2 Bench Shop Model

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"Bill" wrote:
http://www.homedepot.com/webapp/wcs/stores/servlet/ProductDisplay?storeId051&productId0427375&langId=-1&catalogId053&PID523498&ci_sku0427375&ci_src043468&cm_mmc=CJ-_-3523498-_-10368321&AID368321&cj=true&locStoreNum 19&marketID'6--------------------------------> Hmmm..I just got back from HD to take another look and they omitted> the mention of that feature. ; ) Lowes was closed..lol------------------------Better choice for a shopLithonia Lighting 2-Light Flush-Mount Industrial Fluorescent LightModel # L 2 32 120 GESB Internet # 100165074Store SKU # 255031$38.96/EA-EachLew
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Lew Hodgett wrote:
Better choice for a shopLithonia Lighting 2-Light Flush-Mount Industrial Fluorescent Light
http://milo.com/lithonia-lighting-4-ft-2-lamps-32-watt-white-industrial-fluorescent-work-light
The description says: "This light is ideal for areas requiring low-to-medium light levels including utility rooms and storage areas."
Does the description indicate it's suitable for "low-to-medium light levels", rather than "high" light levels because it lacks a lens/cover to diffuse the light?
Thanks, Bill
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Bill wrote:

http://milo.com/lithonia-lighting-4-ft-2-lamps-32-watt-white-industrial-fluorescent-work-light
It seems strange to me that the description indicates that the color temperature is 3500K when it doesn't even come with bulbs.
The description indicates that it has a "magnetic ballast". Is that something that should concern me (I thought I was advised to seach for an electronic ballast). Do you think this one is okay for cool temperatures?
Thanks, Bill
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It was probably the 4' length which prompted that statement. While covers do diffuse light, they also absorb and diminish it. Forget the Borgs and shop at a lighting/electrical distributor such as Platt. Prices might be ten bucks higher, but you'll get much higher quality.

If it doesn't indicate a temperature range, it's likely NOT good for freezing temps. The magnetic ballast raised my fur, too.
-- Most people assume the fights are going to be the left versus the right, but it always is the reasonable versus the jerks. -- Jimmy Wales
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"Bill" wrote:

You need a luminaire with a down shade that provides about 5% uplight.
Yes today you want F32T8 lamps and electronic ballasts.
Use either of the following shop lights: HBSL-35, $24.83 HBSL-25G, $22.68
Both are equipped with a pull chain switch and a 5 ft cord and plug.
Run conduit with receptacles on ceiling and you are good to go.
1 luminaire for every 35 sq ft will give you 71 FC maintained with a 20% dirt depreciation allowance.
You just got a free lighting design, enjoy it.
Lew
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Lew Hodgett wrote:

Thank you, Bill
I assume I can wire those fixtures with romex instead. Running conduit with receptacles suggests sequential/branch wiring (to my untrained ears). Based on other things I've read, I expect parallel wiring may be better for this application. Or, are you of the opinion that this does not make any, or (obviously) only minimal difference?
I appreciate the difference in the fixtures you suggested. The "down-shade" appear really helpful. I guess in exchange for that, I have to permit them to collect a little dust...
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"Bill" wrote:

------------------------------ No, you can't run romex exposed.
If you don't want to bend metal conduit, then run 3/4" plastic, surface mounted on ceiling.
Use octagon box with duplex receptacle cover, and molded off sets in and out of octagon boxes.
No conduit bender involved, just a hacksaw and some Oatey "Purple" solvent and glue.
Devote a 2P-20A C'Bkr to lighting with alternate luminaries fed from opposite phase to minimize the strobe effect of fluorescent lighting.
Especially where rotating equipment is in use.
Arrange as follows:
Row 1: A-B-A-B-A Row 2: B-A-B-A-B Row 3: A-B-A-B-A
Where:
A = L1-N B = L2-N
Very easy to do if you pull "L1", "L2", an "N" in the same pipe.
Have fun.
Lew
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Lew Hodgett wrote:

Gosh, I need to print this out and think about it. By the way, I was going to thread the romex through the attic. I've already installed a new switch on the wall, and have 12-2 running through the switch with plenty up in the attic just for this application. You've raised enough issues to make me pause to think. I need to get to work, but I'll be back. Thanks. Bill
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Bill wrote:

Planning four T8-32W 2-bulb fixtures running in parallel from 1 hot through a switch.
Anything inherently wrong with this model? Strobe effect?
I'm going to try shopping for lighting in some places besides BORGS.
Thanks, Bill
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Nope. The nice thing about fluor fixtures is that you can move them around and add more if necessary. Mine are on 2" chains from a higher, (9') ceiling. If you get the style with the reflector, they can be bent out some to allow a better distribution of the light in the shop, too. Put them on a carpeted area and apply a forearm or crepe-soled shoe and they uncurl pretty easily.

If you notice a strobe effect (highly doubtful and extremely RPM dependent) just add an incan task lamp there.

