Worktop to wall (sealing)

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The best way is to plaster the wall to fit the worktop. It doesn't matter if you are no good at plastering - you'll be tiling over it. Get some plaster, how much depends on the size of the gaps, and having distressed the wall to provide a key, put it on level with the back of the worktop, tapering the plaster up the wall. One coat should do it, and when it's gone off a bit (say 1 hour) level it at much as possible.
Rob Graham
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robgraham wrote:

If you MUST do this then het some pattens and batten out teh wall to level with vertical strips packed oiut with scrap to make a guide for plastering.
IME trying to get plastering level is hard for professionlas, let alone us D-I-Yers.
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Yes, I agree basically. However, here the OP has got an existing wall that just needs modification and then he's going to tile over it anyway. I would have thought the guide consisting of the back of the worktop would have been adequate.
Rob
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robgraham wrote in message ...

been
You only need a piece of wood to get the surface level. The difficult bit is getting it flat and smooth for decorating, which is not required for tiling.
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robgraham wrote:

I am good at many things D-I-Y. Plastering is not one of them :(

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if
plaster,
to
slap a piece of plasterboard up, much easier ... stick a dollop of bonding every 8 inches or so and squeaze it in place and let it set, then tile over and if it's on a run of wall where the tiling is to finish, you'll just have to put up with a larger step from wall to the tiling, a nice bevelled grout edge should finish it off.
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robgraham wrote in message ...

Quite often there are just a couple of high spots on the wall that throw the worktop out. Chopping those out can reduce the gaps to tile thickness.
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stuart noble wrote:

Seconded. Just chop away at the plaster high spots, a non-critical if somewhat rough and ready approach. Way easier and quicker than cutting the worktop. This may have the effect of recessing the worktop into the plaster which will aid sealing the tiles.
--
Toby.

'One day son, all this will be finished'
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