220 V table saws and ground

Page 8 of 9  


IL, NY, and VT, too. Not sure when they did it in AL (we've only been here a year) but all the new developments are underground.

Bad assumption. Underground utilities aren't coming out of the politicians pockets either. Politicians never care about unfunded mandates.
Add pictures here
<% if( /^image/.test(type) ){ %>
<% } %>
<%-name%>
Add image file
Upload
krw wrote:

Utilities here are regulated by the State, and payola to politicians for favorable regulation, would of course, never cross their minds, and politicians would never think to accept such favor.
Yeah, right ... ;)
--
www.e-woodshop.net
Last update: 10/22/08
  Click to see the full signature.
Add pictures here
<% if( /^image/.test(type) ){ %>
<% } %>
<%-name%>
Add image file
Upload

Underground utilities are funded mostly by builders (costs passed on to buyers, obviously).
Add pictures here
<% if( /^image/.test(type) ){ %>
<% } %>
<%-name%>
Add image file
Upload
krw wrote:

Being a "builder", I agree to the extent that I do so for that which I build ... unfortunately, it is not a requirement for builder's to do so in this state, and even if it was, the chain is only as strong as it's weakest link ... for neither are the utilities, responsible for the "infrastructure", required to do so ... a fact to which my original remarks were addressed.
--
www.e-woodshop.net
Last update: 10/22/08
  Click to see the full signature.
Add pictures here
<% if( /^image/.test(type) ){ %>
<% } %>
<%-name%>
Add image file
Upload

It certainly was a requirement in NY and VT when I lived there. It wasn't a requirement on the power company beyond the housing developments, though. With only a few exceptions (only one I can think of) it wasn't a requirement for any transmission.

The requirement is an unfunded mandate on business, thus politicians love it, was my point.
Add pictures here
<% if( /^image/.test(type) ){ %>
<% } %>
<%-name%>
Add image file
Upload
In the little forest town I used to live in the power is on poles.
Downtown was a bit ugly with power poles on both sides and lots of other phone and cable wires..
The group of store owners got together and pressed the county commissioners and the power company was pressed to put it under ground.
The power company didn't look back - it was great. Even house moves didn't require them to come and parades didn't have to look at float heights...
It was a win - win concept.
Martin
krw wrote:

Add pictures here
<% if( /^image/.test(type) ){ %>
<% } %>
<%-name%>
Add image file
Upload
On Thu, 17 Dec 2009 21:31:14 -0600, "Martin H. Eastburn"

I rather like underground utilities. I don't like unfunded mandates (or politicians who love unfunded mandates).
Add pictures here
<% if( /^image/.test(type) ){ %>
<% } %>
<%-name%>
Add image file
Upload
Yep - I have two (two-phase) High Voltage lines and a ground line that branches off the highway my road attaches to. It is 12 to 1500 feet long and has two transformers on it for me and I shared my line with the neighbor who put in a shop. His house was powered off the highway.
I have two 'dummy' transformers - they are primary connected only as line terminations while the house branches off and then the shop. Oddly, both house and shop are on the same line. They are in the air and has caused a lot of expense in tree trimming. Thankfully most of it was by the power company and the rest by myself.
This county doesn't consider it an easement and tax the ground as tree property. Martin
Lew Hodgett wrote:

Add pictures here
<% if( /^image/.test(type) ){ %>
<% } %>
<%-name%>
Add image file
Upload
Snip

No, we all have grounding rods, the power co. guy checked mine. But he did say if it has to handle the whole house because of a bad common and is not a really really good ground you will see lights dim.
Add pictures here
<% if( /^image/.test(type) ){ %>
<% } %>
<%-name%>
Add image file
Upload
Leon wrote:

I bet that ground rod connection is now "gut'n tight", if it wasn't before! :)
--
www.e-woodshop.net
Last update: 10/22/08
  Click to see the full signature.
Add pictures here
<% if( /^image/.test(type) ){ %>
<% } %>
<%-name%>
Add image file
Upload
On Wed, 9 Dec 2009 17:05:02 -0600, the infamous "Leon"

