2hp on 20 amp circuit

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It might be worth considering if you actually find that the jointer has a problem with the 2 hp motor.
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You're living on the edge as it is. When that breaker trips the lights do out. That is not a lot of fun with power tools. Since you are buying a jointer, I assume you are running other power tools also. What is the DC going to run on?
Your options may not be as limited as you think. There are was of getting power that may seem illogical, but are done all the time. Fishing a wire 90 feet may be a PITA, but it is also possible to run a line outside along the house and back into the garage. There are safe and code compliant ways of doing that. Talk to an electrician and he'll probably have a half dozen solutions to give you plenty of power for many tools. He will probably want to keep the lights and add circuits for the tools. Ed
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If the breaker box is 90' away, the voltage drop will kill you. http://www.electrician.com/vd_calculator.html

It took me 2 hours and maybe $40 in materials to run a 240v line 80' to my TS. Certainly that is a better idea than replacing a motor! Don't you want to use a DC with your jointer? How are you going to do that? In fact, if you have 2 amps going to your lights, then you will be trying to put 24a on a 20a circuit just for the jointer; a horribly bad idea. I never use more than one tool at a time, but I have a 240v and 3 120v circuits to my shop; and it is not much of a shop. Somebody suggested putting in a 60a subpanel. I wish I had done that, but I put them in one at a time, thinking each would be the last one.
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Geez... Where do you buy your electrical materials??? 6 years ago I spent $50 for 30' of cable and 2 electrical ends for 220 bolts.
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Garage sales and auctions. I have bought 250' of cable for $5, and that is not unusual.
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I don't disagree with the others that it will kinda work as long as you don't mind tripping breakers and all the safety issues that involves.
But I would also warn against voltage drop. That can really kill a motor and yours will be pretty bad on a 20a line. If you can convert to 240v and put in a new circuit, that would certainly be the right thing to do.
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I agree that the best solution is an upgrade to 220 v circuit. But this will take two slots in your breaker box, so you will need to have an empty slot or give up a current circuit - but you would not have to chanage the wire, only the receptacle. And, of course, the connection to the motor has to be redone (which is probably possible for this size motor). But if you do decide to keep it on 110 v, make sure that the wire size on the current 20 amp circuit is 12 gauge or larger (10 guage would be preferable). I have seen many cases where someone at some time simply replaced a 15 amp breaker on 14 gauge wire with a 20 amp breaker w/o changing the wire. That is dangerous!!!
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dondone wrote:

Not necessarily.
Many brands of breaker panels can accommodate half-sized double pole breakers. Some panels will only take them in certain slots, but moving breakers isn't usually a big deal.
Barry
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Really? Which ones?
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TBone wrote:

I think mine are either Square D or GE.
The breakers are even sold in HD & Lowes. One of my panels will only accommodate half space breakers in the bottom 6 slots (3+3), the other, larger panel will take many more. The very modest house (not custom by any means) was built in 1990, so they aren't THAT new.
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I know what you are talking about at HD but IIRC, none of them support 220V but I could be wrong. In order for that to happen, the double half sized breaker would need to come in contact with both poles and I am unaware of any box that would support that or how it could even be done unless the box has slots reserved for only that type of breaker. All of the double single slot breakers I've seen just give you two 110V circuits in the space of 1 but they are both on the same pole. I have to go to HD later and now you have me curious so I will head to the electrical department to check that out.
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I think he's talking about a quad breaker. You can run four 110v, two 110v and a 220v, or two 220v circuits off a two slot quad breaker.
In the case he is discussing, it is a half, two halves tied together for a 220, and another half. The center two halves do take up a "single slot space", the catch is you need to have a half above and below it because it needs to span two poles.
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Actually, he is correct. While at the Home Depot, I checked it out. Only GE offers this odd setup but they really do have single unit 2 pole breakers. In order to use it however, it requires removing two standard breakers ( if the panel is full) as it sits between where the two standard ones fit. To fill in the gaps you will need to buy two half size breakers but on the positive side, by doing that you will get your 220V circuit WITHOUT losing any of your 110's and you get a spare full size breaker (in case one fails, LOL) as well.
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TBone wrote:

Exactly!
I forgot about needing the 1/2 spacers, as it's been a while since I installed additional shop circuits.
Barry
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"Many brands of breaker panels can accommodate half-sized double pole

We built our house almost 40 years ago and used some of these duplex breakers then, they came from Sears, I think they are square D.
"the double half sized breaker would need to come in contact with both poles "
Switch a couple of 110 circuits onto a duplex breaker, use the vacated space for the 220v.
Walt Conner
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snipped-for-privacy@somewhere.org wrote:

No, I'm not. <G>
It's a double-pole, SINGLE slot breaker. Similar units are available as single pole, single slot, double breakers that provide two 115v circuits in ONE slot.
Before others tell me what I really mean, I'll describe it section by section:
The breaker: - is ONE space wide - has TWO hot wire terminals - has both poles tied together so either hot leg will trip both - feeds from BOTH sides of the panel, via buss bars integral to the panel - is branded GE - will only work in certain slots in the panel
I also have identical versions without the poles tied together.
Barry
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TBone wrote:

My boxes have buss bars that run from one side to the other to provide both poles on both sides of the box. I looked last night, they're GE. The house is a very modest spec house built in 1990, so I'm sure the box wasn't some expensive, custom order sort of thing.
Standard breakers can (and were, in my case) be inserted into the half-space compatible slots, but only make contact with the buss bar service that side of the panel.
Trust me, they exist. My DC, cabinet saw, jointer run off half space breakers every day.
Barry
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What are you going to use it for ? If it's a question of start-up current, then so long as it doesn't have a huge cast iron head, then you should have no trouble. If you're intending to use it for typical "amateur" use with some occasional need for the extra width, then that's OK. Only if you're planning on smoothing down rough pitch pine with heavy cuts because you're in a hurry is a 2hp motor really going to need to draw that sort of current.
Personally I'd use it. But I might adjust the overload relay in the motor starter so that _that_ was what tripped first, rather than the fusebox breaker. It's not good practice to repeatedly trip fusebox breakers, they don't have the wear lifetime for it.
OTOH, I'd be lost without my 3hp cabinet saw. If this feed is the best you have to your whole workshop, then I'd certainly want to upgrade it. My own workshop has no dedicated feed at all - fortunately I'm in the UK where every outlet is 4hp as standard 8-)
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You will love the 8 inch Yorkcraft, I have one and it is wonderful once adjusted. Change over to 220 is very simple, instructions in the motor "peckerhead". In fact, my motor came wired for 220. Dave
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Cant rewire to 220V? half the amps if twice the voltage.
Doug

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