3/4" auger bit recommendation

Can anyone recommend a good brand of auger bit for drilling 3/4" dog holes in a 1 3/4" maple workbench top? I have a brace and a variable speed 3/8" power drill. I assume the brace would be best for this job to avoid burning the screw tip. The only auger bits I can can find in the local Borg's are Irwin and they have very rough cutting edges - lots of burrs and chips. I'm sure there must be better brands.
--
To email me use: sjusenet AT comcast DOT net

Add pictures here
<% if( /^image/.test(type) ){ %>
<% } %>
<%-name%>
Add image file
Upload
If you have money to burn then a Forstners bit will do but you may be buying several.
n Sat, 11 Oct 2003 09:57:18 -0400, snipped-for-privacy@privacy.net (Steve James) wrote:

Add pictures here
<% if( /^image/.test(type) ){ %>
<% } %>
<%-name%>
Add image file
Upload

I've tried a good HSS Forstner bit with a variable speed hand drill on a piece of scrap maple. It took forever, required application of a lot more pressure than I like using with a hand drill, and it was difficult to prevent the wood from cartching fire, much less scorching. Maybe it would work better with a drill press but thats not an option for drilling a lot of dog holes in a benchtop. It seems like the wrong bit for making deep through holes. Forstners are good at making smooth sided flat bottomed holes but don't clear chips as well as augers and generate a lot of heat from friction. They also lack the screw point to pull the bit through the wood.
--
To email me use: sjusenet AT comcast DOT net

Add pictures here
<% if( /^image/.test(type) ){ %>
<% } %>
<%-name%>
Add image file
Upload
This is true but who will see the part below the first 1/2" ?
On Sat, 11 Oct 2003 12:49:30 -0400, snipped-for-privacy@privacy.net (Steve James) wrote:

Add pictures here
<% if( /^image/.test(type) ){ %>
<% } %>
<%-name%>
Add image file
Upload

All I can say is try it. After making one 3/4" diameter by 1 3/4" hole in hard maple with a Forstner bit on a hand drill you'll be looking for a better way to do it before you start the next 15 or so.
--
To email me use: sjusenet AT comcast DOT net

Add pictures here
<% if( /^image/.test(type) ){ %>
<% } %>
<%-name%>
Add image file
Upload

What? Last I checked, they could be sharpened. You really need a low RPM 1/2" drill, and pull it out often to clear the shavings.
It will work, honest!
--
Jim in NC



Add pictures here
<% if( /^image/.test(type) ){ %>
<% } %>
<%-name%>
Add image file
Upload
"Steve James" writes:

<snip>
Jamestown Distributors has Fuller.
I like the Fuller tools I have.
HTH
--
Lew

S/A: Challenge, The Bullet Proof Boat, (Under Construction in the Southland)
  Click to see the full signature.
Add pictures here
<% if( /^image/.test(type) ){ %>
<% } %>
<%-name%>
Add image file
Upload
snipped-for-privacy@privacy.net (Steve James) wrote in message

You can try to find some older Irwins or Russel-Jennings at antique shops. The old ones were fine.
--

FF

Add pictures here
<% if( /^image/.test(type) ){ %>
<% } %>
<%-name%>
Add image file
Upload

alternative- hole saw? Pat
Add pictures here
<% if( /^image/.test(type) ){ %>
<% } %>
<%-name%>
Add image file
Upload

It can be done but hole-saws do poorly when cutting a deep hole becuase the sawdust is hard to clear from the kerf.
--

FF

Add pictures here
<% if( /^image/.test(type) ){ %>
<% } %>
<%-name%>
Add image file
Upload
I agree. the double-twist on the Russell-Jennings is fantastic!!! Wish I could buy some more. Nearest thing is a good Forstner bit. Seems like most folks don't have a brace-and-biut anymore.
On 13 Oct 2003 11:12:20 -0700, snipped-for-privacy@spamcop.net (Fred the Red Shirt) wrote:

Add pictures here
<% if( /^image/.test(type) ){ %>
<% } %>
<%-name%>
Add image file
Upload
I do! Have all my Fathers' old bits, my brother had the brace and lost it! :-( bad brother! My wife got me a new one last Christmas and then thought I was crazy because i went out and used it. She thought i just wanted the "set". Must be all those power tools, she thought I couldn't use a hand tools. They cut very nice holes but I am not sure I would want to do all my dog holes that way. lot of work.
BRuce
Lawrence A. Ramsey wrote:

