharu wrote:

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Thanks for the link to the OWWM wiki. This helps me out.

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