14" Delta BS - Motor Replacement Question

I don't think the motoer that came with my Delta 14" BS is pulling its weight/doing the job.
I recall a friend (now out of touch) replaced his BS motor with a 2HP motor and, subsequently, swore by it and the improvement. He made all manner of intricate carvings with that saw and it always appeared to cut as if going through butter.
Has anyone replaced the stock motor on this saw? If so, with what (specifics, please) and with what results?
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On Fri, 14 Aug 2009 01:32:49 -0700 (PDT), Hoosierpopi

Replaced a 1/3 HP motor with a 3/4 HP bought from woodworker.com. Was resawing, the new motor helped but I also got a 1/2 inch resaw blade.
Mark
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wrote:

I have an older ('54) Delta 14". It had a 1/2 HP on it when I got it. I put a 1 HP on it when I put the riser block on. Much smoother. I rarely use the extra capacity from the riser, but the power is sufficient for almost all of what I need. It's not going to do lots of resawing of 10" stock, but neither is the 3/4" blade which is the biggest the saw can handle.
My suggestion is to find a bigger motor with the same rpm, switch the pulley and bolt it on.
Ed
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wrote:

Not the same saw, but I replaced the 1.5HP motor on my 16" Jet with a 3HP Baldor. Results have been outstanding. Reason for replacement was the motor went bad during a long run of resawing locally harvested maple. The price of a bolt-on replacement from Jet was about the same as a locally purchased 3HP Baldor. I did have to fabricate a custom motor mount and replace the drive pulley because of the different frame size. I could have had the motor rewound at a local motor shop, but decided to go the upgrade route instead.
You do need to be conscious of the fact that the maximum torque of a larger motor will be greater than that of the stock motor. Won't be a problem except under a heavy cutting load that would stall the smaller motor. Under that condition,, you will place a greater load on the table mounting structure and the lower wheel bearings of your saw. I ran the numbers and believe the increased load is well within the load capacity of my saw. But you do need to consider that situation if you increase the motor power of your saw.
Tom Veatch Wichita, KS USA
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Hoosierpopi wrote:

The stock motor on my <10yo 14" bandsaw died. I did a fair amount of research for replacements and ended up with a 1hp Griz. I overcame a certain amount of electrical schlubness and wired it for 220. Works just fine.     zzzap,     jo4hn
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I think the general concensus I have seen is it can usually help to increase hp on smaller band saws with fractional HP or maybe even 1hp motors. The other general consensus is you shouldn't increase the hp by too much because the saw wasn't engineered for it so doubling the size is probably as far as you want to go.
This is just what I have seen discussed.

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Hoosierpopi wrote:

If you haven't already, rewire it for 220 and try it before trashing it. Mine seems to have more zip since I changed it over.
--
Gerald Ross
Cochran, GA
  Click to see the full signature.
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On Fri, 14 Aug 2009 01:32:49 -0700 (PDT), Hoosierpopi

I'd be concerned about going to a 2 HP from a 1/2 HP. Power is a small part of a better-running bandsaw, there are a couple dozen checkup items to go through that will help make your saw run more accurately. The bandsaw can be a PIA if it's out of tune, and a PIA to tune up. I got a Delta 14" too, and very satisfied with it after a few tweaks.
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wrote:

Motor power is also a small part of the load. The blade tensioning load is by far the largest force applied to the bandsaw structure.
For rough, back of the envelope figuring, you can assume approximately 800 to 900 pounds of vertical load on the wheel bearings per inch of blade width from the tensioned blade. That value is based on the 12,500 psi tensile stress recommended by Suffolk Machinery, manufacturers of the Timberwolf line of blades, and a blade thickness of .035". Those values, 12,500 psi x .035, yields about 438 pounds of tension load per inch of blade width. The bearing load is twice that because the blade wraps 180 degrees around the wheel. The load would be less for a thinner blade and greater for a thicker blade or a higher tensioning stress. If you're making the calculation for your particular saw, you should base the tensioning load on the largest blade the saw can use both in thickness and width..
For a 14" bandsaw you can add about 20 pounds of vertical load per motor horsepower. That's based on about 3 foot pounds of rated torque per horsepower for a 1725 RPM motor ( Torque in foot pounds = 5252 x HP/RPM). NEMA standards call for a breakdown torque between 200% to 300% of rated torque but most motors achieve better than that. So assuming 400%, that's a maximum torque of about 12 foot pounds reacted through a 7" (for a 14" bandsaw) lever arm. That's about 20.6 pounds per HP. That load is reacted by the table structure and the lower wheel bearing. For saws smaller than 14", the added load per horsepower would be greater due to the shorter moment arm. And for larger saws, the added load per horsepower would be smaller because of the longer moment arm.
For an upgrade that increases the motor power by 1.5 HP (0.5 to 2.0 HP), the OP could expect the maximum added load to be 1.5 x 20 = appx. 30 pounds. If the largest blade the saw can properly tension is 3/4" x 0.035, that's an increase from about 680 to about 710 or about 4.4%.
I'll leave it as an exercise for the reader to evaluate the significance of that increased load. Note that any increase in load occurs only during a cut that would otherwise stall the smaller motor.
I invite the reader to review my figures and logic and please point out any errors in either.
Tom Veatch Wichita, KS USA
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Thank you all for the feedback.
Of those who replaced the motor, with the exception of the fellow who employed BALDOR), how does one go about specifying a replacement motor - that is, what do I order? There seems to be some sort of reference to a "frame type" that throws me.
I get the RPM and Rotation need to be the same as that stamped on the existing motor and that the shaft size should (ideally) be the same so one can simply re-use the existing pulley.
But when I look at the motors available "off the (Tractor Supply) shelf," for instance, I can't tell which of the three 1HP motors to choose.
They list such things as "compressor duty" on the shelf label.
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"Hoosierpopi" wrote:

You want a 56 frame motor which defines all the mechanical specs.
You want a capacitor start, TEFC, continuous duty, 120V/240V/1PH/60HZ motor.
Basically your standard jelly bean motor suitable for machine tool service.
Have access to WW Grainger?
Lew
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On Sun, 16 Aug 2009 17:02:42 -0700 (PDT), Hoosierpopi

Here is a reference link to NEMA and IEC (metric) Frame Sizes.
http://www.baldor.com/pdf/501_Catalog/BackCover.pdf
The Frame size defines the physical interface of the motor - shaft size, mounting hole locations and sizes, etc. If the frame size isn't listed on the existing motor's dataplate, compare measurements from the motor to the values in the tables to verify the frame size.
If your saw is a US made model, the motor is probably a NEMA frame. If it's an imported model, it's likely to be an IEC frame. In the US, single phase IEC motors are hard to find off the shelf. The original motor on my saw was an IEC face mount which required a new drive pulley and a custom fabricated mount to adapt to the replacement's NEMA frame.
Tom Veatch Wichita, KS USA
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Grizzly has a nice selection of motors at reasonable prices. Here is one I found in just a few minuites. http://www.grizzly.com/products/Motor-1-HP-Single-Phase-3450-RPM-TEFC-110V-220V/H5380
Scott.
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sidejobscooter wrote:

http://www.grizzly.com/products/Motor-1-HP-Single-Phase-3450-RPM-TEFC-110V-220V/H5380

I forgot to add that if you run this on 220, you would not need to upgrade the wiring other than the plug.
Scott.
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