16-32 performax

I have 16-32 performax drum sander. The conveyor belt tore. I noticed a small tear in the seam, lasted for quiet a while like that, then just blew apart. Any ideas what might of caused this? to much tension? I haven't used it that much would think you get a little more wear out of it.
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Mine did the same thing just after I bought it. called performax up and they sent me a new one. but they did not say why the first one broke , just said they had heard about it before.
Len

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I bought one in June, and a couple of days after I took it home, before I even opened the box, the store guys called. Evidently, the belts had been set too tightly at the factory. They had several from one shipment go bad, including one purchased by the store manager for personal use.
The advice I got was to back off on the tension, and to set it so that 1 finger or so went easily under the belt. If things slipped, tighten it in small increments. Now that advice is 90 days or so old, and well may have gone 'moldy' in my memory, so check with Performax tech support for better detailed instruction.
One other piece of advice, from personal experience: There are better ways to remove a commercial poly or lacquer finish from salvage door parts, than to sand the finish off of them with this machine. Even at $3/bf, fresh wood is cheaper...
Patriarch
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Been looking at this machine for a while. What's your take on it for sanding freshly glued up panels? Worth while? I use a belt sander going every which way and get results I'm satisfied with but with a lot of time and back work. It sounds like an improvement. Is it?
bob g.
patriarch < wrote:

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On Wed, 20 Oct 2004 20:29:55 -0500, Robert Galloway

it works better if you let the glue dry....
<G>

yes.
it's still slow. you'll want to get the boards close to thickness before glue up. resaw bandsaw, jointer and thickness planer are the ticket for that.
the 16/32 leaves a very nice surface.

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Thanks. I use resaw, thickness planer, etc. I'm just looking to put on the finishing touches with a little less work than the belt sander. Obviously, I don't try to take off a whole lot with the belt sander but getting the thing perfectly flat and smooth sometimes takes a little doing, regardless. I do work with a number of glueups that are wider than the 16" capacity and I'm primarily worried that I'll be fighting the two pass thing on a wider glue up. How hard is it to do? My 13 inch planer does great on it's designated width but it's not open sided so I have no experience with trying to feed a piece reversed into an open sided device and getting what I want.
bob g.
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On Thu, 21 Oct 2004 19:18:09 -0500, Robert Galloway

for panels the sizes of typical cabinet door panels it works fine. I think you'd have problems trying to feed a dining room table top through it.
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Thanks for the reply. A dining room table top is exactly the piece I spent a lot of time with with the belt sander through cabinet scraper routine and was interested in knowing whether a drum sander would save me some sweat on the next one which is just underway.
bob g.
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On Thu, 21 Oct 2004 21:02:45 -0500, Robert Galloway

it'll likely be useful for everything up to the last center glue up. at that point you're going to (probably) have a panel that is just a bit too big and heavy to count on getting an even feed through the machine. that is, if your table is say 30 by 75, glue up two panels 15 by 75, get them sanded, then joint the edges and glue them together. you'll hve to sand and scrape that last joint by hand, most likely.
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It's NOT a planer and is NOT useful for removing large amounts of stock. It's a finishing sander more than anything else.
Robert Galloway wrote:

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Because I see the 16/32 used in the shops of some very talented, high end furniture makers, I decided that it was good enough for my purposes. What I mean by that is that these artists work on smaller volumes, and very close tolerances. Shops that need the 48" sanders have the volume to cover the acquisition, maintenance and space costs that come with them. Since I do this for a hobby, the $800 or so was enough of a commitment to be a challenge.
However, I know where a 48" machine resides, and I'm welcome there, when I need it, or so I've been told. So far, it's not been required.
Patriarch, who has purchased more tools than economics would tend to predict...
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OK, Patriarch, I played with your e-mail address in the more obvious ways, couldn't get around your ISP. Removed the DOT and put a (.). Removed the "nospam". Put the "nospam" back in. What's the drill here?
bob g.
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gmadsen at comcast dot net
Comcast doesn't have the Britemail spam filtering that AT&T did...
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Apparently some of the original belts were/are defective. I called Jet when after only a few days of use, the belt refused to track properly and then began to tear.
No questions asked, they sent a new belt and I have used it quite a bit with zero problems. Dave.
PS The motor overload switch was defective as well. Same story. Very happy with the tool.

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On Wed, 20 Oct 2004 13:18:10 GMT, "Sacramento Dave"

I think performax sent a bunch of them out with defective feed belts. mine did that- I called their tech support number and they sent me another one. it's been fine.
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My 16/32 dad ceramic belt guides mounted under the table. They worked great untill one broke and ruined the belt. Performax replaced the belt at no cost to me and advised me to remove the guides.
Mike
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