1/4" cherry panels question

I need to make a couple of 1/4" solid cherry panels. I have never done this before because I usually buy plywood when I need 1/4" panels.
My panels are 18.5" wide by 14.5" long. I was planning on making 4 boards per panel for the glue-up to get the required width. Are there any tricks to getting a flat panel out of a 4 board glue-up for 1/4" panels? How should I apply clamping pressure and should I NOT glue them up all at once?
Thanks
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Brian
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I like to edge joint thin panels in pairs with a hand plane. Just as some folks do with thicker panels, fold the panels like a book and plane them together. You'll only need a pass or two after power jointing. Even a block plane will do. I find a sharp hand plane much easier and more accurate than my jointer on thin stock.
I glue them with waxed cauls across the middle, and the edges aligned by trapping them between clamped melamine blocks. I'd scrape the glue line with a carbide scraper, followed by a card scraper or my drum sander.

I don't get crazy with the pressure. Sometimes, I'll do two and two. Try it without glue and see if all four boards are too much of a pain.
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Thanks Barry!
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The reason that we have raised panels is not because they look nice, although they do, but because the old timers used this method when making a panel. They beveled the perimeter so that it would fit in the housing and turned the beveled face towards the less public face.
I wouldn't want to glue up 1/4" panels of the size described and would use the raised panel method.
Regards,
Tom
Thos.J.Watson - Cabinetmaker tjwatson1ATcomcastDOTnet www.home.comcast.net/~tjwatson1
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I thought about making the panels 1/2" or so and beveling the inside so it fits in a 1/4" groove.
Do you recommend this for longevity or will the panel have a better chance of being flat?

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If the 1/4" is fully housed, it may not be a problem.
If it's not, I'd want the bigger glue line and the stability that comes with the thicker panel.
Regards,
Tom
Thos.J.Watson - Cabinetmaker tjwatson1ATcomcastDOTnet www.home.comcast.net/~tjwatson1
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wrote:

What you mean by 'fully housed' here?
Thanks.
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wrote:

He means stuck in a frame. To keep the panel flat when it wants to warp.
There is no problem making a 1/4" panel of the size you want, the problem is in keeping it flat. Embedding it in a frame will keep it flat *IF* the frame is strong enough to resist the warping.
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Ok got it. Yep. It will be in a 1/4 groove on all four sides.
Thnaks!

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What Barry said .... adding that it's nice if you can start with boards that are a bit longer and wider than you need and after you're satisfied with your panels, trim them to project dimensions.
In addition, and FWIW, I'd probably do two glue-up's for each panel (2 boards per). This gives you a better chance for flat panels with thinner stock, IME.
Don't forget that if you start with over dimensioned stock, as above, you will have ample chances to re-rip your joints on a table saw and start over if you have less than desirable results the first time around.
This also holds true for thickness, as you can plane (hand or machine) to final thickness, usually giving you better results than if you're locked into a particular dimension.
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AND, if you make the panels over sided in width you do not have to worry about clamp indentions on the edges as those will be trimmed off,
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Nice! Thanks.

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ALTHOUGH, glued panels for a door assembly don't have this particular problem as the edges are hidden in side the rails and stiles.
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wrote in message

Thanks for the great advice! (even though I have been woodworking for 5 years, I keep running into situations where my experience is lacking. It's great to have access to 'more experience' here)

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tongue-in-cheek...an a few down right hillarious postings. I do like this NG.
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Thanks everyone. Great advice as always!
-Brian
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"In the land of the blind, the one-eyed man is king."
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