2002 Unisaw

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On 1/15/2014 12:21 PM, woodchucker wrote:

Same in Houston. LOL

How about that. ;~)

quality regular kerf worked quite well for me.
My blade sharpening guy talked me into a reg kerf combo Systematic blade that he sold in his store knowing about my underpowered saw.
I was skeptical so he let me use it for 10 days with out having to worry about being stuck with it if I were not pleased.
I was very pleased and really somewhat shocked at how much better it was over any thing I had ever used.
When I upgraded in 1999 to the Jet cabinet saw it only saw Forrest blades, same with my new SawStop.
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On 1/15/2014 9:34 AM, woodchucker wrote:

That's good to hear. I know there have been some folks less than pleased with Forrest after the old man, Jim Forrest, died a few years back. Since it is a family business, sure hope it stays on track, and American made.
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All probably good blades. I have bought a lot of good blades through the years, going back to the early 80's, In 1999 I finally switched to the Forrest WWII 40 tooth Regular kerf blade, For all cutting I have used nothing else, I do probably more woodworking than most that post here so my blades see a lot of work compared to most. Probably at the most I send the blade back to Forrest every 2-3 years to be brought back to factory spec's.
FWIW I do not give the Forrest blades much thought, I don't long for something better as I am never disappointed in the smoothness or quality of the cut. Additionally I don't baby the blades or save them for special projects, they are tough and stay sharp for a very long time even when cutting through the occasional finishing nail.
I use this particular blade for "all" off my cuts regardless of the type of cut I am making. The only exception to this is when I have my Forrest Dado King mounted or my 15 year old WWII that I had reground to a flat cut for cutting flat bottom groves
Many swear by switching out to use a dedicated rip blade, I used to do that but really don't see the advantage over the Forrest WWII unless I plan to rip a bunch of wood that is over 2" thick. I will say that Forrest now offers a rip blade, the first ever IIRC.. I don't know if it is better for ripping or simply to satisfy the customers desires.
Anyway to sum this all up, you will most likely be money ahead if you simply start off with a Forrest WWII 40 tooth regular kerf blade and not worry about babying it for any cutting shy of cutting through a bunch of nails and or cutting material that may have a bunch of grit embedded in it. Read that as be particular with where the wood comes from, don't cut wood that the neighbor brings over that has been used out in the street as a skate board ramp.

I use my WWII for cutting plywood, even the $120 a sheet stuff. I will share a hint though when cross cutting plywood. I first make a shallow scoring cut on the bottom of the plywood and then rise the blade and run the work through again. The result is no tear out using a WWII blade.

I suspect that most are on a budget and don't need the longevity that the Forrest affords you. Most any new blade will cut well, the test is how well does that blade cut after 18 months of weekly and daily use.

You really don't want to use a thin kerf blade. Thin kerf blades are marginal problem solvers for saws that are WAY underpowered. The can cause less than flat cuts in particular when cutting angles and or compound angles. FWIW I was talked into buying a good quality Regular kerf Systematic combination blade to use on my "1" hp craftsman TS. That blade cut better than any thin kerf blade that I had previously used.

Again, I don't think I would practice on anything other than a Forrest. Lessor blades are going to yield lessor results.
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Leon wrote:

Jeff was just concerned that I might accidentally "burn up the blade" during my "learning-phase" and that it would be an expensive lesson...
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On 1/15/2014 5:43 PM, Bill wrote:

Not going to burn it up. I have run my Forrest, full up buried, resawing a 1x6 piece of ipe. Ipe is approximately 2.5 time harder than oak.
Just don't try to screw it up...
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Leon wrote:

A 20% hook is pretty high, no? The wood may be inclined to feed itself! Anyway, it appears that I may save some time and money by going with this blade, so I appreciate the time and effort spent to help make me a "happy camper"! :) There was even more convincing than I needed, but maybe someone else learned something too.
Based on reading a lot of blade reviews, on separate occasions, it does seem likely that those who were not satisfied probably needed saw adjustments (or smoother-running belts, or a new saw ; ) In numerous cases, those that made the adjustments wrote that they got improved results.
Bill
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On 1/15/2014 8:12 PM, Bill wrote:

I have no idea.
The wood may be inclined to feed itself!

