220V 3-Phase or just 220V

I've narrowed down my choice of Cabinet Saws to 2. However, I am confused as to what exactly a 3 Phase motor is. The 2 Grizzly machines I am looking at is the 5HP 220V G1023ZX ($1,150) or the 5HP G1023ZX3 ($1,195). The $45.00 difference between is not important. I just want to make sure that I understand what I am getting.
Does anyone want to lend their .02?
Thanks
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A 3-phase motor is designed to run on 3-phase power. Unless you're in a manufacturing space (or in the UK, I think), you're going to have single-phase power delivered to your shop. I gather the G1023ZX is the single-phase version, so I would go with that.
todd
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On 27 Jan 2005 01:00:40 -0500, diverse snipped-for-privacy@msn-dot-com.no-spam.invalid (diverse_guy) wrote:

Rule of thumb:
If your shop is in a private residence your chances of having three phase available approaches zero. Order single phase tools.
If your shop is in a commercial space there is a good chance you have three phase available to you--check with your landlord. Then you have to make a choice.
I am not familiar with three phase operations, so my usefulness stops here. But I suspect you're a home shop guy, so perhaps I at least clarified that for you.
- - LRod
Master Woodbutcher and seasoned termite
Shamelessly whoring my website since 1999
http://www.woodbutcher.net
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Hey Thanks for the info! That totally makes sense. Now I am left with 3 choices.
I guess I need to decide on getting the: 1023SL which is 3HP Left tilt $995 1023Z which is 3HP $1050 or throwing out an extra $100 for the 1023ZX which is a 5Hp and cost $1150
I've read that left tilt is best. is this always true?
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If it were true, nobody would be making right tilt models. There's a whole lot of factors to consider such as being left handed or right handed, what you will be cutting the most, possibly space constraints, such things as mounting a router in one of the wings, what you're used to and just general preference. I'm sure there's more considerations, but you get the idea.
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Hi DG/ Go here and search rec. woodworking using left right tilt. Lots of good info and opinions. Cheers, JG
http://groups.google.ca/groups?hl=en&lr=&ie=ISO-8859-1&q=left+right+tilt&meta=group%3Drec.woodworking
diverse_guy wrote:

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As to HP. If you can afford it, go for the 5HP. If you're like me, you're expecting any tool you pay 1000 bucks for to last as long as you do, and then some. Even if you never need the additional HP, for 150$ - you'll never wonder. It's there if you ever do, and you're buying something for keeps. Yes?
Dave

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Get 5 hp if you will be power feeding all day long every day. Other wise 3hp is almpost over kill. I use 3hp to resaw 5" wide Ipe boards awith no sign of the saw straining. Ipe is 3 times harder than Oak.

;~) The single most asked question in this group that I paste this rubber stamp answer to.
Both saws will make all the same cuts. Some easier on the left tilt, some easier on the right tilt. Strictly personal preference. But if you need to be steered one way or the other,
Advantages:
Are you right handed?
Get the left tilt.
1. Left tilt has the bevel wheel on the right side and is easily turned with your Right hand.
2. Left tilt can rip a narrow bevel with out having to move the fence to the left side of the blade.
3. Left tilt allows the blade arbor nut to be removed with your right hand.
4. Left tilt allows your to remove the arbor nut and turn it in the direction that you would expect.
5. With a Left tilt, when both edges of a board are beveled, the sharp point of the bevel is up on the fence when cutting the second bevel as opposed to the bottom of the fence where it might slip under.
6. RIGHT tilt if you are left handed. The bevel wheel is on the left side of the saw.
7. RIGHT tilt if you "must" use the fence distance indicator when using a stacked dado blade set. The blades stack left, away from the fence. The indicator remains accurate. On the left tilt, the blades stack towards the fence and makes the indicator inaccurate. In this case use a tape measure to set the fence distance.
8. RIGHT tilt allows you to remove the arbor nut with your left hand but the nut must be turned clockwise to loosen. Bassackwards to normalcy.
If considering a cabinet saw, with wide 50" rip capacity.
The Left tilt will most often afford you the most storage room under the right table extension. The RIGHT tilt has an access door in that location that will demand room to open. The left tilt allows you to have access to the motor and or the insides of the cabinet from the more open left side of the saw with out having to crawl under the right extension table. Very nice if you ever happen to drop the arbor nut inside the cabinet. If you are considering getting a replacement saw and considering going to the opposite tilt this time consider that the miter slots may not be the same distance from the blade when comparing a left to right tilt saw. This may or may not be of concern but something to consider.
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The 5HP will blink the lights a tiny bit more and will need a bigger breaker and wire. A three phase machine will suffer severe resale penalty, unless you are lucky and a 3 phase buyer shows up. Wilson

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This misses the main issue rather badly: If he doesn't have 3-phase power available to him, then buying a machine with a 3-phase motor doesn't make any sense at all. In which case, the resale penalty won't be terribly high, as he'll be selling a new, never-used tool.
-- Regards, Doug Miller (alphageek-at-milmac-dot-com)
Get a copy of my NEW AND IMPROVED TrollFilter for NewsProxy/Nfilter by sending email to autoresponder at filterinfo-at-milmac-dot-com You must use your REAL email address to get a response.
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Doug Miller wrote:

There is always the pahse converter route. A rotary unit can be built or purchased. A 5 hp unit can be bought for about $500.00. This does, however add a significant cost to the machine. It really only makes sense if you have multiple 3-phase motors that you need to power. In that case, one probably will want to get an over sized unit.
--
Al Reid

"It ain't what you don't know that gets you into trouble. It's what you
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wrote:

Well, yeah, but the OP was asking if he should buy a 3-phase or single-phase machine. If he has single-phase power, then buying a 3-phase machine and a phase converter, when he could just buy a single-phase machine, is insane.
-- Regards, Doug Miller (alphageek-at-milmac-dot-com)
Get a copy of my NEW AND IMPROVED TrollFilter for NewsProxy/Nfilter by sending email to autoresponder at filterinfo-at-milmac-dot-com You must use your REAL email address to get a response.
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Thanks everyone for your input. It looks like I will be going for the left tilt, and sticking with a single phase 3hp or 5hp Green Monster :) I am right handed and this is my first table saw, and I've been saving up my pennies. I was also able to use the Grizzly online shop program and space does not seem to be an issue once I added all of the items that I want in my 16' x 12' workshop.
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diverse snipped-for-privacy@msn-dot-com.no-spam.invalid (diverse_guy) wrote in

Regarding that last part: If this is your first table saw, you _may_ not have allowed for sufficient infeed and outfeed room for your saw. When cutting small parts, no big deal. When the rips and crosscuts get to desk, bookcase and tabletop sizes, you need to allow for the full length and width of the parts to clear the sharp, wizzing parts on the way in, as well as on the way out.
This detail sometimes escapes even more experienced wooddorkers, when they are trying to arrange their limited space to accomodate that new (to them, at least) acquisition. DAMHIKT.
Space, tables and benches can be used for multiple purposes, as long as there are no walls, columns or immobile tools in the way.
Enjoy your new saw.
Patriarch
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A three phase circuit has 3 power conductors, each of which is "hot". It may also have a ground conductor. The phase angle of the power in a conductor differs from that of the adjacent conductors by 120 degrees.
A three phase induction motor will start by merely turning on the power. A single phase induction motor requires various kinds of trickery to induce the motor to start. Consequently, the starting current of a single phase motor can be quite high. The schemes used to start single phase motors add cost and reduce reliability.
However, it is more expensive for the utility companies to supply three phase power to homes; hence over here in the US, it has not been available to home owners since the early 60s.
Jim
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