2002 Unisaw

Page 6 of 9  
On 12/17/2013 5:47 PM, Sonny wrote:

:-)
I'll buy you a blade guard of your choice, tomorrow.

--
Jeff

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On 12/17/2013 6:17 PM, woodchucker wrote:

Bill, while not much better than what Sonny had, I like the hood better. Not the arm.. I think if you marry Sonny's and this together you would likely come out with a nice unit. You might even marry some pvc into the support arm (along with the pipe for some dust extraction).
See the alt binaries.
--
Jeff

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woodchucker wrote:

I agree that the 2" dust collection is most-surely superior to the "trim attachment. For former design used 3/8" Lexan too (compared to 1/8"). It seems like it would even work better if the vacuum hose is attached over the rear of the blade.
Barring a ceiling attachment, it seems like 2 separate configurations are required to avoid most conflicts (one from the left, and one from the right). Furthermore, it should be fast and easy to alternate between them.
And it might use EMT since I have 4 or 5 pieces laying on the floor! : ) Imagine a giant C-Clamp with a "blade guard hood" attached to it. Maybe the C could just be "swung" out of the way? As many say, "The devil is in the details...".
Bill
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Bill wrote:

There is some inspiration to be gleaned from the one of this page of Grizzly's catalog (bottom of page): http://www.grizzly.com/catalog/2013/Main/13
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On 12/17/2013 8:54 PM, Bill wrote:

Yes with one exception, the dust collection to the rear of the blade is useless. Start using your saw, and you will see 20% of the dust heads toward you, and the rest to the cabinet. I never have any dust thrown toward the outfeed area.
--
Jeff

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Dust hose attaches in the wrong place. To do any good at all, the dust hose needs to attach at the *front* of the blade guard, not the rear.
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Doug Miller wrote:

That makes sense now. How could they have got that wrong (just rhetorical question)? Thanks Doug.
Bill
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On 12/18/2013 10:48 AM, Bill wrote:

Well It may not be wrong, SawStop claims extreme efficiency with their guard and the hose is at the rear. It all depends on the turbulence and flow inside the guard.

https://www.youtube.com/watch?v=IJEi_lWGeLs

I have the SawStop but don't use the guard at all, If I was worried about the little bit that comes out on top of the table I would probably use the guard but IMHO it is not enough to worry about since you are not going to get all of it anyway.
But having said all of that, the vast majority of the saw dust goes down inside the saw. Your sander, if used with out a vacuum, might produce more dust than the top side of the saw with out guard dust collection.
Just saying, it might be a lot of trouble to try to catch 10% of the dust on top.
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Leon wrote:

Someone posted in the comments section of that video, that the person in the video is "standing on the wrong side of the fence". What do you think?

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wrote:

It may be the "wrong side" in someone's mind but it sure looks right to me. If there is a kick-back, he's not going to get bloody. I *try* to work from that side of the fence.
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I think he's full of baloney; I disagree with virtually everything he wrote.
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On 12/18/2013 5:38 PM, Bill wrote:

Here, I'll say it again:
"Awareness of and an unflagging practice of "Safety" in the shop is unarguably the single most valuable component of a lasting enjoyment of same. However, too often in the current world of print and bits and bytes, playing the "safety" card has become a mixture of the tone of political correctness, a whiff of Wikipedia wisdom, and a nagging fear of being held accountable, presented in toto with a smug assertiveness that presupposes the purveyor's superior ken, but, in actuality is little more than ignorance of underlying issues swept under the shop mat."
As Doug and krw indicated, the commentard fits the above to a "T".
--
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Swingman wrote:

Thank you Swingman! But "ken"? I need a dictionary to read your posts! But hey, you tried to put one past me with "commentard" : ) But like Gramps says, I grok'ed it! So much ww-lingo to learn!
Bill
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On 12/18/2013 8:21 PM, Bill wrote:

LOL. "d'ye ken?", AKA Scots for: "Do you know?".
Heard the word daily from a good friend, a London Bobby, many years (50) ago, and it stuck.
From Scotland, I could understand him perfectly until we crossed the border at Gretna Green to visit his parents in Carluke, a small village outside of Glasgow, then it might as well have been Gaelic he was speaking to the locals, when we begged water to fill up the Morris Minor's radiator, which leaked like a sieve.
Sir Walter Scott, a good read, and user of the word, also ... ;)
I digress.
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On 12/18/2013 5:38 PM, Bill wrote:

Well he is out of the line of kick back if that happened. I say stand out of direct line and where you feel most comfortable with maintaining control. I am typically on the left side of the blade.
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wrote:

Not to belabor the point but I think this discussion is worth having...
If you're on the left side of the blade, aren't you tending to pinch the board into the blade when you're close to the end of a rip? On the right side of the fence, you're tending to push the side of the board that's against the fence rather than the side that's against the blade.
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On Thursday, December 19, 2013 11:03:27 AM UTC-6, k Not to belabor the point but I think this discussion is worth having... If you're on the left side of the blade, aren't you tending to pinch the board into the blade when you're close to the end of a rip? On the right side of the fence, you're tending to push the side of the board that's against the fence rather than the side that's against the blade.
I would think the side one stands on is partially (high percentage) determi ned by whether the person is right handed or left handed and which side/pos ition is comfortable to the person. There is no correct or incorrect side, as per the saw or fence, itself.
Belaboring dust collection: My suggestion to Bill would be to not bother w ith dust collection above the table top, but do get a blade guard. If you were doing production work, there would be a good reason to have the dust c ollected above the blade. For hobby work, invest in a dust brush, broom & dust pan.... and wear goggles or a face shield, if the dust flies in your f ace. Your saw is mobile, so I'd suppose you may be using the saw near the garage door, or at least out in the open, convenient to clean up scattered dust from the top. If need be, add a dust port to the guard, later. For th e time being, get the saw in safe working order and start doing some woodwo rk. Spend the proposed dust collection money on lumber, for now.
Screw that dust port. Let's cut some boards.
Sonny
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Sonny wrote:

Yes, I agree with your spirit. The morning I am thinking of a structure based on a "quilt rack" model--upside down "T" ends, as legs, with a mast of of 3/4" steel square tubing. To that I can attach a Loxan polycarbonate box (blade cover), with hinged front, sides and back--like the box in this video:

http://www.youtube.com/watch?v=cxZOO_zcpNM

As you suggest, I can always improve upon it.
A dust brush came with the saw, and I already have the broom, dust pan and face shield! : )
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On Thu, 19 Dec 2013 15:34:07 -0500, "Mike Marlow"

I think his bigger problem right now is temperature. Hey, Bill, don't put your tongue on the table! ...and don't shoot your eye out. ;-)
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On 12/19/2013 12:58 PM, Bill wrote:

Bill here is what my woodworking has evolved down to.
I used to over think the possibilities and the what if's.
With experience I have learned to gravitated towards not over thinking and simply building something. You will learn what has more importance to you as you become more experienced and can adjust methods and equipment accordingly. The important thing is to actually create something and don't worry too much about the dust. Chances are if you try to prevent sawdust you might spend way too much time doing so and maybe not be needing to do so. Assess your needs after you make your mess. ;!)
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