2x6 T&G spruce for flooring

After a year of working on converting my garage to a studio/living spac
I finally reached the time to do the floor, and I am planning to pu down 2x6 spruce T&G boards. I haven't gotten those yet, but I alread have 3/4 inch plywood, which I was going to glue down on the cement Someone suggested using Bostik MVP4 Moisture Vapor Protection for this Then, on top of that would go the T&G. Can some smart person please tel me if my plan will work? This MVP4 is very expensive. Is there a mor economical way of achieving the goal of moisture protection? Is the 2x spruce a good idea? How do I nail it onto the plywood? Any ideas o advice would be terribly appreciated. Mariann
-- Marianne Halevi
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Better to consult local building codes to get the best suggestion. Different locations will treat insulation and vapor barriers differently depending on the climate that is normal for any particular area.
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Glue down plywood, then the moisture barrier, then more wood? Won't the moisture barrier assure than any moisture saturates the plywood?
It is not the way I'd do it, but someone probably knows better than I. If it was me, I'd put the barrier first, then sleepers with insulation between, then sub floor and flooring. I'd not us 2x unless is was very cheap. Just seems like too much wood for no good reason.
Considering the investment if both time and material, I'd not try to save $50 on the barrier material either.
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2 x 6 T&G material is quite heavy for this type of installation. You will not be able to solidly nail it down to a layer of plywood and if it is bowed, warped or twisted you will never hold it in place. If the wood happens to move after it is installed, it could rip loose of the plywood or pull the plywood up. I would look into a more "standard" tried and tested method of construction.

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EXT Wrote:

Thank you guys so much for setting me straight about the 2x6. I think originally thought of using that because I didn't want the v-groove that you get with the regular T&G, and my local lumber yard had thi 2-by with one side flush. Maybe I can get the 1-by T&G with flush edge too. As to the vapor barrier, it WAS planned to go UNDER the plywood not on top, and you are right, that's not worth being stingy about Sleepers are a good idea too, but I live in California with hardly an rain, so I don't need the additional insulation, I think. So, thank again, and if you have any more good ideas on this subject - wonderful
-- Marianne Halevi
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In my slab portion of the house I put engineered wood and it saves a lot of the labor you are going to do. www.mannington.com is one brand, but there are many others. After 4 years, the finish still looks perfect.
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Edwin Pawlowski Wrote:

-- Marianne Halevi
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