12000 grit mesh sandpaper

violin makers like to use 12000 grit mesh sandpaper
found it as polishing paper and rated in microns instead of grit
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On Fri, 18 Mar 2016 09:16:50 -0700, Electric Comet

These pads go to 12000x http://www.leevalley.com/en/Wood/page.aspx?pb127&cat=1,42500 These sheets go to .5 micron approx. 9000x http://www.leevalley.com/en/Wood/page.aspx?p3004&cat=1,43072 John T
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On 2016-03-18 17:19:51 +0000, snipped-for-privacy@ccanoemail.com said:

Those particular pads are designed for plastic. But MicroMesh does make a product for wood
http://www.sisweb.com/micromesh/mmr_sheets.htm

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On Sat, 19 Mar 2016 07:25:38 -0700

have you ever tried these
have yet to try mesh paper but it sounds like a sensible design and i have seen online that autobody shops really like the mesh
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On 2016-03-19 20:15:29 +0000, Electric Comet said:

Yes. but depends on the wood. A real soft wood like Big Leaf maple it would make no difference. But a real hard wood like Kingwood or Rosewood I often 6000 to 12000. I always sand until I can't see any difference between the last grit and the current grit. Then I usually go one more girt
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On Sat, 19 Mar 2016 16:11:16 -0700

from time to time i work with wood and turned pieces that could benefit and take a high polish
will hve to try this brand then
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On 18/03/2016 10:16 AM, Electric Comet wrote:

sold inexpensive Chinese violins to beginners but we always had to set them up properly, as well as rehair the bows. As the violins had been crudely varnished, we used a pumice/oil mix to rub them down and then rottenstone/oil to give them a softer gloss. Graham
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On Fri, 18 Mar 2016 13:40:19 -0600

was wondering when one would just go to a polish instead of these fine grits but i guess this stuff would be a dry application so perhaps that is the advantage
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On 18/03/2016 2:29 PM, Electric Comet wrote:

instrument. One could use 60grit on a hillbilly fiddle:-) Graham
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On Fri, 18 Mar 2016 15:41:53 -0600

you misunderstand
when do you decide on a paste versus a really high grit paper
there are polishing papers for lenses for example but historically lenses used polishes polish was specified for a dobsonian telescope but a high grit polishing paper would also work i think
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I think you'd have a hard time getting the paper to conform well enough to the shape of the mirror. Usually telescope mirrors are polished using a blank with the complementary shape, with just a very thin layer of polishing compound.
John
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On 2016-03-19 14:29:01 +0000, John McCoy said:

I agree (and I have helped grind mirrors before, for a friends Newtonian)
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