2002 Unisaw

Page 2 of 9  
Lew Hodgett wrote:

Yes, that set has been on my Amazon wish list ever since you mentioned it, and I even searched the Internet for it (for hours, at first), but Freud apparent has not chosen to sell that set ("PGM 1060") since. The salesperson at Rockler remembered it too, but he didn't know whether it would be offered again either. Studying the details of the set did however improve my knowledge about blades at the time.
I sort of created my own "1060" set above. I'll see if I can get abbreviated-pricing at the woodworking show.

20%-off coupon burning a hole in my pocket.
Bill

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On 1/14/2014 10:09 PM, Bill wrote:

reviews.
Get yourself a 40T 1/8 kerf blade. You can't use a thin kerf blade with the Bies splitter.

dumb.. we all do dumb shit when we are learning. If you are not pushing the envelope you are not learning.

--
Jeff

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It is a no brainer call.
Buying a Forrest WW-II is not something you will ever regret. If there was a better 'bang for the buck' blade out there trust me, I'd own it. It's all I use except on the rare occasion when I rip 8/4 + hardwoods with a Freud Glueline Rip, but one of the three WW II's I own is really all that is necessary at that.
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Swingman wrote:

Thank you.
1. With regard to the WW-II, a number of folks were complaining about their Cherry wood getting burnt. Have you observed any special issues with Cherry (need to cut it faster?)
2. I assume any blade that is used to cut plywood is going to dull much faster than one used for ordinary wood. Does it make sense then to have a separate blade for plywood, so you can always have a "nice, sharp" one available for cross-cutting wood? And besides those 2, I'd expect to use an extra-cheap blade for rough-cutting plywood.
Bill
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While that is a risk working with cherry to some extent, If the blade is sharp and the feed rate is even, and the cherry still burns, IME most of the time it is something other than the blade. Poorly setup tool, reaction wood, etc.

always have a "nice, sharp" one available for cross-cutting wood? And besides those 2, I'd expect to use an extra-cheap blade for rough-cutting plywood.
Use a WW-II and forget about all that. (I have more than one WW-II just so I can rotate one to Forrest for sharpening when needed). I've used the same (high quality) Festool blade to both rough and finish cut more plywood in the past three years than the average woodworker will cut in 20.
Cheap blades are a waste of time/money.
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That's another reason I like the Ridge Carbide blade: it *is* easy to burn cherry with a WWII, but not quite so easy with the RC blade.

Faster, anyway, yes.

IMO that depends on how much plywood you cut. I haven't found it necessary.

I use a portable circular saw for rough-cutting plywood, not my table saw. Of course, that's due partly to my shop being in my basement -- with yours being in your garage, it's obviously much easier for you to cut plywood on your table saw than it would be for me.
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Doug Miller wrote:

Woodcraft (in Indianapolis) has 15% off everything this weekend, so that would put their WW-II at $115. If I don't do any better at the show, I may pick one up on the way home.
Doug, get back with me if you have any interest in attending Marc Adams' 3-hour Router Presentation on Friday. I could be talked into going.
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On 1/15/2014 7:18 AM, Doug Miller wrote:

I have a RC dado set. I would not recommend it to anyone. Size wise it had too many issues.

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Jeff

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I have one of those also. I prefer the RC blade.

That surprises me. The reason I bought the RC blade is because I was so happy with the performance of the RC dado set I had bought a few years previously.
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Regardless of the blade, maple and cherry are very easy to burn if you do not feed the work fast enough. Even on top of that if the wood has the slightest amount of bow, read that as absolutely not dead ass flat, any blade has the potential to burn maple or cherry. Assuming you don't feed the work an an unusually slow rate any burn/scorch can be removed with a few light passes of a cabinet scraper and or 180 grit sand paper. IMHO not a factor for which blade to use.