Seriously that blade handles 99.5% of what I want to do with it, the other .5% is done with the Flat grind Forrest II.
If for some reason the blade does not yield stellar results, you have a misalignment problem with the saw.
The blade is built and flattened to tight tolerances. I gladly pay a little extra to have Forrest do the resharpening and tune ups. typically I pay less than $30 plus shipping. It will be a long time before it needs that.
Let me warn you. If you use a zero clearance insert, do not tilt the blade with the insert in place. That will unflatten the blade in a heart beat. ;~) DAMHIKT.

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wrote:

But then you have a home made wobble dado blade. Hopefully of a useful dimension.
I won't ask but I know.
Mark
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Just rotating the wheel the other direction doesn't fix it, huh? ; )
I'll bear your lesson in mind.
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On 1/16/2014 7:46 PM, Bill wrote:

as I did. ;~)
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Who me?! Yep, BTDT. Generally speaking, if a mistake can be made in the shop, I've made it. Especially if it involves angles. Yesterday I played trim carpenter on a bath remodel, pocket door trim, base board, shoe molding, et al, and managed to dodge angled bullets all day, but only because I made sure I had sufficient material to allow for my usual screw ups.
And, this morning, the painters are covering nicely for me. ;)
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And with a fully buried blade and just a little experience, one can tell by the sound if the blade is starting to bog down or the smell if it's starting to burn.
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sharpened but judging by the new one I could have waited. The 40T cuts so well I haven't been motivted yet to try the 48 tooth.

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On 1/17/2014 3:29 AM, Mike M wrote:

I think the 48 is overkill. The 40t is a good all around blade, the 48 would be too oriented to crosscutting and too slow for ripping.

--
Jeff

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On 1/17/2014 8:31 AM, woodchucker wrote:

Perhaps cuz I typically get an almost burnished cut on the end grain with 40 teeth. Although it might be better for woods like pine or poplar, soft woods maybe.
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wrote:

Leather apron if it does helps, but if you pay attention to the saw you will minimize that problem. One of the reasons my father quit using his wood working machines was his hearing, he could no longer hear well enough. Listening to the machine is an important part of safety.
Bill just so you know you will do "something stupid" or something will just happen, you are doing your best to minimize that risk. Go out and have fun making something, if nothing else make some smaller boards.
The experience will help you learn abot your saw.
Mark
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On 1/15/2014 6:59 AM, Markem wrote:

Good recommendations. A heavy apron will go a long way in protecting any body part that it is protecting in the event of something being thrown back.

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wrote:

young guys hated me as I wouldn't let them listen to music. Tried to teach them to listento the equipment as a change is sound might be a warning of failure to come.

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wrote:

another bolt to loosen/tighten; now it is a cam clamp.
Not only that it would cost $150 to obtain this part.

Riving knife? Much safer than a splitter because it always hugs the blade. You are aware that you can't retrofit a riving knife to a saw that came without one? Unless you manage to fabricate it yourself somehow. Which would then void your "warranty".
You can improve on the stock splitter with the Biesemeyer aftermarket device assuming it works on your saw:
(Amazon.com product link shortened)
Or a splitter/blade guard combo from Lee Styron might be just the ticket for you:
http://leestyron.com/

From viewing their web site, the Grizzly fence looks to have been re-engineered from the one on my G1023. My lever handle is roughly cast, the pic looks like a nicer looking arm. I would rate my fence as "OK". It is quite solid. Waxing the table, rails, and pads on the fence makes all the difference in terms of smooth sliding.
http://www.sawmillcreek.org/entry.php?108-Grizzly-G0691-Review

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On 11/26/2013 12:30 PM, Jim Weisgram wrote:

Yep, you can:
http://theborkstore.com/
http://s20.photobucket.com/user/bacsibob/media/BORK-BBG-Hinge-3-10-12004.mp4.html
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