You must live in a dry area. Grounding is less certain there.
-- To know what you prefer instead of humbly saying Amen to what the world tells you you ought to prefer, is to have kept your soul alive. -- Robert Louis Stevenson
Add pictures here
<% if( /^image/.test(type) ){ %>
<% } %>
<%-name%>
Add image file
Upload
dpb wrote:

Hell, you really don't _need_ no stinking plug! :)
... ask any South o' the Border carpenter on a job site, who will routinely strip 1" off two leads of an extension cord and stick'em straight into the female receptacle on the t-pole (or the dryer plug in the utility room which is usually the first thing powered in new construction), to power 220/240 equipment.
Floor finishers are really bad about it because most of those big floor sanders require 220/240, and they never seem to carry adapters.
--
www.e-woodshop.net
Last update: 10/22/08
  Click to see the full signature.
Add pictures here
<% if( /^image/.test(type) ){ %>
<% } %>
<%-name%>
Add image file
Upload

I reecall seeing the floor finisher using bare ended Tomex as an extension cord in Elgin.
Add pictures here
<% if( /^image/.test(type) ){ %>
<% } %>
<%-name%>
Add image file
Upload

ROMEX
I guess he might have Tormex'ed the wire ends to make them pointy so they would go in easier. ;~)
Add pictures here
<% if( /^image/.test(type) ){ %>
<% } %>
<%-name%>
Add image file
Upload
Leon wrote:

--
Froz...


The system will be down for 10 days for preventive maintenance.
  Click to see the full signature.
Add pictures here
<% if( /^image/.test(type) ){ %>
<% } %>
<%-name%>
Add image file
Upload

Nope- it's done from the front. Just strip the wires back 3/4 to 1" or so and twist the bare conductor into a loop. Flatten the loop a little bit to make it just skinny enough to fit through the Bakelite outlet face and it makes a very good, serviceable, male plug.
--
Nonny

What does it mean when drool runs
  Click to see the full signature.
Add pictures here
<% if( /^image/.test(type) ){ %>
<% } %>
<%-name%>
Add image file
Upload

That would be very unusual. You do not need a neutral for 220, but you should have a ground for safety.
Add pictures here
<% if( /^image/.test(type) ){ %>
<% } %>
<%-name%>
Add image file
Upload

I'm a bit confused. All of you are correctly worried about the ground etc... Doesn't it bother anybody that the electrician ran a #10 wire to the shop for a 30 amp circuit? I thought #10 was for 20 amps and #8 was the minimum for 30 amps. Am I wrong about that??
Len
Add pictures here
<% if( /^image/.test(type) ){ %>
<% } %>
<%-name%>
Add image file
Upload
------------------------------------------------- I'm a bit confused. All of you are correctly worried about the ground etc... Doesn't it bother anybody that the electrician ran a #10 wire to the shop for a 30 amp circuit? I thought #10 was for 20 amps and #8 was the minimum for 30 amps. Am I wrong about that?? --------------------------------------
It's a function of ambient temperature.
For normal ambient temperatures, 10AWG is rated 30 for amp service; however, a 30 amp circuit in a panel board will only handle 24 amps on a continuous basis. (80% rule).
Lew
Add pictures here
<% if( /^image/.test(type) ){ %>
<% } %>
<%-name%>
Add image file
Upload
snipped-for-privacy@uiuc.edu wrote: ...

You're off by one size/gauge --
14 for 15A, 12 for 20, 10 for 30 is "nominal"
Depending on length of run, for the feeder one might choose to bump up a size to 8 to minimize voltage drop but the #10 is adequate for the 30A breaker (assuming the 'lektrishun followed the rules on conduit size, etc., etc., etc., ... which one would presume would have done).
--
Add pictures here
<% if( /^image/.test(type) ){ %>
<% } %>
<%-name%>
Add image file
Upload

Related Threads

    HomeOwnersHub.com is a website for homeowners and building and maintenance pros. It is not affiliated with any of the manufacturers or service providers discussed here. All logos and trade names are the property of their respective owners.