16 or 18 gauge nailer

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I almost bit off on a cobalt blue (nope, not Lowe's, HF) when they had them a month or so ago for $!9.95 This was the advanced model, it shot pins as long as 1 1/4". :^)
I put several people on to the HF brad nailers as they were so cheap that you could literally buy them, use them for a while then toss them. I bought about 5 or six of their larger 18 ga brad nailers about three years ago and gave them out as Christmas gifts. For $9.95, you got the nailer, a tiny bottle of oil, 250 1 1/4 brads, the air fitting, some teflon tape (4 inches!) and a tiny bottle brush which was liberated from each package to keep as a paint gun nozzle brush.
All of them still work. One of them is in a high school shop now and has had thousands of brad shot through it.
Go figure.
I really like my Bostitch stuff a lot more, but I did use one of those for several days trimming out a house when I was waiting on a seal kit for my 2" Bostitch bradder. Not bad... not bad at all. Worth every cent and then some.
I will have to be looking more and more at backup plans as now my Bostitch repair guy has pulled stakes and is gone. I will now have to wait for a couple of weeks to get parts from Bostitch when I need seal kits, triggers, etc. I have 7 different Bostitch guns, so I may be in some trouble when one of them dies. With a $65 bench fee and charges for all parts, some may not be worth fixing. Not that long ago, when I bought a couple of cases of nails, they would replace any soft parts a gun needed for nothing, and take it apart and install any hard parts I purchased from them for nothing. Those were the days....
Sitting here thinking about it, the hell of it all is that a HF backup gun costs less than the tune up kit of soft parts for the smaller guns. And for $5, I can get the HF store exchange warranty that lasts or a year on a new brad gun. Might have to think this through some more.
Robert
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Sooner or later, Teflon tape will come back to bite you in the rear end.
When you thread a fitting with tape into a coupling, little bits of tape get cut off, taken down stream where they will find an orifice and plug it.
Much better to use Teflon paste, the plumber's friend.
Goes on like pipe dope, seals like Teflon.
Lew
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Then you're putting too much on and in the wrong place.
Ever notice that rolls of teflon tape disappear? Like pencils?
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"Robatoy" wrote:

Not around here, especially in the refineries.
It cost a customer a $10K emergency field service call to learn that lesson.
Best stay with tops<G>
These days, strictly a "Henry Home Owner" item.
Lew .
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Best stay with topic. <G>
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"Robatoy" wrote:

This was an oil burner.
Instrument air is a whole different world which is rapidly going away, thank heaven.
Digital electronics have made 3-15 PSIG puff puff totally non competitive.
Wait a minute, this was about Teflon tape.
A little story aside.
Way back when Teflon was first introduced, there was a technical paper written in French that needed to be translated into American English,
Hired a local college professor to translate.
Came back a few days later saying he was almost finished except for the word "Te-Fla".
Not sure whether the chief engineer broke the news to him or not.
Lew
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Ah, any tiny orfice. A nailer? Not so much. *S*

And much more accurate/reliable. That was already evident back in 1975 when I was involved with the installation of 4 Bentley Nevada systems on units 1-4 at Hearn GS Toronto. A lot of that was still analogue though.
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Arbee,
I recently faced the same issue as you are facing. I attached about 40 feet of 3/4 poplar trim (run through my router table, so actually a little thinner than 3/4) using a 23 gauge pin nailer and glue. It worked perfectly. I picked up the pin nailer at Harbor Freight for about $15. That pinner will only shoot up to 1" pins, but that was enough to secure the molding until the glue dried.
Kevin
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Get your hands on some excess stock and try it both ways. Never hurts. That way you get to develop your technique before you go "live".
Pete Stanaitis ----------------
Arbee wrote:

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I would also like to recommend galvanized nails.
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Either one should be OK. I would use the 18ga. Use a little glue (not knowing what the project is) and 1.25 brads (the nailer will sink them a bit).
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