220v wiring for big tools


Hi:
I don't have any big tools yet other than an arc welder, but I am wiring my shop now and want to be 220v ready for when I do. I don't envision a motor larger than 3HP, so figure I will run 10/3 cabling for all but arc welder where 8/3 will be run.
My question concerns how to best stub out the box and recepticle? Should I use 2x4 or 4x4 boxes and is there a standard recepticle than most 220v woodworking tools use? If so, what would the markings be such that I can find it at the building store?
Thanks.
Jonathan
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On 8 Sep 2006 12:56:46 GMT, Jonathan Mau wrote:

I standardized on a NEMA 6L-20 locking plug & outlet for all of my 220V tools. It is a twist-lock 3-wire connector.
All of my 220V tools came without a plug. If any of yours come with a plug, its easy enough to cut the plug off and put on a 6L-20.
You could use a 6L-30 for your welder.
A 6L-20 female outlet will fit a single-gang box. I think a 6L-30 will, too.
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Art Greenberg
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wrote:

If you decide that a 6L-20 is way too expensive, try a normal 20 amp plug and outlet. They look just like regular plugs except the tines are horizontal rather than vertical. You can get them at Lowes or Home Depot for less than 1/4 the price of the 6L-20.
My unisaw came with this connector as did my dust collector. You can use a standard 2x4 outlet box and just get a cover with single round hole.
Gary
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On Fri, 08 Sep 2006 14:14:06 GMT, snipped-for-privacy@hotmail.com wrote:

I believe you will find that those are 15 amp plugs and receptacles.

And other than the locking variety, if you decide to go that route, that is the one I would recommend.
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LRod

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I would do it two ways....
(1) 120v in the wall outlets (use the four outlet boxes) (2) ALL 220 in plastic conduit surface mounted. (3) Stick with a very common plug and receptacle for all of the 220v (6L-20)
I suggest the conduit cause it is MUCH easier to move or add on to when you start moving things around. I have 220 outlet about every 6-8 feet.
Jonathan Mau wrote:

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On 8 Sep 2006 12:56:46 GMT, snipped-for-privacy@FreeNet.Carleton.CA (Jonathan Mau) wrote:

If 3 HP is the largest you're going to run, you need not go bigger than 12/3. If you're going to wire 10/3, you'll be able to run a 5 HP motor.

If you insist on 10/3, do NOT try to use a 2x4 box. You will be very sorry trying to maneuver that thick wire around in that tiny space.
The 6-15 series (two horizontal blades plus a ground) seems to be the defacto standard on machines equipped with cords and plugs.
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LRod

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On Fri, 08 Sep 2006 16:22:55 +0100, LRod wrote:

I used stranded 10/3 in PVC conduit, and I had no such trouble in single-gang boxes. I agree, if one is using solid wire, a double box would be better.
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Jonathan Mau wrote: > Hi: > > I don't have any big tools yet other than an arc welder, but I am wiring my > shop now and want to be 220v ready for when I do. I don't envision a > motor larger than 3HP, so figure I will run 10/3 cabling for all but arc > welder where 8/3 will be run. > > My question concerns how to best stub out the box and recepticle? Should > I use 2x4 or 4x4 boxes and is there a standard receptacle than most 220v > woodworking tools use? If so, what would the markings be such that I can > find it at the building store?
When it comes to planning an electrical distribution system, "bigger is better" is a good approach.
I'd plan on at least one 2P-40A circuit using #8AWG for a future air compressor.
Use 2 gang (4x4) boxes for all receptacles, you will appreciate the space when it is time to make connections.
I have standardized on 30A locking devices for all 240V equipment connected with #10AWG wire.
Certainly not required for every machine, but it makes life simple.
Have fun.
Lew
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You've had some good responses (some not so good). To answer your direct question, "is there a standard receptacle than most 220v woodworking tools use? If so, what would the markings be such that I can find it at the building store?"
No, there seems to be no standard. I too converted all of my 220v tools to NEMA 6L-30 locking plugs. Welders, table and bandsaw along with the dust collection system.
I used EMT conduit and 5S boxes and covers. All wires were individual THHN wires. I would avoid the 10/3 or 8/3 wrapped cables. They are harder to pull and more difficult should you need to split up or add too should you need (and you will) make changes.
I have used this setup now in three shops and have never regretted it.
Dave
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snipped-for-privacy@FreeNet.Carleton.CA (Jonathan Mau) writes:

I always use 4x4 boxes, even for single devices (using a plaster ring). Gives plenty of room in the box for splices.
Standard recept is a NEMA 6-15R or 6-20R. You might wish to consider using NEMA L6-15R or L6-20R (twist-lock).
<http://www.leviton.com/sections/techsupp/nema.htm>
scott
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On Fri, 8 Sep 2006 06:56:46 -0600, Jonathan Mau wrote

Bigger IS better. You'll hear all sorts of advice on wire size, etc. but for a box it is best to use as large (cubic inches) as you can fit. I'd go with a 4x4 metal since the size allows room for al the wire connections etc. and metal since it'll avoid (or at least reduce) thread issues. You only are doing a few versus dozens used in a typical house so cost savings isn't really an issue. -Bruce
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Jonathan Mau ( snipped-for-privacy@FreeNet.Carleton.CA) writes:

Thank you for all the replies. I especially appreciate the link to the leviton table which shows all the plug types.
A quick supplemental question. When you folks say to use a 4 inch box, you are referring to the type that a dryer recepticle typically uses, and not a double regular so to speak. I believe the former only takes a metal cover plate whereas the latter takes all the usual plastic covers.
Thanks again.
Jonathan
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writes:

A 4 square metal box with a mud ring (drywall ring). It will let you put a regular face plate on it. That's all I ever use.
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