1968 Craftsman table saw #Table Saw 113 2990301

I inherited the saw when my father in law died nearly 20 years ago and still use it. I have kept it maintained by the original instructions that came with the saw when my father in law bought it.
In those instruction its says the saw arbor bearing are "packed at the factory with the proper lubrication and require no additional lubrication"
After 40 years should these bearings be lubricated? And more importantly HOW?
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Bearings of that kind are generally sealed. There is no way of greasing them except by taking them apart. If you do this, there is no way of putting them back together. Run them till they die then replace them.
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RE: Subject
S&R has used a water pump bearing in those saws since they were designed.
(I had a late '40s unit which used a W/P brg)
As such, it is a sealed, non re-greaseable, bearing unit.
As CW suggests, run it till it dies, then replace.
Lew
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Ditto to both above suggestions. Remember, some of the equipment built during that era were made hell for stout. They hadn't quite figured out planned obsolescence yet.
Example; When we sold my mother-in-law's house five years ago her 1955 vintage chest-type freezer was still churning away in the UNHEATED detached garage. Talked to the new occupant a few weeks ago and it is still running. "No way in hell I'm gonna move that thing an inch."
RonB
RonB
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On 12/30/2009 9:28 AM, RonB wrote:

as long as possible. But since I am not a professional, my use may never require replacing the bearing based on what you are telling me.
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My only backup suggestion would be to spend a little time finding a source for the bearing, or arbor assembly as the case might be, and save the source. If it isn't horribly expensive, maybe even buy it and put it aside (in one of those "safe places" that always disappear). A year or so I would have told you that Sears/Craftsman maintained a good parts supply for old tools. Not necessarily true any more. I recently bought an 80's vintage dovetail jig set in an estate auction thinking the manual would be readily available. I got on Sears support site and the manual, and about 1/2 the parts are discontinued. That doesn't mean you cannot find the parts but it might take a little more searching.
As far as that goes the bearing might be available from an industrial supply source.
RonB
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On 12/30/2009 11:50 AM, RonB wrote:

I have the original Manual for 315.25720 Sears jig.
It is basically a upside down piece of channel with the dovetail template on top and a clamp on the side.
I have been looking for an excuse to scan it into my computer.
(I am slow getting all of my "toy" manuals on line in PDF files. )
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You mean I'm not the only one whose safe places to save things sometimes warp into an alternate dimension? The only way I seem able to reliably find stuff is if it's in a big plastic bin with a label on the front, and even then the bins occasionally hide from me....
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Ditto to both above suggestions. Remember, some of the equipment built during that era were made hell for stout. They hadn't quite figured out planned obsolescence yet.
Example; When we sold my mother-in-law's house five years ago her 1955 vintage chest-type freezer was still churning away in the UNHEATED detached garage. Talked to the new occupant a few weeks ago and it is still running. "No way in hell I'm gonna move that thing an inch."
RonB
My inlaws built a new home in '52 and bought new appliances. Down the road they bought a new fridge and put the old one in the basement. since then they have replaced the fridge in the kitchen a couple more times. Mean while the old one in the basement is still keeping the beer cold Greg O
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On Tue, 29 Dec 2009 19:53:59 -0500, Keith Nuttle

My suggestion on a 40 year old saw would be to go ahead and tear down the arbor and replace the bearings. Have a look over at OWWM.com and on the OWWM.org forum. You will probably find a lot of info on rebuilding a saw of that vintage. Lifetime bearings only last as long as the lubricant and then other things (like your arbor) get worn out. You can probably find replacement bearings. It's doubtful you will find a new arbor although a used replacement is a possibility.
Mike O.
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"Mike O." wrote:

It's a water pump bearing.
Translation:
Outer race, arbor and two (2) rows of ball races are an integral unit.
You replace the whole thing as a unit.
The ends of the arbor are machined as req'd for the application.
Lew
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wrote:

Remove the belt, put a blade on the arbor and raise it; try to wiggle the blade. Spin it, listen for rattle or scrape sounds. If it's moving normally, use the saw. If the blade wobbles, the arbor may be bent and need replacement, and you might as well (they're cheap) put in new bearings if you are disassembling it anyhow. The bearings are sealed ball bearings, two of 'em, and don't have to come from the manufacturer. Measure and buy replacements anywhere mechanics are served.
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