2016 Accord face lift and still has V6 with MT

Page 2 of 2  
says...

But was that because the fan stopped or because the water pump stopped?
Add pictures here
<% if( /^image/.test(type) ){ %>
<% } %>
<%-name%>
Add image file
Upload
On Sat, 25 Jul 2015 19:35:35 -0400, "J. Clarke"

Add pictures here
<% if( /^image/.test(type) ){ %>
<% } %>
<%-name%>
Add image file
Upload

I don,' believe so. The fan is there to move air through the radiator when the vehicle is not moving fast enough help the radiator cast off heat.
You very likely had more going on to cause your engine to over heat, especially at -20. 30 or do years ago we had a brutal winter, at least for Houston. My service advisors were writing up an abnormally large number of over heating vehicles. We had temps that never came above freezing for days on end. And that was with fans working perfectly fine. The simple problem was that those vehicles antifreeze was not up to the task and the water/ antifreeze/ coolant mixture simply froze. There was no water circulating at all to cool the engines. With -20 degrees and the very likely fact that your fan belt also turned the water pump you probably had no water circulation between the radiator and engine and or your water froze. Unless you had a strong tail wind and the 70 mph vehicle wind speed was effectively reduced to very little, you should have had enough air passing through the radiator. Fans do not move air through the radiator any where near 70. Mph. It as very likely that the water pomp stopped turning fast enough to properly circulate the cooling system antifreeze/ coolant.

Add pictures here
<% if( /^image/.test(type) ){ %>
<% } %>
<%-name%>
Add image file
Upload

broke so there was no water pump, either. I know the block wasn't frozen. The heat was full blast! ;-)

Add pictures here
<% if( /^image/.test(type) ){ %>
<% } %>
<%-name%>
Add image file
Upload
4ax.com:

Not only that, but as Leon pointed out, the fan only needs to run when the car is stationary, or close to it. Using an electric fan means it can be turned off when not needed, which slightly reduces aero drag, and slightly reduces the power the engine has to supply to the altenator, both of which slightly increase fuel mileage.
Years ago NASCAR stock cars (which were required by rule to use belt driven fans) used to be fitted with tiny little fans barely larger than your hand, to reduce drag and engine load at 150mph+. As a consequence, it wasn't uncommon for cars to overheat when running slow due to a caution period.
John
Add pictures here
<% if( /^image/.test(type) ){ %>
<% } %>
<%-name%>
Add image file
Upload
On 7/24/2015 11:48 AM, DerbyDad03 wrote:

I used to buy Honda and Acura. Flip a coin as to which is better, Honda or Toyota. But the grills on all of the Toyotas and Lexus do take some getting use to. We have a 2012 SE V6 Camry and I do prefer the look of the 2015 over ours except for the grill. Our Camry is now 35 months old and has yet to go in for any warranty work. My 2007 Tundra still runs like new.

It does sorta look like a snow blower intake.

Add pictures here
<% if( /^image/.test(type) ){ %>
<% } %>
<%-name%>
Add image file
Upload
@swbelldotnet says...

I put two engines in a 1983 Supra in 30,000 miles (yes, thirty, not three hundred) with Toyota being unwilling to cough up one cent (the first one was 12,800 miles into a 12,500 mile warranty IIRC) so I never want another Toyota.
First one the bearings went on a really cold morning. Second one I was driving down the road about 35 miles an hour in fourth gear and it threw a rod.
Until the first engine blew it was really a nice car.
Add pictures here
<% if( /^image/.test(type) ){ %>
<% } %>
<%-name%>
Add image file
Upload
On 7/25/2015 10:07 AM, J. Clarke wrote:

your frustration, I once had a Vega, two engines on that one and needed a third at less than 45k.
Add pictures here
<% if( /^image/.test(type) ){ %>
<% } %>
<%-name%>
Add image file
Upload
On 7/25/2015 11:41 AM, Leon wrote:

That was one of the first all aluminum engines. When my brother moved from Philadelphia to San Diego, I drove one of his three cars, his wife's Vega, out there. Cross country in five days. It was never the same after that so he unloaded it.
Add pictures here
<% if( /^image/.test(type) ){ %>
<% } %>
<%-name%>
Add image file
Upload
On 7/25/2015 11:12 AM, Ed Pawlowski wrote:

Actually the Vega engine, except for the Cosworth Vega engine, had an aluminum block and cast iron head. Expansion rates between dissimilar metals may have been one of the reasons for chronic blown head gaskets and over heating. I was very leery of buying anything American with all or partial aluminum engines in the 70's and 80's. Although my factory rep talked me into buying my wife the 83 Ciera with the aluminum block V6 diesel. He guaranteed me that he would warrant if for as long as I owned it. I bit and bought and unloaded before 50K. I got tired of having the vehicle in the shop for engine problems. He made good on the promise however. I paid for no repairs. And to be certain, I was the Service Sales Manager for a large Oldsmobile dealership. There was no issue with maintenance being a factor.
Add pictures here
<% if( /^image/.test(type) ){ %>
<% } %>
<%-name%>
Add image file
Upload
@swbelldotnet says...

Yours laste 45K? My dad's was mostly rust by 30K.
Add pictures here
<% if( /^image/.test(type) ){ %>
<% } %>
<%-name%>
Add image file
Upload
On 7/25/2015 11:35 AM, J. Clarke wrote:

Texas but 3 miles from the coast line. I did however, being a kid with excess energy, wash and "wax" the vehicle every week.
Add pictures here
<% if( /^image/.test(type) ){ %>
<% } %>
<%-name%>
Add image file
Upload

Related Threads

    HomeOwnersHub.com is a website for homeowners and building and maintenance pros. It is not affiliated with any of the manufacturers or service providers discussed here. All logos and trade names are the property of their respective owners.