13" planer

I get all my rough cut planed at the dealer but I'm considering a desktop planer for small jobs, resizes and planing after resawing. This planer has a desireable price and fits my needs: http://tinyurl.com/298bu7
The blades are a concern. Anybody know how long they last on hardwoods? I'm using mostly walnut, sugar maple and cherry. I don't think DeWalt makes carbide blades for it. Could I get third-party carbide blades?
Cheers, Jeff
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Jeff wrote:

The blades last a long time. My normal woods are white and red oak, hard maple, yellow birch, poplar, and cherry.
In my experience, if you leave out really abrasive exotics like teak, hardwoods are no match for the stock blades.
The only time I've quickly dulled blades was when I ran a bunch of dirty pallet lumber through it. The sand in the wood was brutal on the cutters. The same load dulled my jointer.
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I am very happy with this one: (Amazon.com product link shortened).
I don't do a lot of hogging, it is more for sizing with a respectable finish. The lock prevents most of the sniping. After trying both the DeWalt and the Delta, the finish was the same, so it was a price issue.
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I forgot...you can get carbide blades for these from a variety of suppliers.
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Robatoy wrote:

one:(Amazon.com product link shortened)....
How well do the carbide blades work? Things I've read in the past indicate that they last well but don't give the quality of cut that HSS planer and jointer blades provide.
--
If you're going to be dumb, you better be tough

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I have that same information. I only ever bought carbide for another planer because of solid surface. This Delta has HSS blades and the cut is super. I wouldn't think of going to carbide for a better cut, but maybe for longevity.
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When you say "for these" do you mean specifically for the Delta or the Delta AND the DeWalt? I check out the delta, no need to spend more than I have to...
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The Delta.
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Yeah, if that is a desktop planer, I'd be concerned about all that saw dust in the house. ;~)
The benchtop, ;~) is probably what you are looking for, your tinyurl turned up blank for me so I suppose it is one of the regular ones available. Unfortunately most all portables have gone the way of disposable blades. Cheaper planer/printer, on going consumables from the manufacturer, blades/ink. While many report that they are happy with the life of their disposable blades, the "rechargeable" is still the way to go IMHO. I currently use a Delta 15" stationary planer but I bought a Ryobi AP-10 in 1989 IIRC and it still has the same blades it came with even though they have been resharpened several times. It is on it's second cutter head drive belt.
If you intend to use the portable for small jobs and the occasional large job it should do the job. Just remember that planers are to acquire a specific thickness and that the premium quality finish that it gives you on the first few boards is a short lived bonus. All planers get nicks in their knives and should be followed up with a scraper, finish hand plane, or sander anyway to get the surface ready for the finish of your choice.
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I'm a nerd by trade...
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Sorry, I meant to include this non-tinied url:
http://www.lowes.com/lowes/lkn?action=productDetail&productId"1858-70-DW735&lpage=none
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http://www.lowes.com/lowes/lkn?action=productDetail&productId"1858-70-DW735&lpage=none
There have been a lot of good reports from owners of this planer.
Something to consider, a stationary 15" planer on a mobile base does not have a much larger foot print and the price of this one is about 1/2 the price of a stationary, if you think you will ever upgrade later.
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On Mon, 07 Jan 2008 13:46:44 +0000, Leon wrote:

My AP-10 still works as well - tough little buggers aren't they :-).
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Yeah, over built IMHO. If you ever loose power during a run through the planer be sure to immediately turn it off or unplug it and then raise the cutter head. The belt burns up quick if the power comes back on and the cutter head is still against the board. This is probably true with just about any planer that does not have a magnetic switch. On a good note though, the belt is replaceable without removing anything that would upset adjustments, but you have to hold your mouth "just right".
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"Jeff" wrote:

You can get carbide blades but bring your piggy bank.
Compared to buying a couple of sets of HSS blades, then rotating them thru a sharpening service, carbide gets to be cost prohibitive in a hurry.
Last time sharpened was about $0.60-$0.70/blade inch. (Less than $15/blade set)
The only real advantage to carbide is longevity between sharpening, or machining teak.
I have an older DeWalt, it doesn't owe me anything.
Have machined a lot of white oak and brown maple with it.
Lew
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wrote:

The rollers will most likely wear out before the blades.
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I have been looking at the same unit. Please note that you can get this as a refurb from several sites at about $379 to $399 (plus shipping). Tool King has it at $399 plus $8 shipping.
I might be getting one soon if I can pry open the wallet.
Dave Hall
wrote:

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I bought the Dewalt 13", last mo. but in the package was extension tables, mobile stand, extra blades. $709 ?? Can't remember where, look around.
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Jeff wrote:

I've had my DW735 for over two years, and have used it on hard maple, walnut, bloodwood, wenge, several varieties of rosewood, koa - among others, and I haven't even had to switch to the second edge on the original blades yet. I'm still getting a nice finish. I always run it at the slower feed rate. Great machine, IMHO.
--Steve
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