10" Saw Blades

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Three part question. First when it comes to 10" saw blades what do you keep on hand as far as teeth per inch? Secondly, who makes the best blades for the money? And last are there any blades to just flat stay away from?
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I keep 2 identical blades, both are Forrest WWII's 40 tooth regular kerf. I have no other for regular sawing. This particular blade does rips, corss cuts, and compound miters better than any single blade that I have ever owned in the past 28 years.
Secondly, who makes the best blades for

IMho the above mentioned brand. They stay sharp for a very long time.
And last are there any blades to just flat stay away from?
Probably
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"asmurff" wrote in message

I use a Forrest WWII (own 2) for 99% of my sawing needs on the TS; a Forrest 10" ChopMaster on my SCMS; and a Freud GlueLine Rip for those expensive wood panel glue-ups.
If I was limited to one blade, it would be a Forrest WWII. While there are other blades that may cut as well, the Forrest is likely a top contender for best value for the buck considering the number of times they can be re-sharpened to "like new", cost effectively.
The latter is an important consideration if you do much woodworking for profit. I have a friend with a furniture/cabinet shop who goes through ten Forrest WWII's a year with re-sharpening.
As always, YMMV depending upon your type of woodworking.
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wrote:

I cut all my moldings on the table saw with 80 tooth blades but I'll change blades for specific purposes. I think my fewest TPI on a 10" is 24 with the largest being 80 and several in between.

I'll agree that the Forrest blades are top of the line and in the long run I think the best value.. For a little less money look at the Amana and Freud. I've used both and they are quality blades but don't quite measure up to the Forrest.

Any blade that came with your new saw. ;-)
Mike O.
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Funny story there. Last year the vice principal at the school where I teach agreed to buy my shop a new Saw Stop. (Please - let's not have a SS pro/con session here) Since it is three phase the hook-up had to be made by one of the school electricians/custodians. He saw the manual and thought the idea of a saw stopping mechanism was just too cool, so he fired up the saw and touched the spinning blade with an alan wrench. The blade stopped all right, but it was toast. He had to replace the POS stock blade with a new blade. I ended up with a good quality Freud blade in place of the one that came with the saw.
Glen
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Did your school end up with a new electrician (or the electrician need a new *rsehole)?
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explaining that he should not play with the toys. I believe that the blade came out of his pocket, but the SS cartridge came out of the dep'ts budget.
Glen
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wrote:

I almost hate to admit this but I bought a "Lifetime" 10" saw blade sku# 46231 50 tooth with raker blade and carbide tipped distributed by Harbor Freight. We are running it on a 3hp Delta unisaw to rip and cross cut red oak and white pine and it is great! Don't remember what I paid for it but it was cheap or I wouldn't have tried it! (one of those something for nothing moments) It's been running for three months with no degradation so far. Kenneth
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wrote:

being touched with a wrench?
Frank
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Frank Boettcher wrote:

If so, you'd think that would classify as a misfire.
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I am not electical expert by any means, but wouldn"t the wrench act as a conduit between your hand and the blade--the same as if you hand touched the blade.
Somebody with a touch lamp see if you can turn it on/off with a metal wrench in your bare hand.
Dave
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The only time I saw the SS being tested was on TOH. The words "senses the moisture in your finger" were used to explain the firing mechanism. They laid a hot dog on top of a piece of wood to fire the brake.
The moisture statement didn't sit well with me since wood can have varying moisture levels, even within the same piece of stock, so how would it know the difference between an uncut finger and a piece of wood? The fact that it fired with an allen wrench also tells me that moisture isn't involved.
So, how does it work?
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DerbyDad03 wrote:

Quoted from an article on SawStop's web site:
http://www.sawstop.com/media/WoodshopNewsarticleJune2005.pdf
"The braking system works by applying a minimal voltage (too low to feel) to the arbor and blade, which are isolated from the rest of the saw by a high-impact nonmetallic arbor coating. If you touch the blade, your body draws off some current, thus lowering the voltage. The saws electronics sense the change in voltage and trigger the brake. The torque created by the rapidly stopping blade subsequently causes it to drop below the table surface. All of this takes place in the time it takes three to four blade teeth to rotate through the contact point."
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Jack Novak
Buffalo, NY - USA
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no, that's proper function for that machine.
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On Mon, 27 Aug 2007 06:31:39 -0500, Frank Boettcher

etc. Electricians do not tend to use uninsulated tools and an uninsulated tool is just an extension of their hand. An electrician blew himself up two weekends ago in our office complex. His helper got 60% burns. The how is with the lead electrician. They were having some issue with the building popping main breakers. Electricity scares me.
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This is what was originally said,
He saw the manual and thought the idea of a saw stopping mechanism was just too cool, so he fired up the saw and touched the spinning blade with an "alan" wrench.
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Yes. I may not be explaining it scientifically correct, but if something touches the blade while on or still spinning the brake mechanism will trip. It has something to do with changing the current flow through the blade. (You scientific type people, feel free to interject with a more clear explanation, if you like) The manual warns you that wood with a high moisture content could cause a false firing. The positive side is that you can touch the wood to the blade while off and a light will signal if it would trip the brake mechanism, and you can turn off the brake with a key. We have been using the saw for about a year now, and that was the only time the brake fired. May I add, I really like the saw. It not only passes the nickel test, it passes the dime test.
Glen
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something that conducts electricity very much better than dry wood, that is.
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That would be a yes.
Glen

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wrote:

I usually have a 40 tooth full kerf blade on the table saw. I have 30 tooth full kerf and 24 tooth thin kerf for when I need to do some serious ripping in thicker stock. If you have a standard 1-1/2 hp or less saw then it helps. Never used a more powerful cabinet saw, but I imagine they can mow through 2" of maple with whatever blade you want to use. For more than one cut it's worth the time to change blades on my saw.
On the miter saw I have an 80 tooth. Not particularly any reason to have anything else there.
Safest bet and bang for the buck: Freud. That's what all my blades are except for the 40 tooth are, which is a Ridge Carbide.
-Leuf
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