220 VAC Wiring/Plug Question

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Good to know. Thanks.
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Charles Krug wrote:

How will you get 220V without having 110v? 220 basically uses the 110 circuitry anyway. Not saying its legal. But from the point of view of not mixing voltages it wouldnt make sense. From the point of view of not mixing breakers it would.

While what you say is loosely true, your wires are actually sized to your circuitbreaker or larger. Never smaller. Your CB will be based on the current you wish to provide and how much is available.

Only difficult part is getting shocked. Outside of that, screwing down bolts and running wire through tube is not too tough.

true. Consider if you want a permit as well.
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"Then said I, Wisdom [is] better than strength: nevertheless the poor
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Getting shocked - difficult??? Heck - ain't nothing difficult about getting shocked.
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-Mike-
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1/2" conduit unlikely, but possible with some grease (wire pulling grease) two hot wires 12 gauge and one 10 gauge for neutral 30 amp 220 volt, three 10 gauge will not fit. plus the two at least 14 gauge wire for a 15 amp 120 volt, 12 gauge for 20 amp. Fitting wires to tightly in the conduit can cause problems beyond just pulling them. I would pull the current wires out and pull the whole new set both 120 and 220 it is just easier. Reuse the original wire.
Mark (sixoneeight) = 618
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Amperage generally isn't a problem when running shop tools at 220V. The current is half what it would be at 110V, so 20 amps is usually more than sufficient.
Likewise, having a long power cord on your tools is usually less of an issue at 220V. Power (in watts) dissipated in the cord = I^2*R, where I is current (in amps) and R is the resistance of the cord (in ohms). Since current is half at 220V, the power dissipated in the cord is 1/4 what it would be at 110V. Thus, you can have a cord four times as long as you could at 110V. And even then the cord wouldn't get as hot because the power would be dissipated over a greater length.
I'd put a pair of standard 20 amp 220V outlets every 10 or 15 feet, fed with 12/3 (plus ground) wire. Since your tools won't need a neutral connection, you could also get away with 12/2 wire, but for the small extra cost of the 3-conductor wire, it could potentially save you or a future owner of your house some confusion and danger, since you'd have to use the white (normally neutral) wire as hot.
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NEMA 6-15P for 240 volts, 15 amps.
NEMA 6-20P for 240 volts, 20 amps.
If your machines came with a molded corset, they most likely conformed to those configurations.
Use 12 AWG wire for these, and install a NEMA 6-20R, which will accept both the NEMA 6-15P and NEMA 6-20P.
Other configurations are available for 30, 40 and 50 amp loads.
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For those who don't know, the 20 amp outlet will accept a 15 amp plug, much like the 20 amp 120 VAC outlets.
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I don't know if anyone has suggested this, using twist lock works great (better holding = better contact) Just my $0.02 Frank
rich wrote:

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