People that talk about blades that dull when cutting plywood and materials that are not "all wood" are using marginal blades to start with.
The WWII is not going to dull quickly regardless if you are cutting plywood or solid wood. Buy the best to start with and you will not have to worry about the blade giving poor results and or dulling prematurely. If you are having worries with a blade that dulls quickly, that blade was a waste of money to begin with IMHO.
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On 1/15/2014 4:23 AM, Bill wrote:

less teeth when ripping so you can move faster. This is normal period. I have many blades. _WWII is my goto blade for good cutting. _
When I need to rough rip a alot of wood, I go to a 24T blade I have. When I need to work on wood that is questionable, I have a variety of blades I will use..

I use a crappy Delta blade, or a craftsman blade..

Just get a good blade to start, you don't need the WWII yet. Get it when you have made all your mistakes and learned about feed speed.
There is nothing wrong with many of the lower blades, they will be more rough, and splinter more. But some of them will be better than others. The Freuds are better than many others, but the thin kerf is not needed or desirable on your saw.

--
Jeff

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On 1/15/2014 3:23 AM, Bill wrote:

One more thing to add concerning burning. There are a lot of schools of though concerning blade height.
The lower the blade the less exposure you have to it when cutting wood. BUT the higher it is the less likely of any burning/scorching assuming the saw is set up correctly. I prefer to have the bottoms of the carbide teeth to clear the top of the board by about 1/8"
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On 1/15/2014 12:21 PM, Leon wrote:

Exactly, I go further then Leon, as I want the gullets clear of the wood, so the tips get cooled off. Also even higher is a big advantage as the wood now gets cut down toward the table; when it is low it gets cut toward you.
When you have a lot of ripping to do, raising the blade as high as possible will speed the ripping as you can push through much faster with less resistance and generally cleaner cuts as the blade is only cutting down.
--
Jeff

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There is.
http://ridgecarbidetool.com/saws-and-dados/table-saw-blades/10-ts2000.html
The cut quality is every bit as good as the Forrest WWII at about 80% of the price. I bought one of these at the Woodworking Show about four years ago, and was very impressed. I'll never go back to Forrest blades -- especially after having had an absolutely miserable experience with their service. IMO Forrest is overrated, with respect to the quality of both their products and their service.
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How does it hold up after sharpening?
My criteria for what I do, besides a top notch cut, is longevity between sharpening and number of sharpening cycles. Forrest has excelled in those categories for me for years. AAMOF, I have a WW II still in use after 10+ years that cuts like new.
Don't doubt you have a good blade, but it would take evidence of that kind of track record to get me to change. :)
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One of my Forrest blades is 15 years old and has probably been resharpened 5 times by Forrest, still cuts like the newer ones.
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Don't know -- it hasn't needed sharpening yet. :-)
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On 1/15/2014 7:14 AM, Doug Miller wrote:

I have had the opposite experience with Forrest. Excellent service. I also had good service from RC, they had to regrind my Dado set because the sizes were so far off. a 1/4 dado was 3/32 over. The points were so much higher than the flat area. When they ground it down, they had to grind the metal plate to get the sizes close.. Not what I would expect.
Forrest was great about everything. I went to their shop, just to check them out.. This is old world methodologies here, most everything is hand checked to the max. There are machines, but people are the key. These are machinists.. And they do good work.
WWII does not dull easily, it's C4 and I had used mine for years before needing a sharpening.
--
Jeff

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On 1/15/2014 9:34 AM, woodchucker wrote:

I once sent my Forrest to the sharpening service that I had used back in the 80's and most of the 90's, A couple weeks later I sent it out again to Forrest to be brought back to factory specs. Sooooo I was with out for a couple of weeks more waiting on the trip to and from NJ.
Since I have gotten another Forrest to swap out while one goes out for its Spa treatment. ;~)
Got still another Forrest, thank you Swingman, when we teamed up on a job together 3 years ago.
When I send the blades to Forrest I add the note to bring back to Factory Spec's. If the estimate will be more than $40 call for authorization.
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On 1/15/2014 12:41 PM, Leon wrote:

kerf next time, as you say I have problems when tapering legs, I now start at the bottom of the leg so I am cutting against the grain (so to say). And when leaning the blade over I have some issues. When I put a 1/8 kerf blade on I don't have the same issues.
But for my Delta contractor saw, the thin kerf has served me well.
--
Jeff

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