16ga or 15ga nailer?

any thoughts on one vs the other?
any brand suggestions?
my 1st use it to attached chair molding.. but may as well get a tool to do all types of finish work.. i have the PC 18ga brad nailer (2" brads)
thanks much
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Ive got the 15 ga Senco 41XP http://www.onlinetoolreviews.com/reviews/sencoxp41.htm
Works great!
-- Regards,
Dean Bielanowski Editor, Online Tool Reviews http://www.onlinetoolreviews.com ------------------------------------------------------------ Latest 5 Reviews: - Workshop Essentials Under $30 - Festool PS 300 Jigsaws - Delta Universal Tenoning Jig - Ryobi Reciprocating Saw - Infinity Router Bits ------------------------------------------------------------
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I have followed similar threads over the last few months and the consensus seems to be a 15ga along with a 18ga brad nailer is the ticket. Cheers, JG
nospam snipped-for-privacy@mesanetworks.net wrote:

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wrote:

I'll second that, especially since the OP already has an 18....
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PC 15 ga. - parts available everywhere and everyone fixes them.
On Wed, 14 Jan 2004 00:10:00 -0700, nospam snipped-for-privacy@mesanetworks.net wrote:

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the PC 15ga is the DA model right? Angled magazine?
DA250B
http://portercable.com/index.asp?eT7&p &08
$166 shipped from toolking.com
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I've got both a 15 and a 16 and see a use for both of them. The 16 (I have the PC - older version) is very good for moldings and attaching face frames to cabinets - the nails are heavy enough to hold things but small enough to not split thin or narrow materials. The 15 (I have the bostich) is good for heavier moldings and casework and heavier duty needs in woodworking. I like them both but if I had to chose one over the other, I would pick the 15. I like the angled head and having a smaller nailer around (have and 18 too) covers the gap for the 16 in many cases.
Bigger nails tend to go in straighter - I've had some smaller (usually the 18s but sometimes the 16s "deflect" when they hit something.
Happy shopping! I found the best price for both of them at Amazon.
MH
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*** NEWBIE ALERT*** I am wanting to buy my first nailer. Should I get a brad nailer or a finish nailer? And, why can't one be used for both?
Thanks for any advice, Dave
On 1/14/04 1:10, in article snipped-for-privacy@4ax.com, "nospam snipped-for-privacy@mesanetworks.net"

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brad is typically 18 gauge and up to 2" long
finish 15 or 16 guage and up to 2.5" long
brads are good for holding small trim and "tacking" stuff together while the glue dries
finish has same application as a finish nail you drive w/ a hammer.. door/window casework, trim, baseboard and more structural holding power in woodworking.
i dont like nails.. dont like to see the holes.. so would avoid nails in nicer woodworking projects
if I did not already have an 18ga brad nailer, I'd consider some package deals now where you get both at a very good price.
PC sells their 18ga and 16ga w/ compressor for 299
beware, though, the 18ga is not the 2" nail length one..
On Fri, 16 Jan 2004 05:07:38 GMT, Dave & Tricia Claghorn

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