--
---

BRuce


Add pictures here
<% if( /^image/.test(type) ){ %>
<% } %>
<%-name%>
Add image file
Upload
BRuce <BRuce> wrote in message

I'm sure that your dog wouldn't appreciate it either.
Ahem,
One approach would be to not sril them all at once. Just keep the bit handy and whenever you need to use a bench dog drill the hole exactly where you need it. After a few projects, you won't need to drill any more.
The bench will look odd, but it will be highly functional. I read of one person who took that approach and his bench reached the point where no new holes were required for new projects without the benchtop becoming too busy with holes.
--

FF

Add pictures here
<% if( /^image/.test(type) ){ %>
<% } %>
<%-name%>
Add image file
Upload
I'm sure my neighbor's dog would not appreciate it but at times it would be tempting. ;-) I don't have one myself, dog that is.
Hadn't thought about "as needed" dog holes. that is certainly worthy of some thought.
BRuce
Fred the Red Shirt wrote:

--
---

BRuce


Add pictures here
<% if( /^image/.test(type) ){ %>
<% } %>
<%-name%>
Add image file
Upload

Thanks for everyone's advice. I've found at least a couple possible answers to my original question so I'm answering myself.
Clifton, the English company which has become well known for their hand planes, is making new high quality auger bits in the Jennings pattern. http://www.toolsforworkingwood.com/Merchant/merchant.mvc?Screen=PROD&Sto re_Code=toolshop&Product_Code-63579.XX&Category_Code=CLLH
The 3/4" costs more than 2X a new Irwin Auger bit but it looks like a case of getting what you pay for. These new bits have the traditional tapered four sided shank so are made exclusively for use with braces. Go Neanders!!
Rockler has some new HSS brad point bits with hex shanks that ought to work in power drills or most braces. They have sizes up to 1" and seem like a good deal but are not yet in stock.
http://www.rockler.com/ecom7/product_details.cfm?&offerings_id 613&cat id=7&objectgroup_id0
--
To email me use: sjusenet AT comcast DOT net

Add pictures here
<% if( /^image/.test(type) ){ %>
<% } %>
<%-name%>
Add image file
Upload
I used an Irwin 3/4" auger bit (got mine at Lowes) when I finished my bench top about 9 mos ago. Worked just fine, and the reulting holes were more than adequate for the pupose. Given that this will probably end up being a single use bit, I couldn't see spending more than the $10 - $12 I paid for it.
One word of caution - the auger bit is self feeding, and can really generate some torque, even when using an inexpensive 1/2" drill. Watch your wrist!
Ron
Add pictures here
<% if( /^image/.test(type) ){ %>
<% } %>
<%-name%>
Add image file
Upload
Rkola wrote:

take a slip or stone to it. I've never used auger bits in a power drill. I've always used them in a brace. I would expect that a power drill, would feed them much too fast and tearout would be a wonder to behold. Using a bit brace and an auger bit to make 16 or more 3/4" holes in hard maple at that depth is not that difficult or tiring. Take your time, strop or hone the bit when it 'pears to need it. There's a bunch of 1/2" or better power drills that will do the job (don't use an auger bit) with a twist drill. Tearout will be on the underside of the bench. Nobody will know it's there but you. Like Rick Nelson said " only have to please yourself". Hank
Add pictures here
<% if( /^image/.test(type) ){ %>
<% } %>
<%-name%>
Add image file
Upload
Steve James asks:

See if you can find a brad point bit that will fit your brace. If not, use it in a cordless drill, at relatively low speed, light pressure, frequent lifting to clear debris.
Auger bits are cleaner working than spade bits, but are still primarily construction bits, meant to drill holes in framing.
Charlie Self
"The income tax has made liars out of more Americans than golf." Will Rogers
Add pictures here
<% if( /^image/.test(type) ){ %>
<% } %>
<%-name%>
Add image file
Upload

Related Threads

    HomeOwnersHub.com is a website for homeowners and building and maintenance pros. It is not affiliated with any of the manufacturers or service providers discussed here. All logos and trade names are the property of their respective owners.