Bueno idea, seor Bill.
-- Most people assume the fights are going to be the left versus the right, but it always is the reasonable versus the jerks. -- Jimmy Wales
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On 10/28/2010 9:11 AM, Larry Jaques wrote: The nice thing about fluor fixtures is that you can move them

Hmmm..my ceiling are 9' too. I hadn't considered using chains. I assume you mean chains that are 2 feet in length above?
I thought about it in my sleep, evidently. I woke and it occurred to me hat the "best" way to power my fixtures may be to install two duplex outlets on the perimeter of my attic, and plug them in there. That's much like Lew suggested, except my wiring would be in the attic.
Assume that the 5' cords on the fixtures don't quite reach (especially possible with a 2' chain). I assume it's preferable to install a longer cord on the fixture than to use an extension cords. I'm not sure why I believe this--except that certain pieces of machinery are recommended to be powered directly (no plug). Of course, lighting amperages being very small, this may be like comparing apples and oranges. Are the fixtures generally designed so that one can replace the cord (easily) with a screwdriver (or would you use extension cords)?
Thanks, Bill
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On 10/28/10 12:29 PM, Bill wrote:

direct wiring. I'd go with the chains and direct wire them, use BX armoured cable and tie wrap it to the chain.
--
Froz...


The system will be down for 10 days for preventive maintenance.
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wrote:

They came with chains and metal grates, which I've bumped a couple times. And that's two inches, not feet. They hug the ceiling.

I had a duplex pointing down from the ceiling, and there was a quad box on top (filled with insulation, unfinished attic) to which I added outlets. I knocked holes in the sheetrock and pulled the plugs for the lights through, then sealed the holes. If I had it to do over, I'd have added that quad beneath, facing the shop, and let the fixture wiring show. Replacement would have been much easier in the future.

It wouldn't have fit with 2', but the 2" hug keeps them out of my way and gave me enough cord.

Yeah, just plug and play.

Yes, cord replacement is a snap. Pair of pliers to remove the strain relief, a couple wire nuts, and a ground screw.
-- Most people assume the fights are going to be the left versus the right, but it always is the reasonable versus the jerks. -- Jimmy Wales
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On 10/28/2010 2:17 PM, Larry Jaques wrote:

It's nice to get the benefit of the voice of experience.
The only thing that makes me hesitate is my finished ceiling. If I install duplex outlets in the ceiling, they will necessarily be "cut in box" variety that attach to the drywall, and I can see myself replacing the ceiling within the next 10 years. I'll have to wait for the dust to settle and see what I think. A few minutes ago, I was thinking, excitedly, gosh I'm going to have Lights AND Electric. : ) Reminds me of the kind of thinking that must have taken place in the early part of the 20th century. Maybe I'll even have Plumbing someday! ; )
Thanks, Bill
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wrote:

HEY, DIDN'T YOU JUST LEARN TO DO DRYWALL? Ya wuss. <g>

Yer a newfangled thinker, Biyull.

Right you are, Bill. A 10' section of 2" ABS will drain 90% of your problems away into the yard at a very low cost!
-- Most people assume the fights are going to be the left versus the right, but it always is the reasonable versus the jerks. -- Jimmy Wales
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Larry Jaques wrote:

Just a 16 or 24 inch section, for each outlet, huh? Except for the mudding part, at least this is something I could do during the cooler temps (dipping to the low 30's here recently). FrozenNorth's idea of using armored cable was interesting too. I think I need to take some more measurements and choose my fixtures before I decide.
Thanks, Bill
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"Bill" wrote:

Yee gads, given half a chance you would fuck up a wet dream.
Take your choice, bust your ass and run romex in the attic using single gang recessed wall boxes in the ceiling /w/ duplex receptacle and cover plate on 60" centers, or stay out of the attic along with any insulation it contains and surface mount receptacle boxes interconnected with conduit.
Either way, the 5 ft cord and plug is considered a molded pigtail that is used as is.
Mount the fixtures as high as possible in order to have the most uniform lighting at 36" above the floor.
Chains and screw hooks will get the job done, if that is what you like.
Good grief man, it ain't rocket science.
Lew
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On Tue, 26 Oct 2010 23:29:51 -0700, "Lew Hodgett"

Does anyone here (without opaque cataracts) need that light density? That's a 4' grid, Lew, roughly one fixture in the middle of every 4x8 panel. I'm happy with 5 4' fixtures in a 20x24' space. You're suggesting FIFTEEN. And daylight bulbs feel brighter than those crappy, amber, 2700k warm white thangs from the Borgs.
At your density, Cha Freakin' CHING! both to buy and use. Saaaaay, do you work for the electric company?
I wear glasses and am blown out by high density lighting like that. YMMV.

<g>
-- Most people assume the fights are going to be the left versus the right, but it always is the reasonable versus the jerks. -- Jimmy Wales
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"Larry Jaques" wrote:

If you choose to work in a poorly lighted cave, that's your business; however, it has long been established the good lighting improves safety and productivity.
IES design guide for a machine shop is 100FC maintained, thus 71FC maintained would be considered as rather modest.
BTW, if you ever decide to upgrade, 3 rows/4 luminaries/row, would do a good job.
Lew
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On Wed, 27 Oct 2010 05:52:46 -0700, "Lew Hodgett"

If you think 320W of fluor against 4 pure white walls and pure white ceiling and floor is a "poorly lighted cave", you need to see your opthalmologist, boy.

Like I said, I hate the extra glare off my glasses. Could I borrow some of your blinders, sir?
-- Most people assume the fights are going to be the left versus the right, but it always is the reasonable versus the jerks. -- Jimmy Wales
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