2 questions about glue

Hello,
I am new to woodworking and I am in the process of building a workbench using 22 2"*4"*8' to create a 33"*8' benchtop * 4" thick.
having had to buy glue 3 time during this project (it's crazy how much glue you need!) I realize that there is 2 type of glue: - glue that dries white - glue that dries yellow
What is the difference between the 2?
Also, I am working in my un-heated garage, and the temperature is in the 40s there. Did I just vase my 22 2*4 by glueing them at such a low temperature?
thanks, cyrille
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There is no "real" difference between the two. The white has a longer open time than the yellow. SO if you have a complicated glue up use the white it will give you a longer working time.
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Rumpty

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I own a Lamello glue dispenser for gluing biscuit slots. It injects a premeasured amount of glue into the slot. The instruction sheet recommended "White" glue for longer open time.
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I thought the yellow glue was about 25% stronger. I know that LMI offers a yellow glue that is about 75% stronger. Just has a shelf life of about 90 days.
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Some yellow glues may be some what stronger but the white glue is strong enough to not break on the joint line. Beyond that stronger is probably over kill.
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Leon,
I've never tried the white for using biscuits, I like Yellow Elmers the best of all I tried. Thanks for the suggestion, next time I have a really complicated biscuit glue up I'll try the white.
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It is my experience that Yellow glues are usually stronger then white glues, have a shorter open time , set up faster and are more resistant to water and other solvents. It has also been my experience that they set up better in cold weather then white glues. Both will make a joint stronger then the wood you are glueing up so don't worry there. I have made successful glue joints at temp in the 40's so you should be ok, just allow for a longer set up time by a factor of 2 or 3.
Buy your glue by the gallon and rebottle it, saves a lot of money.

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For temperature, glue has a thing called "chalk point" temperature. Below this temperature it won't work properly. Most glues are somewher near 50 degrees. I thinbk the new tight bond III has a lower chalk point as one of it's features. I'm not sure it is as low as 40.
I honestly don't know that if you glue below chalk point the glue doesn't work, or if it just won't dry until the temp raises. We'll need more expertise to chime in on that one.
All that being said, I glued up for years at the 45-50 point because I do a lot of work at night. I never had a problem and the type of stuff I was doing would clearly have shown a problem (panels w/no biscuit or spline, etc.) Since I've learned about chalk point I've been more careful. I have to believe it has to get way below the specified chalk point and I have a theroy that the clamp pressure and catalytic action of the glue can raise the temp 5-10 degrees in the joint.
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I've used Titebond III in the upper 30's without any problems. Titebond II will form a little bit of visible white chalk around 40C for me.
Titebond II bottle recommends 55F and Titebond III bottle recommends 45F.
Someday I need to get a better heater system in my Colorado gara^H^H shop.
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On Fri, 28 Jan 2005 14:55:23 GMT, "cyrille de brbisson"

Carpenter's glue is usually yellow and formulated specifically for wood. I try to buy enough glue so that it gets used up in 12 months. Keep it from freezing. Forty sounds a bit cool for wood glue, 60 is better. At the cooler temperatures curing will take longer. What does the manufacturer recommend?
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"cyrille de brbisson" wrote:

Hadn't noticed question on temperature at first...the chalk temperature (point at which it won't dry and hold) will be in the 50s I believe. The Type III exterior glue is about the lowest I know at about 47F.
For general use, either white or yellow is plenty strong enough w/ a well prepared joint to be stronger than most woods along the grain. Just avoid the really cheap "kiddy" white glues...
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cyrille de brbisson wrote:

There is a difference contrary some of the responses. They are not the same. Everything that I have read points to white glue as the one glue with a high temperature fault; joints can slowly pull apart. That is, if the glue joint is such that it tends to pull apart by tension or gravity, white glue may let the parts slowly move. In your case that probably isn't a factor. And of course the white type is very water soluble while yellow type is somewhat water resistant. Both the yellow and the white will set at temperatures in the 40s and 50s just more slowly than at a higher temperature. You do buy glue by the gallon (or whatever similar amount) don't you? Glue in the jug shouldn't be allowed to freeze, the white and yellow (carpenters) glues last for a long time. I'm using the last from a jug I bought at least 15 years ago. Others may try to tell you that it has a short shelf life, but at at temps under 100 F and above 32 F, that just isn't true.
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